Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

I found the answer! @diceless set me on the right track in looking at where the foot of the bulb is connecting to the fixture. Since it was an older fixture (installed in the 80's, I think), the hot contact (Number 1 in this diagram ) was bent down, and it was connecting with the smaller bulb but not the bigger LED bulb. With the circuit turned off at the ...


3

You'll need at least one 20 ampere circuit to supply the bathroom receptacles, which cannot serve any other rooms. You cannot use 14 AWG conductors anywhere on a 20 ampere circuit, all the conductors must be 12 AWG or larger. The likely course is to have one GFCI protected 20 ampere circuit to serve the bathroom receptacles. One 15 or 20 ampere circuit ...


1

The easiest and first thing to check is the trim pieces around your valve knob(s). These trim pieces usually come with a cheap foam gasket, which crumbles apart after a while. Then water runs down the wall, gets behind the trim, and goes into the wall. When you take the trim pieces off, if the gaskets look bad, scrape them off and replace them with a bead ...


1

You are correct that the first two options are allowed by Code (citing from the 2014 NEC here) -- the relevant passage is 210.11(C)(3) along with its Exception: (3) Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to ...


1

That gap should be filled with grout or mortar first before the waterproofing (probably RedGard or some other paint-on rubber thing) is installed.


1

If there's a valve, then turn it off and remove the pipe. If you're concerned the valve will leak, then shutoff the water to that line, remove the valve and cap the pipe there (or replace any T's with a straight fitting). Leaving the pipe and capping the thin refrigerator line will be difficult and error prone, and you're still left with a valve and two ...


1

Assuming that you have drywall next to the Kerdi board it doesn't really matter. The backer board should reach the outside of the wet area. After that it doesn't matter what is behind your tile - drywall/backer. I often just run the backer to the point where I don't have to cut it or to the closest stud. Actually running your kerdi board to the edge of ...


1

Check to see if it is perfectly horizontal, and that the walls are, in, fact straight, and not flexing. Apart from that, the rubber feet tend to wear out. Likewise, because these are held in place by compression, putting a heavy wet towel on them tends to make them flex and bow, and then fall out-- they are notorious for this. I replaced mine with a ...


1

You shouldn't need to have any additional adhesive on the rod or wall for it to stay up properly. You can try to clean the wall and rod thoroughly to see if that helps. You can also try to tighten it (making it longer). If you find that you have to tighten it to the point where the rod itself it starting to bow, or it is pushing out the wall, then it it way ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible