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5

We've got several things going on here: This is a ridge-mounted, Slant-Back Roof Vent -- it's used to ventilate Attic air to the outside. It should not be used for double-duty for a Bath Fan exhaust. Warm moist Bathroom air will condensate on its underside and can cause moisture damage & mold on the roof sheathing. As a Slant-Back Vent, the original ...


4

The reason that 90 degree turns (or any tight radius bends) in duct systems are discouraged are because they reduce air-flow. The friction that is encountered by the moving air as it hits the wall of the turn slows it down decreasing the distance it can travel. There are equations that can be used to calculate the number of bends before air performance is ...


3

No no no. You do not put a subfloor on good concrete. You are then allowing for a moisture sandwich (which is bad). Buy a modified thinset, put tiles on thinset, grout, then you are done.


3

That looks like a double-ended compression coupling. It is used because most people cannot spin their sinks or houses around to unscrew them. Use a pipe wrench to unscrew both ends of that coupling to gain better access to the pipe.


3

I think I understand all the requirements: The natural action when leaving the bathroom is to turn one of the doorknobs and open the door. For safety reasons this action, without any other required motions, must allow egress from the room under any and all conditions. (Thanks Wolf Harper) Also, to solve the specified problem, opening the door this way, ...


3

DO NOT BUILD THIS PROJECT. It is not safe. I am leaving the description here for now to retain the comments. For a safe version of the Jack&Jill bathroom project see my other answer, that begins with "I think I understand all the requirements:" Shop for "Electric Bolt Locks (Fail Safe)". These sell for about $40 to $500 but you certainly don't need the ...


2

You can often determine the whether the threading is right or left handed by looking closely at the first thread between the edge of the fitting. Your picture is not clear enough to tell this from the photo but this shows where to look. That said it is a pretty good guess that you would turn as shown below to remove. This is the conventional direction for ...


2

Your number one concern should be to thoroughly dry all wet materials. Understand that many materials may be wet that you are unaware of. For example, by looking at the photo, I would presume that you have substantial moisture under and behind the vanity. This moisture has probably affected your wall and floor systems to some degree. If you do not dry all ...


2

If the particle board is stable I would suggest spraying the affected areas down with hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide will kill mold and not smell as bad as using bleach. (Bleach will also kill the Mold but may cause more damage than peroxide.) After you are sure the mold is gone if the wood is stable it should be ok. Left untreated this could cause ...


2

PVC screw fittings are unscrewed in the counter clockwise direction, but that's in reference to the pipe they are attached to. You may be upside down in some of those connections. The popup drain connection is made to the sink drain tail piece. You don't need to remove this to gain access to the trap below, so it can remain untouched. Note that most clogs ...


2

From what you describe it seems unlikely that the vent fan is actually installed to blow backwards. So it would be much more likely that the trouble you are encountering could be one of: The back draft flapper may be stuck in a shut position. This is a device to close off the vent for air flow trying to come in from the vent pipe. Sometimes they are built ...


2

Various things to check: Is there a way for air to ENTER the bath? A fan will expel air, but only when there is makeup air to replace it. Make sure there is a sufficient gap under the bathroom door. (An easy way to test this issue is to run the fan with and without the door open and see if there is a difference) as others have stated, make sure the fan is ...


2

I'll assume it's the normal use-case of basically honest people trying to avoid "whoops, sorry, didn't know you were in there". Locks must always allow exit, so deadbolts are out. I'd look for alternate solutions: Electric strikes (retractable door-jambs), which secure with the bathroom light on. Now leave the privacy locks on both doors locked all the ...


2

My guess is that you're trying to raise the tile to match the existing hall floor level. For my fraction-oriented friends, the material that was removed is about 1 inch thick. Foam is generally not suitable as a tile substrate. However, a direct mortar/cement bond with the concrete slab will do very well to dampen sound. There's no reason that you can't ...


1

lol lol Walls don't breathe and you already have them completly covered, with drywall mud and paint. I don't think your friend is quite qualified to tell you anything when he has no idea what he's talking about. Tile all the walls all the way up if you want to.


1

I'm picturing a felt or paper backing that has been partially dissolved and then dried out. It's probably not much different from what happens when you accidentally lay a magazine in a bit of water on your countertop at breakfast and return after work to find it glued down solid. The binders in the paper dissolve and create a weak glue. You haven't ...


1

Plastic stapled to the face of the wall will work as you noted. Also any thin veneer such as a door skin so it overlaps the opening will prove to be a bit more rigid if that matters and is easily cut with a utility knife. if you can't hit he studs the door skin should still remain in place with only some small box head-type nails.


1

Some basic comments on what I would do: First I see that you cut out a 18-24 inches beyond the tub. That is fine. But I like to see a 2x4 right where you would put a shower curtain up and another to the far right to help handle the drywall. Flip these 2x4s on their side since you have electric. If your gap is too big then add 1/4" drywall behind ...


1

OP's comment: "The flooring is coming up next." So this is a gut job. Remove the rest of that wall's drywall and shim every stud with 2x4s attached to their sides, letting them project as needed (a six foot level is your friend here). Drywall is the enemy. Big hole/little hole = same amount of work. Use an 'F' profile style Metal Bullnose Tile Strip. ...


1

I see that the floor tile (and possibly the plumbing, a cement bed, or whatever) prevent you from moving the tub. That was going to be my first suggestion. If it's a possibility, do that. Move it only as far as necessary toward the long wall to make it flush with the cement board. Otherwise, I also see that you have the drywall cut back some distance on the ...


1

A snake has a long reach, 25 feet, 50 feet, and more. So, if a clog is some number of feet into the piping, you may well need a snake. Alternatively, you can try to plunge the drain, forcing the clog along and breaking it up. Alternatively, you can pour boiling water or soap down the drain, to try to dissolve the clog. If you use strong acid (sold for ...


1

Agree that effectively blocking off an existing roof vent is not a good idea for the long term health of the roof. In my experience ventilation is often lacking in that regards already. Also the pipe should be as short as possible; the longer it is the colder it is at the end and the more water vapour will condense on the inside of the pipe rather than ...



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