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What you need is a valve designed just for shower only. Not a valve assembly with a diverter, which are specifically designed for tub/shower combination: No diverter here, most any manufacturer that you have seen offering the tub/shower valve sets also makes the shower only units. To answer your question, the point of the diverter valve is so you can fill ...


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I would check on the type of shower curtain they use in hotels that have an arced curtain rod. This would give a slightly more room. The reason the shower curtain sucks in when you turn the water on probably has to do with hot air rising and pulling in cold air at the bottom of the shower. Try leaving the curtain slightly open at the back of the shower to ...


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Aerator Assembly (source) They're all pretty standard. You should be able to find one at your local hardware store. Or, buy a faucet aerator assembly on Google.


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Old school: probably not, unless the guy who wired that ceiling was generous with the wire. Cool new tech: Yes. They make electronic switch controls which are designed to solve a different problem: "I want a light AND fan, but my bathroom is wired for a light only." This consists of a smart switch that goes in the site of the regular switch, and an ...


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Claw foot tubs cost more than modern steel tubs by about one order of magnitude, but you sure do get what you pay for. A cast iron tub will survive being removed and installed multiple times, whereas a steel one might need to be replaced in your lifetime. They're ~$150, why would you ever reuse an old and abused steel tub? A used and slightly abused claw ...


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The Hardibacker or cement board should overlap the tub flange down to about ¼" to ½" above the tub itself. Then bring your tile down to around ⅛" from the tub and finally caulk that joint for a good seal. The way you have it now will fail and allow water between the backer and tub and into the framing. Gaps to be caulked should be kept to less than ¼" ...


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If possible I would take down the hardibacker and furr out the studs the 1/4" or so. Even with tile over it the possibility of water getting behind the tub is high and it defeats the purpose of the flange.


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NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER use laminate in a bathroom. vinyl plank is fine, but not laminate. you will regrete it for every moment you have that floor. the good news is it will only be about a year, because then you will rip it out.


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I second @ChrisCudmore's recommendation of not using laminate in a wet environment. Consider choosing a flooring type that is less susceptible to degradation via moisture. That being said, the rule of thumb for determining plank width is to shoot for your starting and ending widths to be greater than 1/2 a whole plank width. Here's the calculation process: ...


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I wouldn't exhaust the bathroom through the gable vent. First off, you'll be reducing the size of the gable vent. Whatever area you block with the exhaust duct, is a reduction in the area of the gable vent. Secondly. Depending on how the attic ventilation is designed, the hot moist air exhausted from the duct, could be drawn back into the attic through ...


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The problem can be solved by draining the vent. Be sure to use a p trap to prevent sewer gas from entering. Yes, the problem could be condensed moisture, but it might also be rainwater that is collecting. Either way, a chimeny cap that is shaped like a cone will cause an aspiration effect (like the negative pressure under an airplane wing) which will ...


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You need a fixture listed for wet locations: from the NEC. Bathtub and shower areas. Luminaries located within the actual outside dimension of the bathtub or shower to a height of 8' vertically from the top of the bathtub or threshold of the shower shall be marked for damp locations or for wet locations were subject to shower spray. NEC 410.10.D. Since in a ...


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From the 2014 NEC: 210.8 (A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(A)(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. (1) Bathrooms There is no requirement in the code for bathroom lights or exhaust fans to be GFCI protected. ...


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To turn off the shower water temporarily during the shower, you can use a showerhead valve that mounts at the end of the showerhead pipe just before the showerhead itself: [Image from FaucetDirect.com] This lets you maintain the advantages of letting water flow from the tap when you first turn it on (faster flow means less waiting for hot water, and ...


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The blinds are easy - translucent window privacy film is available, removable if you change your mind, and sticks to the glass, so that deals with the blinds. A shower door would be the obvious full-bore solution to the curtain. Curtain weights (or a weighted curtain) (or, if you happen to get lucky and have a steel/cast iron shower basin, magnets) are a ...



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