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7

What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


4

Yes, you can cut it. Use an angle grinder with a masonry blade. I have seen it cut with a jigsaw as well, and a circular saw for flat pieces, but I prefer the angle grinder for this type of job. Cut it slightly long, then use a belt sander to take it down to your exact line and smooth the cut edge. This will (obviously) be messy, so do it outdoors. The ...


3

First, make sure the rough sill slopes toward the shower. Measure it with a level; if it's not appropriately sloped, build it up with more mortar to create the requisite slope. Then, once you've painted all that cementboard with RedGard, the whole assembly should already be waterproof. Just tile over RedGard on the sill however you like. Any water that gets ...


1

Use your subway tiles, just use two instead of one. Cut them so you split the difference on the width so they are the same size, rather than using a full tile and a cut strip.


1

You ask how to stop it from peeling. Scrape it all off, properly prepare the surface, then repaint. Peeling paint is caused by poor adhesion to the underlying surface. Your's could be one or more of a multitude of issues: damp or wet surface; skimmed surface not cured prior to application; skimmed surface not primed prior to application; surface not sanded ...


1

OSB was an idea introduced in the late 1970s and caught fire in the 1980s. After a few decades of use, compared to plywood, OSB just does not hold up as well. You would have thought wood manufacturers would have learned from manufacturers of plastics, and moved toward fiber-mat combination for strength and durability... guess not. I have observed plywood ...


1

Marek's answer is what I'd expect to do. Thin In order to make the result a lot thinner than 10cm, what you can do is to use thinner support wood on the walls. Since the load is vertical you don't need substantial lumber there. I would also look into reducing the thickness of your pallet wood - you are only interested in the surface appearance and it ...


1

Your question is concerning two things: 1. Proper fitting (wood planks to masonry wall). 2. Proper wood treatment (anti-moisture). So that's how will my answer look like. Let's look at this. 1. Proper fitting. I would advise preparing additional support planks going vertically with - say - 1 meter space (that spacing requires additional insight on how ...



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