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15

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


4

Step one, which I hope you are already doing - put on a pair of safety glasses. You may also want earplugs, and gloves. Use a masonry chisel (nearly parallel to the floor) to get under it and lift it up. You can also drive it into the grout joints, but if you already have a few tiles out, driving under the remaining ones from the area where some are removed ...


3

Coathanger, cut into a wire, with a hook on the end might work. Push the hooked end past the stuck brush, keeping the hook near the perimiter of the pipe. Rotate the hanger 90° so the hook is under, and engages, the stuck toilet brush. Pull up on the end of the coathanger with a pliers or vicegrips.


2

Realizing none of this is intended to support a person, or animal, or support anything over a person or animal. Which answer would you like? In order of suggested preference, and holding strength Open up the ceiling enough [24" x 8"] to get a piece of lumber screwed between 2 joists - then patch Open up the ceiling enough [10" x 6"] to get a piece of ...


2

The first option is if you have absolutely no choice. It could possibly have continuous issues, and you might eventually have to do choice #2. You need at least a 1/4" decline per linear foot. For long runs I like to add an inch if I can. So for a 20 foot run I would put it 6 inches under from shower trap. Note that you probably need to do no digging ...


2

Depending on what is behind your backer you need long roofing nails. I use HB 30-40 times a year and and I use the HB screws and long roofing nails. For shower walls that are a little tough I will double predrill for my backer screws. I will use a small bit for the hole then I will through each hole and use a larger bit. The larger bit I just give a tap ...


2

If you have a vapor barrier (e.g. sheet polyethylene) behind the drywall, then you have a major problem. Painted drywall is airtight but not vapor-tight; moisture can migrate through it. And when moisture migrates through the drywall and hits the polyethylene sheeting, it has nowhere else to go. The fact that it currently condenses on the walls tells me that ...


2

You'd be amazed how easily a bit of heat helps. Try a paint stripping heat gun and treat the tiles as if they were paint. Depends on the adhesive, but it might be the easy way to get them off.


1

Check to see if it is perfectly horizontal, and that the walls are, in, fact straight, and not flexing. Apart from that, the rubber feet tend to wear out. Likewise, because these are held in place by compression, putting a heavy wet towel on them tends to make them flex and bow, and then fall out-- they are notorious for this. I replaced mine with a ...


1

You shouldn't need to have any additional adhesive on the rod or wall for it to stay up properly. You can try to clean the wall and rod thoroughly to see if that helps. You can also try to tighten it (making it longer). If you find that you have to tighten it to the point where the rod itself it starting to bow, or it is pushing out the wall, then it it way ...


1

Floor first. Tile. Cut out the the bottom of the drywall so that the tile can sit underneath it. Throw some cardboard on top of your tile, sit tile board on tile and put it up. Pull out cardboard. Caulk the gap. You are done and everything looks perfect.


1

I'd be inclined to add a few roofing nails in critical locations--corners, edges, etc. The nails mostly provide sheer strength, so it's unlikely that you'll see a problem.


1

You can get vinyl sheets really cheap especially if you don't care how they look. I have picked up a decent sized sheet for $20 on craigslist. Your other option is polyurethane. 2-3 coats will give you a decent barrier for the water.


1

I had the same problem. The new one I found had a point in the top o-ring because there was a plastic defect where the seams came together like extra plastic or blade. I scraped that off and then the o-ring was flat all the way around. No leaks.


1

I found a drain kit at Home Depot that has a plastic L shaped rod connector as part of the kit. The whole thing cost $4.85 so it was a cheap fix. I attached the connector with hose clamps since the rods in the kit were slightly larger than my brushed nickel rods.


1

Given what you know about how you will heat the rooms differentially, insulation is good. I'd go with mineral wool (or fiberglass) since some sound isolation is often desirable between bedroom and bathroom and foam is not great at that application. If you will be doing the bathroom walls with a moisture barrier no additional vapor barrier on the insulation ...


1

The easiest-to-install solution to your issues is a length of 14/3 run in surface raceway and used as a switch loop. You'll want a circular raceway box at the light fixture, and a single gang raceway box at the switch, by the way. (Also note that the non-metallic raceway recommended by dfife's answer won't work here -- Legrand, for some reason, doesn't ...


1

I would simply add a layer of grout here and seal it afterward if it were my house. Anything else is going to take a ton of work. Adding a layer of grout and sealing it is one hours work and quite possibly is all you need. Doing anything else probably requires you to remove the tile from the shower, and this is what I would do at someone else's house, ...


1

The tile and grout in an all tile shower are not waterproofing materials but long wearing easy cleaning finish ones. IF your shower was built properly it goes like this from top to bottom... -The tile and grout laid in thin-set tile cement. -A layer of portland cement or thin-set cement -A thick rubber waterproofing membrane -A layer of portland cement ...


1

This is combined problem. Firstly, your grouting material might not be suitable, but what is even bigger problem person who did ceramic tiles work did a poor job; distance between tiles is very, VERY big, and this is the reason why grouting has cracked. You should remove all of the old grouting with some appropriate tool; beware not to damage waterproofing ...


1

There's no limit to the number of receptacles that can be on a circuit in a residential dwelling. Code does specify a minimum number of receptacles required in a room (NEC 210.52(A)), based on the length of the walls. The code does not, however, limit the number of receptacles per circuit. In industrial/commercial spaces, 180 Volt-Amperes (VA) is used when ...


1

Drywall is the enemy! and in your case, so is concrete.


1

Given that you have a normal size sink you can get up to 48" pieces for less than $100 and sometimes as little as $40-50 for a smaller top. You aren't going to be happy paying money (you buying materials is $40) and then seeing that the granite with deformations and epoxy lines. (craigslist has many people selling leftover granite sink tops)


1

Yes you can. This is normal for bathtubs. However note that there are tons of different grades of tile board, ranging from touch it with a watch and it scratched to some commercial grade boards that are pretty resistant. I have no idea what quality yours is so just note that the coating and material itself (what material and thickness) is way more ...



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