New answers tagged

1

Hairline cracks are not a problem. If they get to 1/4" at any point, then you probably need to have an engineer give it a look over. However, not sure if radon gas is a problem in your area, but cracks in the basement will let radon gas seep in, so it would be worth your time and the money to purchase a radon gas detector. You could probably call your ...


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Welcome to crap construction in the 21st century, where nobody gets basements, just footings, and those that do get basements get 4" slabs on sand often above the frost line. Whether water comes in is a function of the water table in your area and whether you have proper drainage on your property. There is nothing you can do except install a sump pump. ...


3

Concrete slabs crack. Period. For this reason, "control joints" are often cut or tooled into slabs where aesthetics are a concern. They encourage cracks to occur along straight lines where they create less of a visual blemish and can better be accommodated by expansion joints in rigid flooring. In your case, it's not likely a concern.


2

I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At ...


0

If it's a small area around the drain, the lowest cost, least-fuss option is one of these grinding blocks (use with some water and you can mop the slurry up rather than deal with dust in the air. Plug the floor drain first.) The one with the grooves is most applicable.


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A big 7" angle grinder with a diamond cup bit would work nicely. You can also get away with the 'masonry grinding' bit sold at big box stores. You should try to get a dust shroud as well, as even a small amount of concrete grinding will send fine dust everywhere.


1

From the description, I suggest renting a proper concrete grinder (bottom of the page) from your local rental shop or big box. This will allow finer control and result in a flatter, smoother surface than if you attempted to use abrasive or diamond-bitted handheld power tools. If you'd rather not go that far, an angle grinder with an appropriate disk would ...


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I would have to agree, the paper usually goes toward the conditioned side, in this case I would that is the subfloor side since the basement is so humid


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The vapor barrier may have been done correctly; it depends on several factors like temperature, whether the basement is a living area, or if is a laundry area or has other sources of moisture build up. You need to ask your local inspector.


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I always go with carpet in basement =bad. But if you are confident there will be no moisture issues, OK. Honestly the laminate is not that bad, meaning once you start at one end, it all just kind of folds up. It is interlocking and not glued or nailed so you could probably handle that yourself. It would also give you a chance to see and moisture proof the ...


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Give the history you know of with the home, it's probably not a concern. I'd ask the carpet manufacturer how it affects your warranty, though. As easy as laminate is to remove, it might be worth doing. One drawback to the adhesive tiles--if your basement floods you can't lift the carpet to dry things and salvage it. I've been involved with several basement ...


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Your question is fairly broad without device information, but the theory is sound. You essentially pressurize your home with dry dehumidifier exhaust to expel humid interior air. This depends, of course, on your home not being perfectly sealed. This isn't a problem as no home is. The challenge will be ducting the air into your home in such a way as to not ...


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Something better? Get some oil-based paint from 1975. Related: How do you choose when to use oil vs latex paint? I'm just messing with you (they don't make real oil-based anymore), the problem is when you try to paint oil-based over latex, not when you paint latex over oil-based, which is what that green goodness probably is (oil-based). So you're probably ...


3

It looks like moisture under the skim coat has caused it to separate. To repair chip off the loose material and add a new skim coat and repaint. If you have a drainage problem this may continue to happen over time as the moisture working its way through the wall is the problem. Make sure all gutters drain away from the foundation. If you have a sump pump try ...


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As long as you have proper drains and a good pump/pit for the water to drain into 8' is not a problem. Check local code as some require a larger pit when located a long distance from the toilet. I think the distance for the larger pit was based on number of levels + bathrooms.


2

I've recently had a problem with my gas water heater turning off frequently. When I called the manufacturer, they asked if I had a dryer in the same room. My answer was, "yes, the dryer sits next to the water heater in an open room of the basement." The rep said that was most likely the problem. When hot water heaters are in the same room with dryers, over ...



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