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1

Option 1 - tapcon screws (or similar) into the solid parts of the block. Option 2 - stuff some wire mesh a few inches down the holes. Mix a very stiff mortar/concrete, place on top of the mesh, make a lovely smooth flat surface, and drop in some anchor bolts (probably overkill for a windowframe) or just screw the board in with tapcons or the like but ...


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Basements are often moist. You may want to consider a dehumidifier, if you aren't running one already. Caveat: they burn a lot of electricity.


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If you didn't put insulation and/or a poly vapor barrier over the bare dirt before you poured the basement slab, you made a mistake, and that mistake is causing moisture in the soil to wick into the concrete, keeping it saturated with water. That's very difficult to fix now, but vinyl will not mold, so you may be okay. If you're really worried about it, you ...


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The crack in the basement floor looks like it goes under the wood as well. Cracks in foundations tend to let water in. Water + wood = mold. I hope you have sufficient crack repairs done and an underlay in place that will help to prevent moisture transfer into the wood floor, but most options I am aware of would make the wood floor match up closer in height ...


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Ditra is excellent, why not use a transition strip from the tile to the hardwood. You can get them in marble, stone or metal and they are perfect for situations like this. You don't want to be tearing up the cracked tiles in 1 year.


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Use a thinner crack isolation sheet, ask for "slip-sheet" at the tile store. Some will bridge cracks up to 1/8" wide. Note, although slip-sheet works great for cracks caused by horizontal movement, they are not great for preventing cracks caused by vertical movement.


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It looks like your house is on a rise (assuming there is no hill hidden behind it in the picture). If that is the case then the water is probably coming in from below, which means there is a high water table there. If there are signs of moisture in the basement, it means flooding is frequent. To prevent this, you would have to build a drain all around the ...


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Without knowing what the interior drainage is now, it's not obvious that upgrading that will be of much benefit. If it's there, and water is coming through the walls, making more of it will probably not impact what's coming through the walls. If it's not actually defective/failed, replacing it seems like a probable waste of time & money. The exterior ...


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For insulation (either thermal or acoustic) use batt insulation between the joists (e.g. Roxull or other mineral wool type which seem better for sound insulation purposes). For additional soundproofing and a finished ceiling, you may want to consider a resilient channel ceiling, with some kind of removeable tiles (e.g. ...


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Several items in my basement are on 4 bricks. With a reasonably stiff mortar, it's not hard to get the 4 bricks level (and you only HAVE to get them close enough for the feet to compensate.) Indeed, with a relatively stiff mortar you don't even need the brick, perhaps (I do to keep things above the waterline when things get out of hand inflow-wise.) Perhaps ...


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Instead of temporary forms, make permanent ones. Cut a 2x4 in to a wedge shape, apply a thick bead of silicone down the middle of the underside, and screw them down with masonry screws. Once the silicone sets, fill your forms with cement. Now you have a nice level permanent pad for your machines.


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You'd want to use a products like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Quikrete-1-qt-Concrete-Crack-Seal-864000/100318507 It'll be hard to get concrete mix into such a small hole without leaving a void. This crack sealer is designed for smaller holes & cracks. Documentation here: http://www.quikrete.com/PDFs/Projects/RepairingConcrete.pdf


3

Depending on the size, weight would be my only structural concern. A large window well filled only with concrete is going to weigh a ton. That could potentially put unwanted pressure on the foundation. The windows should be blocked/bricked in, add some below grade sealer/barrier (whatever the foundation of the building is made of), the hole filled with ...


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1, 2, 4 or the variant of 4 that is a raised perforated pipe; or the variant of 1 & 4 that is cutting a hole for a large filter-basket below the current floor level - but you probably don't need to "clean it every time it rains" - in all liklihood, checking it once a week or so and cleaning it as needed will suffice, with a possible need to check more in ...


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I ended up buying two new doorbells with speakers instead of chimes. I was told by the manufacture that these will work on 16va. Plugged everything together and now it works.


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Where do you live? If the plan is to use the space as living space, most code will require a minimum ceiling height. That's usually 7'. So you either have to accept that you can only use a portion of the crawlspace, or you have to dig down deeper. To dig down deeper, you need to bring in a structural engineer to figure out how to underpin the existing ...


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Finished basements are great, but, especially in an old house, they can and will flood from time to time. It's inevitable; design accordingly. This means no wooden walls, no drywall, no carpet, no hardwood flooring, etc. Don't use anything that would be destroyed by standing water. Here's how I would do it: Level the dirt floor. Build a drain in the center ...


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I know that my answer will not be a proper one (ok, you may downvote if you wish...), but my experience tells me that it's a serious problem. Cracks on walls always tell that something serious is around. My advice is to find a civil engineer/specialist to make a proper judgement of this matter. I strongly reccomend that, and I guess that this question will ...


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Well, these 'issues' so to speak are rather commonly seen on smaller construction sites (at my area of living) and are result of problems/mistakes while concrete laying. Probably all of them (as far as I can see from these pictures) are made by poor concrete thickening (without or with poor use of concrete vibrators or other devices). These, ideally, ...


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This is going to be sort of a comment, or at least not a complete answer. When designing the system, the goal is not to create a breeze through the space. The goal is to control pressure equalization in such a way that the air is mixed and dehumidified (conditioned). Having one large return at one end of the space, and a large return at the other may work. ...



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