New answers tagged

1

There is no place in the code book that I can recall that requires 12" centers for a bearing wall. You can move over the studs to a 16" center, rather than making a header. If you choose to. The drywall will make it a little tough to do that...


0

Even without knowing anything about how your structure sits, I'm 99.9% sure that slapping studs on each side (10" spacing and 14" spacing, as you described) will be perfectly fine. Typical bearing wall construction is 16" on center, frequently with 2x4s, so you'll be up to code and have something to attach drywall to.


0

Looks like you have concrete pillars with 2x's coming out of them. Perhaps you can frame a deck floor space, fastening treated lumber to them and maybe anchoring a joist to the concrete wall. If you anchored to the center posts at concrete pillar, there would be no support problems. Use 2x6, 2x8 should work. Good luck


0

The compounds in epoxy paints are mutagenic and are to be avoided. Always use a respirator or supplied air mask.. A common misconception is it takes years of exposure to cause problems, which is compounded by the fact cancer takes years to grow to a detectable size.


2

Those "straight lines" are control joints (as opposed to expansion joints). The contractor knows that concrete slabs invariably crack, and they install those to make the cracks less conspicuous. That said, you do seem to have more cracks than I'd have expected, and they appear more open than is typical. The one is oddly close to the exterior wall. I'd ask ...


2

Totally not a problem - if it was a problem, the sump would be overflowing and you'd be asking about the flood. The force of a stream of water coming in from a side pipe to a sump is quite minor compared with the force of the collected water pushing up on the float. Assume that it DID affect operation - once the water had risen to the level of the pipe, ...


3

Yes. RV antifreeze (propylene glycol) is also said to work well. Anything that doesn't evaporate, doesn't rot, and isn't damaging to the plumbing or the environment will do. You could also stop them with rubber mats, test plugs, or rags, as appropriate.


0

There are domed window well covers for these applications. A search of window well covers should give you leads for the rights size and material. Note that egress windows must be easily exited. If this is an egress window, check your local code to see if a cover is allowed and how removable it must be. Images and links are illustrative only, not an ...


1

I am not sure about your location. If you are in the far north it is a great policy to insulate your basement floors - rigid foam sheets and OSB is certainly a great way to do it and probably the easiest. However if you are in a mixed climate, I am not sure what you are looking for out of the insulated floor. The energy savings will not be there as cool ...


0

Use a milk carton as a forms, tape them to the floor and fill with concrete or patch, starting with the lowest corner and level each of them. They do not need to be very thick, but now you ave four sturdy, level pads for the washer feet to rest. You could put a plywood platform on top, but you really just need the 4 pads.


2

One possible solution would be to get a clear plexiglass panel, cut it to size and seal it on the window. You can either build a "dam" blocking the lower half of the window, or seal the whole surface and make it waterproof. Of course, air flow in this case will be completely blocked, which may be a problem (and in some jurisdictions, illegal - where I live ...


2

Short term solution: use solid concrete blocks and polyurethane caulk (like you have between the sidewalk and house.) to build a dam in front of the window. Blocks ar available in various sizes and you could use some 8" ones on edge to build an 8" dam if you think it needs to be that tall. Long term solution: remove part of the sidewalk and install a drain ...


1

I wouldn't recommend bonding sill plates directly to a concrete floor. Any wood in direct contact with basement concrete is asking for trouble. Concrete is porous and will wick moisture to anything placed on top of it. In order to prevent moisture wicking into the sill plate and consequent danger of mould, mildew, and rot, it's better to lay a 12" wide sheet ...


0

I wouldn't fasten any wood (even pressure-treated) to undergrade concrete without a vapour barrier in between the two. Concrete is porous, and will without doubt enable moisture to wick into the wood, leading to rot or mould. It's not difficult to run a 12"-wide strip of polyethylene plastic under the wood, which will extend the life of any wood on concrete, ...


0

I'd trust construction adhesive without any mechanical fasteners if you fit your new wall framing snugly. The friction provided by well-fit studs along with the glue will result in a bond that won't likely ever move. Exceptions would be if you intend to ever mount very heavy items on the wall, or if you have heavy solid-core doors in that location. All ...


1

I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


0

That's how it's done, don't forget to apply chemical tape to the seams and seal the areas around the wall prior to installing it. You won't have another chance with out removing the wall first.


2

I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


1

Wow that was a long question! First welcome to the stack exchange , now to try to answer your questions. First if you want to spend just a little $ and do trim and framing Don't get a jig saw! Your cuts will not be square. A chop saw that can tilt can be purchased for a few more $ and it can cut square 2x4's and miter cuts. Chop saws cannot rip lumber and I ...


0

I just up sized to a 75 pint it works wonderfully. Keeps our basement around 1400 sq feet, at 45% without running all the time. 50 Pint should work but will run more then a bigger one.My opinion, when you can look at a 75 pt. would serve you better in the long run using less power for the size of the area your using it.



Top 50 recent answers are included