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I wouldn't fasten any wood (even pressure-treated) to undergrade concrete without a vapour barrier in between the two. Concrete is porous, and will without doubt enable moisture to wick into the wood, leading to rot or mould. It's not difficult to run a 12"-wide strip of polyethylene plastic under the wood, which will extend the life of any wood on concrete, ...


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I'd trust construction adhesive without any mechanical fasteners if you fit your new wall framing snugly. The friction provided by well-fit studs along with the glue will result in a bond that won't likely ever move. Exceptions would be if you intend to ever mount very heavy items on the wall, or if you have heavy solid-core doors in that location. All ...


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I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


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That's how it's done, don't forget to apply chemical tape to the seams and seal the areas around the wall prior to installing it. You won't have another chance with out removing the wall first.


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I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


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Wow that was a long question! First welcome to the stack exchange , now to try to answer your questions. First if you want to spend just a little $ and do trim and framing Don't get a jig saw! Your cuts will not be square. A chop saw that can tilt can be purchased for a few more $ and it can cut square 2x4's and miter cuts. Chop saws cannot rip lumber and I ...


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I just up sized to a 75 pint it works wonderfully. Keeps our basement around 1400 sq feet, at 45% without running all the time. 50 Pint should work but will run more then a bigger one.My opinion, when you can look at a 75 pt. would serve you better in the long run using less power for the size of the area your using it.


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As requested: That far away I cant see any problem. Your soil had to be stable enough to put the basement in. I would not even worry about a monolith that far away.


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Turn off the main supply and connect the supply line(s) to the faucet. You will need a brass tee, crimps, and the connector for the pipe to the faucet, and some pipe. If you want to use a silcock instead of a sink, you still need to attach it to something. I would start there (build something to hold the silcock), and attach the pipe to it once I figured ...


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If you're not going to use a 2-pack epoxy, don't paint your floor. You'll hate yourself later. A 2-pack is a paint-like product that comes in 2 cans, you mix it in a certain proportion, and you have a limited time to apply it. Regular paint will fail. And I don't mean "will come off in nice sheets you can peel up, oh no. Other than the failing spots, ...


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This completely depends on your expectations. I paint my room every 5-6 years with the basic grey basement paint. It scratches, you mop with hot water or bleach, it peels. Not too bad but after a few years it doesn't look perfect, but certainly better than the dirty, rusty concrete that was there before it. And I have a full squat rack and 800 pounds ...


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The 2-part epoxy is a fantastic sealer, and is almost impervious to conventional weapons. You won't regret the additional expense, and it's a safe bet that the room might be unfinished longer than planned. If you can swing it, the epoxy is a great idea in terms of making the basement room behave much more like a normal above-ground room. You might save ...


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I think you can do both, but framing walls on top of subfloor is less potentially less work. If you use a product like DriCore for the subfloor, they even explicitly recommend you frame on top of their subfloor product. They do, however, recommend you screw the framing through the subfloor into the concrete with something like 3" Tapcons spaced every 4 ft ...


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My suggestion keep your basement sealed, run humidifier 55-60 RH in humid summer & 60-65 RF when dryer/cooler. No need to run in winter if temp around 45-65%temp.


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The "current plan" is probably what I would do. However, you could probably get away with just using one wedge on the top tread and one on the bottom; that will probably provide enough friction to keep the ramp from sliding off. If it doesn't, I'd add one in the middle.


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What I ended up doing was similar to what people suggested by putting up a temporary barrier. I waited for drywall on one side (I was lucky to be able to do that because I had an unconditioned space), then I put the cotton insulation in and held it in with R11 kraft faced. Considering it's for sound control the double insulation was not a bad thing (so ...


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Probably too late for you, but when I had a similar issue I wrapped the back in this sheet material before insulating. It was easy to install with staples and then I sprayed foam around the edges. On the inside where some bays were too wide for the insulation that I had at hand, I just put a piece of duct tape across the bay at the top, middle and bottom, to ...


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You either dissemble it from its closest union, or start cutting. If it leads to a pump, I'd advise installing unions at both ends of it, to facilitate replacements. Simply tightening this pipe probably isn't the way to go. It's likely deteriorated at the threads and that's why it's leaking. You'll risk snapping it off in the fitting to get it watertight ...


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If you plan on using dri-core then you don't need to level the floor with self-leaving concrete or any similar method. Instead, you'd just shim the dri-core panels to make them level. If you are just going to put down standard OSB then you'd want to use self-leaving concrete. A big advantage to just shimming the dri-core is that most basement floors ...


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From the comments it sounds like you have drywall on one side. I'd set up a measuring jig to give consistent, square cuts, and cut your batts to length so that they fit well horizontally. Stack them in the stud spaces. If necessary, apply a sheeting over it to give additional support. Something with a textured surface might be preferable to polyethylene ...


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Searching Google for 24" denim batts turned up a ton of options that are available. Here is an example. Using this will be WAY easier than trying to hack 16" stuff together. If you are pretty intent on going with 16", you could try placing the insulation in the cavity and then stapling 24" wide paper like this over it to hold it in place. If I were doing ...


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Cement and mortar are not inherently water proof. Water penetration into the basement is probably not the cause of eroded mortar but instead indicative of a more serious problem stemming from the outside. A complete fix will involve digging up the area outside the foundation, applying proper water proofing, installing weeping tile (or replacing) and ...



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