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The best systems have a return in every room that has a supply register, but a lot of systems work just fine with only a central return (usually located right at the furnace). To achieve the highest efficiency, you're going to have to do a heat load calculation, however it sounds like it's working fine. A good system will have balancing dampers placed ...


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To be honest it just depends on how many cfm of duct work u already have installed in your home your unit is designed to cary 1200 cfm of air at 3 tons so if you've already reached 1200 cfm you would not have the capacity to supply another vent unless you had one room that stays cooler than the rest that you could downsize the duct on to provide you with the ...


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I'd say maybe you don't, if it doesn't have any exterior walls, which it does, so that's a yes. Drywall is the enemy. This is also a good time to upgrade any of the electrical on the interior walls as well. You're two steps from a gut job; go for it. As to whether you need more registers elsewhere, I don't know; I'm not a math wiz: calculate the heat load ...


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When modifying load bearing walls and betting your house on the results, you are well served to hire a civil engineer to analyze the situation and tell you what will work, rather than guessing. It should not be terribly expensive.


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Any area that contains water lines should be heated if temps hit freezing where you live. Crawl spaces without insulation should also be heated in these climates particularly if you have non-carpeted floors above them to avoid cold floors in the winter. Also, I'm not an HVAC expert, but I've been told you should condition the air through which uninsulated ...


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There's typically a drainage system around the inside perimeter of the basement (perimeter drain), which feeds into the sump pit. If the pump is not removing water, the drains will fill just the same as the pit. Water always finds level, so if it's above the rim of the pit, it's also filled the drains. So theoretically, water could seep in anywhere ...


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As long as the concrete and some time after pouring to set up, water won't hurt anything (they make swimming pools out of concrete). Granted, you'll want it all pumped out and dried out before framing, though. As for the wood, no real damage should come about after 5 week of being exposed to the weather. You certainly don't want to leave your framing ...


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I have a basement floor that is concrete. When we finished it off, we used a product called DriCore as the sub floor. This is a plywood with a plastic bottom. It's specifically designed for basements, and it raises the floor a little bit. The disadvantage is that you essentially do the floor twice. :) Also the cost is higher. With that said I have ...


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If you were in a really dry region, it might be overkill, but window wells and covers also help protect basement windows from physical damage (stuff the mower throws, ornery pets, etc). That said, two inches isn't terribly much, and installing them would probably be prudent if you planned to raise the grade around the window with flower beds or something. ...


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It's the combination of polyethylene and fiberglass batt insulation. What you have there is a mold-and-rot-machine. For more info, see http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/digests/bsd-103-understanding-basements/ You need to remove the poly sheeting at a minimum. Preferably, you would redo the basement wall entirely to have rigid foam insulation against ...


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In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


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DIY epoxy floor paints do not normally require respiratory protection during application (by brush or roller) as long as adequate ventilation is provided. These "off the shelf" products are designed for use by laypersons. What is "adequate"? Open all doors and windows, for basements or other areas with scant natural ventilation put a box fan or two in a door ...


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Your window well should already have a drain that ties into the drain tiles around your foundation. This is likely already tied into your sump. Often over time the drains get clogged up and filled with debris. The solution is to dig out the window well and unclog the drain. You should have about a foot of crushed gravel that stops 6" below the window level ...


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Those aren't sub layers. I would say those are actually just layers of paint. The mesh could be left over from a carpet that was once there. Potentially, that's the glue mixed with the carpet mesh that didn't get removed when they removed the carpet. Refinishing would require you to sand that baby down, and choose what you want to paint over it. Latex paint ...


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55% has been the magic number for me when the humidity is at it's heaviest (with outside temp at about 80 degrees) With my window air conditioner (8000 btu) and a couple of fans to keep the air circulating, it manages to cool my 1500 sq. ft. open living area very well in about an hour of turning everything on. It's not cold but comfortable.


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Option 1 - tapcon screws (or similar) into the solid parts of the block. Option 2 - stuff some wire mesh a few inches down the holes. Mix a very stiff mortar/concrete, place on top of the mesh, make a lovely smooth flat surface, and drop in some anchor bolts (probably overkill for a windowframe) or just screw the board in with tapcons or the like but ...


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Basements are often moist. You may want to consider a dehumidifier, if you aren't running one already. Caveat: they burn a lot of electricity.


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If you didn't put insulation and/or a poly vapor barrier over the bare dirt before you poured the basement slab, you made a mistake, and that mistake is causing moisture in the soil to wick into the concrete, keeping it saturated with water. That's very difficult to fix now, but vinyl will not mold, so you may be okay. If you're really worried about it, you ...


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The crack in the basement floor looks like it goes under the wood as well. Cracks in foundations tend to let water in. Water + wood = mold. I hope you have sufficient crack repairs done and an underlay in place that will help to prevent moisture transfer into the wood floor, but most options I am aware of would make the wood floor match up closer in height ...


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Ditra is excellent, why not use a transition strip from the tile to the hardwood. You can get them in marble, stone or metal and they are perfect for situations like this. You don't want to be tearing up the cracked tiles in 1 year.


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Use a thinner crack isolation sheet, ask for "slip-sheet" at the tile store. Some will bridge cracks up to 1/8" wide. Note, although slip-sheet works great for cracks caused by horizontal movement, they are not great for preventing cracks caused by vertical movement.


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It looks like your house is on a rise (assuming there is no hill hidden behind it in the picture). If that is the case then the water is probably coming in from below, which means there is a high water table there. If there are signs of moisture in the basement, it means flooding is frequent. To prevent this, you would have to build a drain all around the ...


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Without knowing what the interior drainage is now, it's not obvious that upgrading that will be of much benefit. If it's there, and water is coming through the walls, making more of it will probably not impact what's coming through the walls. If it's not actually defective/failed, replacing it seems like a probable waste of time & money. The exterior ...


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For insulation (either thermal or acoustic) use batt insulation between the joists (e.g. Roxull or other mineral wool type which seem better for sound insulation purposes). For additional soundproofing and a finished ceiling, you may want to consider a resilient channel ceiling, with some kind of removeable tiles (e.g. ...



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