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Smells high, but hard to be sure. Older and presumably less expensive implementations seen under sidewalks use more of a concrete grid with small pieces of frosted glass - better relative strength and modesty preserved, but no stargazing from the basement. And, if the glass was broken (it's usually quite robust) there's no chance of people falling through ...


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Yep. You can buy rubber "test plugs" of the appropriate size. They look like this one sold by Zoro Tools:


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To add to the already excellent answer already given... if humidity in your area is exceptionally high, some moisture will always tend to condense on the basement walls (they're cooler than the moisture-laden air). How wide is that gap? Poured bitumen MAY help, but may also make the situation worse... and you should know that pouring bitumen into the gap ...


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The correct term is laminating, then you should also toe-nail it. I could not find the nailing schedule for laminating 2x6's. Use 2 rows of 16d in a staggered pattern. Or go nuts and use bolts and nails. Consider adding brackets to all toe nailed areas (all four locations). If you don't own nor want to rent a framing nail gun, at least use deck screws, not ...


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If it were mine, I'd excavate access space around the partially covered walls, down to the footings, and hot-mop with roofing tar to a point slightly above finished grade... ESPECIALLY if you're going to apply sealer to the inside surface. You want to prevent hydrostatic pressure from pushing moisture into the wall from outside, and especially to prevent ...


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Your approach is sound. I wouldn't bother toeing screws in from top/bottom. I would drill through both the stud and the filler board and attach with nuts/bolts/washers (as opposed to threading a screw into the stud). Two bolts above the bar and two below. Alternatively you can attach horizontal 2x4's across your studs with recessed lag bolts and then mount ...


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An alternative would be to hang one horizontal 2x6, 16-1/2" long, horizontally between two adjacent studs. That wouldn't be as sturdy as two vertical "married" studs, though. Yep, Toeing, or toenailing if you do it with nails. Nails TEND to be better - they're not as hard, but they're stronger than most equivalent screws. Another alternative would be to ...


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Through-bolt it (with big washers on the backside) through a 2 x 10 or 2 x 12 (or lumber that you feel is appropriately strong),like 24" long, attached horizontally to your 18" OC studs. Basically span the stud bay.


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Olo, I'm a neighbor of yours (Vermont), so I know exactly what you're shooting for. Insulate the OUTSIDE of the basement, not the inside. Really. Insulating the outside leaves all that basement-wall mass as part of your place's thermal mass, lending thermal inertia, stabilizing your interior temperature. I allows the walls to attempt to reach the "earth ...


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I think it depends on the climate. This is information I got from construction contractors on this question.I found this question while looking to write a similar one on home cooling system that is energy efficient or non energy use. Environment Outside: 78-86 degrees and breezy in the summer. 55-60 in winter. Environment Inside house: with the heat at 80 ...


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When the construction is non-structural, then 1x furring strips can be used to attach the gypsum board. However, for a home theater, prioritizing acoustical performance may make more sense than prioritizing an inch or two of additional floor area - particularly given that furniture/equipment selection and arrangement is more directly related functional floor ...


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The short answer is maybe. When it comes to home improvement some people do very strange things. If you must be sure (you don't mention what you intend to do with this information which would be helpful) your best bet is to find a corner, maybe in a closet if there is one, and cut a small section of the sheet rock out, check it and patch. ---- Edit ...


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It's definitely a interpretation issue with the local inspectors. You can improve the installation in the picture by following the guidelines in 110.26 they may allow the wire within the working space about the panel to be not subject to damage but the water line should be rerouted to be outside the working space described in 110.26 also the wire should be ...


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A typical bathtub holds around 40 gallons, which equates to 8 pints of water, and since a pints a pound the world around, that means 320 pounds of water+you in the tub plus whatever part of you is above the waterline. If we estimate the surface area of the bottom of the tub at approximately 4' by 1.5' that's about 6 square feet or 864 square inches. That ...


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I run mine at 60% during the summer. I do not run it during the winter because dehumidifiers do not work well as temps below 60F. Also, I always pipe my dehumidifiers into the plenum sump pumps so they are self-emptying.


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Fresh air from outdoors is presumed to be lower in radon concentration than air that is trapped in the house. Any introduction of outside air will thus lower the radon concentration inside the house. The answer to your exact question depends on your goal: Are you trying to see the maximum possible concentration in your house? Then you should keep all ...


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I agree that emt is the way to go if corrosion is a big concern you can use straps that stand the conduit off of the wall with a plastic washer between the wall and strap or a non metalic strap that does the same. Personally I would use metal as opposed to pvc because if a fire did occur pvc produces poisonous smoke. I think this may be one of the reasons it ...


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I have removed these before. A cut at the bottom bar, which is not anchored into the sill the way the sides and head is. When cut, the 2 bottom corners can draw in, allowing the flanges on the sides to begin to withdraw from the groove they are mudded into. You may want to nick the upper inside corners to make it easier to bend inwards. They might even snap ...



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