New answers tagged

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For anyone looking to re-use their pipe, go rent a cast iron (soil) pipe cutter. It will not get it all the way down to the floor though: ~1" will be left proud. However, you'll need more room around the pipe than what this appears to have, to get the chain around it. They also work amazingly well on clay pipe.


1

The other answers hit the nail on the head--wood floors in basements or anywhere subject to moisture is generally a bad idea. I just wanted to add one more vinyl floor variant that you should consider for a basement installation if you are already considering a click-lock floor. I highly recommend loose lay vinyl tile. It is similar to click-lock vinyl ...


4

Honestly if you have a contractor talking about basement flooring in a basement were there is a fear of moisture I would fire him on the spot if he mentioned installing real wood floors. Even in a basement with no "water" problems the humidity levels can reek havoc on wood and warp it. I see a bad wood install in a basement a couple times a year. I can't ...


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Wood doesn't breathe at any rate I'd consider adequate. If there's moisture present, it's probably going to have problems itself. I'd put down heavy polyethylene sheeting under your foam. It's probably a good idea regardless of your flooring choice.


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End nailing into the brace will not be a useful and strong joint. Instead do something like the following where the brace is made of 2x lumber. Notch it as shown and set on edge and toe nailed from each side. Much stronger.


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I realize this is an old question, however I just wanted to mention something... Tester101 indicated not to drill too many holes within the joist, as it could weaken it and cause structural damage. I thought I should clarify something... The principal force that is applied to a floor joist is moment. With that, you get tensile along the bottom edge, and ...


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cut out a 3/4" spot where the valve used to be. use a 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/4" tee push fit valve. use sand paper to clean cut sides of pipe. push each side into copper tubing. reconnect a plastic line or use a 1/4" braided reconnect to humidifier. Go sit and drink beer.


6

I'll give you the same advice I give everybody about saddle valves... Replace it with a proper tee. Turn off the water. Drain the line. Cut the line so the tee will fit in. Install the tee. Install a shutoff on the leg of the tee feeding the humidifier. Install the pipe that feeds humidifier.


1

Hmm I thought saddle valves are not allowed by most plumbing codes. They are prone to clogging. It is probably scaled up. Do you have water in the holding tank of the humidifier? Close the valve all the way and remove the connector at the humidifier. Put the end into a bucket and open the valve to see if you get flow. If not the valve could be scaled over ...


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Is there any way you get some air moving through there? I would see if you can vent some of the air out of the area, or bring some drier air in. I am not sure of your DIY level, but you could also buy some of the heavy plastic sheeting and line it yourself. You can use bonding agents to make the joints at the seems, something along the lines of a plastic ...


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Fat and grease is another common enemy for drains. It might be hot/semi liquid when it goes into the drain but once it hits the colder sections outside it quickly cools and solidifies. This is sticky stuff and attracts debris, building up over time. Google (images) 'fat berg' if you totally want to be grossed out! It seems to be a fact of utility life that ...


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I know this is old but when renovating the first thing you should do is move this over to PVC. Second bolt some pvc collars to the side walls so you don't have the metal guides hanging down. Third build a 3/4 box around it and sandwich roxul against wall and around pipe. The roxul will insulate and it will also keep much more sound out than foam.


3

Yes they can, especially in exposed areas. I've heard of sewage pipes freezing in the winter and backing up into apartments in NYC, with disastrous consequences, though the more likely culprit is something that was poured down the drain. You could always pour some boiling water down the drain to see if it would help.


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Drain pipes are generally run below the "frost line" for the region, and should never freeze in anthing resembling a normal winter.


1

From the efflorescence on the walls, I'd bet there's slow steady seepage through the blocks and the mortar. The only solution for this would be an external entrenching and wrap. Also:


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Asbestos was mostly used to insulate pipes, not walls. Asbestos is very easy to recognize if you look at pictures on the internet. It is like bundles of very fine, hair-like fibers that look they are made of glass. They crinkle. If they bend smoothly they are not asbestos. Asbestos fibers crinkle. If you see a plasters (or fabric) with fine, clear bundles ...


1

Since it is a dwelling unit, and the metal is not a roof, then you can wire it like you would any other basement. PVC would be acceptable or MC cable. 1/2" to 1" PVC needs to be supported within 3 feet of a box and every 3 feet thereafter. MC cable needs to be supported within 12 inches of a box and every 6 feet thereafter. Although this may look pretty ...


1

I did a rehab on a warehouse this way, it's the way to go. Use metal EMT conduit and pull the common single-strand THHN wire. You don't have to pull a ground wire, the conduit is the ground (plus, it's screwed or clamped to the building). Use 3/4" conduit wherever you can, it costs little more and is a lot easier to pull wires through especially ...


1

The common way of doing this is to use conduit and surface mount all boxes. The conduit provides mechanical protection (especially important for a shop) and the nice thing about this it keeps everything accessible, in case you want to add lights or a power drop for a tool or something later. Alternatively, you may also be able to use MC (armored cable) ...


2

Yes, this allowed according to recent versions of the IRC building code. (If your state or region has a different building code you will need to look it up yourself or specify.) To quote the code: R310.1 Emergency escape and rescue required. Basements and every sleeping room shall have at least one operable emergency and rescue opening. Such opening ...


0

The only answer is to ask your inspector. I can't see why in any case this would pose a problem as you have doors. The whole point of the egress is accessibility. Your basement has to two points in two different areas and really whether you have a door there or not.


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If the red flaps on the red wall are doors, you should be fine, so long as the doors are and remain functional, and cannot be locked in the egress direction - i.e. from the "family room" to the office.


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The industry standards, the ANSI/IICRC S520 Standard of Care for professional mold remediation, generally stipulates removal of 24" around the visibly moldy area. We would also generally remove any other wet drywall. If you see visible mold on the room facing side of the drywall, the likelihood of the problem being worse inside the walls is high.


1

The sump pail is there precisely because you can't prevent water from coming in, at least under the slab. It's unclear whether your home has foundation waterproofing installed. It's also unclear why two sumps couldn't keep up. In all but the worst scenarios, one pump should be adequate, and it should only run every few minutes at most. If you have pumps ...


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There is nothing you can do, short of digging a drainage channel around the entire house which goes down to the bottom of the foundation and is then drained somewhere, which obviously has to be deeper than the foundation of your house. Normally in the situation you describe that is not possible, either because no such drain exists deep enough, or because the ...


3

These nails are not meant to sink even with the wood. If your framing is done right these nails should provide nothing more than bump resistance for the wall. Your framing should be very snug to joists and let the wood get itself straight. Meaning that the nails at the plates don't do much. When I am framing a basement I usually put in 3 per 8' board. ...


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For form leftovers like this we usually hit them with the angle grinder and then go back and forth with pliers until it snaps at wall. I wouldn't just directly hammer these as you might be surprised at how big of a chunk of wall you take out with it.


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They look like the form clips where large forms were held in place to pour the walls. They can be handy as anchors if you add furring strips to drywall the walls instead of drilling for supports. They were just there for the pour and can be removed.


4

They're left over from the forming system the contractor used. You may remove them by striking them sideways with a hammer or repeatedly bending them with any other tool. They're hardened steel and will snap off.


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If this is a base plate on the floor for a wall, you're fine as is and it pretty much happens to everyone. The nail is embedded in concrete, the floor keeps the base plate from moving lower, the nail's job is to keep it from moving side to side, and the wall you build on top of it is what will keep it from lifting up the small distance you see there. I ...


4

I will guarantee you that plate will stay there until somebody pulls it up. There is a good bury on the nail point, you could strike it with a hammer if the plate is stable. If plate vibrates, there is a strong possibility that the nail will blow out a big chip and the nail will loose what hold it had. To solve it, use a red load, that should get it down ...


0

I always seem to have this problem with powder setting. I have one of the hammer actuated ones like this one (it quite possibly is that one -- I haven't had it out in a while): What I usually do is load another charge in the gun and fire it over the same nail to set it. As far as the safety of doing this with any particular tool goes, my disclaimer is ...


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I ended up skipping the second coat. I went around a touched up a few spots with a brush using the same paint and it looks great otherwise.



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