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1

There should be no issues as long as you reinforce the floor with some joists, preferably connected to existing floor joists or the foundation. It would be no different than a basement under your bathroom.


1

No this is not okay - especially for a new house. If the builder is saying it is okay, run away from this house because you have no idea what else they have screwed up. You can't put a post on a slab if it is structural (i.e. not decorative). A concrete slab is not designed (and shouldn't be) to handle structural loads like this. The concrete looks fine. ...


0

Run away and do not look back. Anyone showing a new home with a flaw such as this is waiting to sell someone a "bridge". This is a text book scenario of Buyer Beware


3

One thing that I have learned in my short life, is that when you are buying a house, always put in clauses so you can get out/get money removed from the asking price if something like this is found to be wrong. With a home inspectors and an engineers opinions, you may be able to get a sizable portion of the price of the house knocked off. Not an expert ...


1

I'd like to add another vote for "this looks bad". To proceed with buying the house, get a written report from an engineer and they use that to get it fixed, or get an allowance at closing to get it fixed. Are there other support poles that the same thing could happen to?


0

You don't give very much information, but just looking at the photo the "foundation" looks like crap. It looks like it is way too thin and the concrete is cheap. Of course, that is the construction style in America now, build crap houses out of crap plywood on crap "slabs" 2-inches thick then wire the whole thing with crap Romex and plumb it with crap PEX ...


4

This may be a problem or non-problem depending on the foundation construction. You'll be much better off consulting an expert who knows how foundations are built in your area and how to diagnose them. One option is that the foundation is designed with separate large thick concrete pads that bear the load and then the space between them is filled with ...


7

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


28

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


5

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


17

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


1

Generally speaking, it's best to keep the relative humidity level between 35% and 55% for hardwood floors (and that's also a comfortable range for most people). You need a humidistat to measure this upstairs where the floor is. Over a couple of days, keep checking and adjusting your dehumidifier to get the humidity within that range. The actual number on ...


2

You can use nonmetallic sheathed cable in basements, as long as you follow a few rules. If you're using 12 AWG cable, and you're installing the cable at angles to the joists. You'll have to pull the cable through bored holes, or along running boards. You cannot staple the cable along the bottom of the joist. When you come down the wall, you'll have to ...


1

If the window is flange mounted you have to be careful how much you trim. You need enough flange to secure the window. Most vinyl windows I have installed have a "C" shaped profile on the outside edges. If the window is secured by screws through the sides of the frame you can trim the edges. Depending on the amount to be trimmed I have used a utility knife ...


0

Nogging in the UK. These do the same job as herringbone bracing in between floor joists i.e. they stiffen up the wall and also stop the studs twisting (in theory). They are commonly placed as in the picture but also either side of the marked line. Staggering then thus makes for easier nailing (straight instead of skewed). If I remove a nogging I'd try to ...


-1

To prevent basement mold you should minimize moisture. Must hire a professional mold service to remove mold growing in the basement, especially if the mold growth is large.


1

You can't reliably waterproof a basement from the inside. You can't reliably waterproof a basement 'relatively cheaply'. The only sure way to waterproof a foundation and at the lowest cost is to properly waterproof it on the exterior before you back fill. Barring that, you need to accept that fact that most basements may get wet at some point. Given ...


3

The new information has radically changed my perception of the actual problem. Preventing moisture movement through the foundation won't help. Instead, it is cold temperatures outside causing condensation inside: No matter how well sealed the foundation, the problem will persist. A much less expensive solution may have several parts which can be mixed and ...


0

It is very unusual (and usually obvious that it's NOT the case by inspection around the edges) for the floor to be in any way supporting the walls. Normally, it's footings, then walls, THEN floor; and the floor is not in any way tied to the walls. There are a few buildings with "bathtub" foundations, but they tend to be major projects floated (somewhat ...


3

Well, a (concrete slab) floor is just a floor, supported by its substrate. You may have some subsidence afterwards, so I'd advise my tips here, especially the one about undermining it a little to lock it all in place once you re-pour. Rebar is a must. Done right*, I have no concern for the foundation. I'd be worried that there's a pocket under the slab ...


2

As wallyk mentioned, the best way to seal a basement from moisture is from the outside. Sealing it from the outside is the most foolproof way to fix the problem since it diverts water away from your entire foundation instead of just trying to prevent penetration. Going from the outside is not always an option for many homeowners. It is extremely costly. ...


2

The best solution is to waterproof the foundation from the outside. Dig around the outside deep enough. This can be done inexpensively yourself or by offering local teenagers a few bucks or your buddies a few beers and pizza. Beware of sprinkler plumbing, utilities, etc. With the foundation exposed: Apply an appropriate exterior foundation sealant but ...


0

My Dad and I always used this Drylok. It doesn't cover much per gallon but it works pretty well.


0

@Ecnerwal's answer is very correct... contact an engineer. In my case I contacted someone from the local government (permit office), and they were able to run the numbers for me. In my particular case, I am using (2) 9¼" x 1¾" Mircolams. What went into the calculation was the number of floors this wall is supporting and the length of the rafters over top.


1

Probably not a good idea. Clothes washing machines generally discharge a large volume of water at a high rate, the drain apparatus is built with a standpipe (either inside the wall or outside where you can see it) to accommodate the volume. The standpipe holds the water long enough for it to drain without overflowing. Alternatively, a laundry tub/sink is ...


0

I've been reading a lot on this because I'm trying to figure out what I'll do on my addition. The best way might be to insulate with foam the whole exterior down past the sill plate. You'd probably want aluminum flashing underneath the bottom of the foam near the ground to keep insects from crawling up to it. I'm assuming you have a foot + on the outside ...


6

The blocks are known as Dwangs or Nogs here, and was confused about what blocks you were asking about. But they are used for stiffening the wall and attaching drywall, as well as mounting points for basins etc. Not heard of them being used for firestopping, and does not make a lot of sense to me. Recommendation from BRANZ (local building regulation ...


6

Typical of firestopping, so that (when sheeted with drywall) flames cannot run the full height of the wall inside the stud bay. It would be better to move (up or down a few inches), rather than remove the blocking, for that reason. While it may be unfinished at present, the builders presumably intended that it be ready for drywall if/when you or some other ...


9

Can't say for sure why they did it in your situation, without knowing a bit more details. Typically blocking is installed to prevent framing members from twisting or warping, and to stiffen and add strength to the wall. Though it's also common to install blocking, where fire stops are required by code. Blocking can also provide an attachment point for ...


0

The grating seems like the best solution. Not only will it increase the surface area of the drain, but also aids in cleaning the steps/landing because it can be picked up in one piece, taken to the top of the steps, and shaken off. However metal grating can be expensive, hard to work with, find in the correct size/hole size, and most importantly, will rust ...


5

Cutting a hole in your foundation almost always requires an engineer, and is almost never a do-it-yourself project. You'll need an engineer, to tell you how to carry the load around the opening. And you'll likely need tools and knowledge you don't have, to actually cut the hole.


1

Comment from: What should I consider when cutting/making a window in a concrete foundation? I wouldn't do this without an L shaped metal lintel on the inside to support the load above and also prevent crack/total failure of the veneer. My only thought would be to cut the hole for the window then immediately move to the interior of the home and cut a ...


0

WaterGuard was an enhancement to round plastic pipe or actual drain tile as it was shaped to fit on the footing (in cases of monolithic floors a different product would be used). It's been around for about 25 years and is effective and clog resistant as it sits out of the mud on the footer and has access ports for visible checking and cleaning. WaterGuard's ...


0

Having vapor barriers in most basement environments is a really bad idea. Really these only are a good idea in extremely cold environments or when a basement is truly a "basement" - meaning it is completely below ground level. It is highly likely that water is saturating your foundation and then not drying quickly because of the vapor barrier. But there ...



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