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Your inspector should be able to grant a waiver for existing conditions if code compliance is a concern. If that is the case, I would wait and ask him/her for a solution that is acceptable. Hopefully something a bit shy of bumping the basement wall out 6", LOL. You could put the 1/2" foam behind, than cover the pipes with split foam pipe insulation. I try ...


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Cut the foam into manageable pieces and slide into place. Use cans of spray foam insulation to fill the cracks in the sheets of foam caused by cutting. Or spray foam the entire cavity and forget the rigid foam.


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Given multiple issues there, I think the correct and possibly simplest, albeit messy, solutiion is going to be cutting the floor open and putting the pipes where you need them. Concrete is not forever.


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If you can identify that the basement dampness comes principally from the wall on that side of the house, then you may find dampness abated by creating a water/moisture barrier between the wall and ground; or at ground level, preventing run-off from entering the fissure. If you have a dirt floor in the basement, chances are that the moisture comes up ...


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You can always spray foam over top edge of the wall layer of XPS, this ensures that there's no air leakage from behind the XPS on the wall going up. I'd also make sure you caulk/tape all seams between XPS boards, and spray the bottoms/corners so it gets a real good seal from air movement.


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Unless the existing window is leaking, the sole criterion for judging better and worse options in this case is the likelihood of future bulk water infiltration. The current installation is performing functionally and aesthetically as part of the building envelope. Breaching and patching the envelope is not a repair, and at best will only perform equally ...


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If you just bury it, it's a potential leak and/or maintenance hassle waiting to bite you later. And hiding it makes noticing, finding, and fixing the problem harder when that happens. I have several windows under my own porch (with security bars, which I consider absolutely necessary in that situation!), and am seriously considering closing them off ...


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There's no problem per-se with covering it up. However, with a windows there's lots of chances there for leaks. And since you can't see the window from the outside and it will be behind a wall inside, you probably won't be able to see any evidence of damage or leaks until it's too late and caused significant damage to your new walls and flooring. Based on ...



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