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I wanted to comment but I don't have the rep so: I live in Germany where it rains a lot. Our house is built on clay. The basement used to be really damp - it would run down the walls. So here is what I did: Dry it from the outside - dig down the outside of the wall, a trench about 60 cm wide, let it dry, paint with bitumen and fill the gap with pebbles so ...


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"Perfectly up to par" is an interpretation of the report. What the report will state is what the professionals observed. If there was no destructive investigation then hidden conditions were not observed. If there was no monitoring for a particular airborne contaminant, then none was observed. Reports are written based on what the professionals were paid to ...


19

I have experience buying similar houses. Basically GrowOps have the following issues: Electrical redone to support lights and equipment Ventilation rerouted through places where it shouldn't Plant and smoke smell throughout the house (if they are growing most of the time there are lots of people smoking). Moisture inside drywall In your case you are ...


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GrowOps often use excessive amounts of electric power and water, which can cause those sytems to prematurely fail. They may be wired incorrectly to support higher loads. GrowOps often smell like their product. There may be water/moisture damage 'interesting' people may visit, based on the house's past use.


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I worked on a job where they did just what you are describing - only on a large, 3 story turn of the century home of perhaps 10,000 sf. A number of guys dug for more than 3 months under the building, and they used one of these conveyor belt setups. But as mentioned above, this is potentially a very dangerous undertaking. These were professional builders ...


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The standard (as much as there is one) technique for this these days is to jack the house up to the point that smaller power equipment (which is not cheap) such as a skid-steer loader can be used - and so that the basement walls can be removed (with the house supported on blocking) and replaced with new ones to full depth, properly supported on footings. ...


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You can't frame out in 1x3 especially in a basement. It is just too flimsy and and warping with probably make it brittle. If you want to save an inch or two (which you will never notice) then please frame in 2x3. You won't have any issues with 2x3s (other than having to install shallow electrical boxes in some cases). Note: Watched the video on the ...


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Where are you located? Unless you are in an extremely cold climate what you are suggesting is a waste of money. I noticed that you said you wanted to change the insulation (which I doubt gives you a noticeable difference yet you have no insulation over the header in between your joists. About 70-80% of your heat loss in a basement is happening right ...


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It's not so much a vapor barrier that you need as an air barrier. The moisture is carried on air, so if you block off the basement walls from air movement, you've all but eliminated moisture transport. Vapor diffusion is dramatically overestimated, and besides, most of the foams are very vapor closed anyway. No need for an additional dedicated vapor barrier ...


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From a building science perspective, the polystyrene itself is a suitable vapor barrier, if you seal the seams and edges appropriately.


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I know this is an old question but you would us a modified thinset and tile. NO NO NO you do not use mastic for a basement floor. Next time it flood you will have tile/asbestos coming up. If this option wasn't discussed with you then you had the wrong contractors.


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Since all you need to do is keep out air here (not actually insulate it), and you need it to be durable to the elements and fauna, I'd suggest filling that gap with mortar or quick-setting concrete. Once it's fully sealed up on the exterior, you can go inside and seal up any remaining gap with Great Stuff or another kind of expanding spray foam, or even ...


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I had the same problem on one side of the house. I even dug down by hand on the outside to the bottom of the foundation and put a few pieces of drainage pipe into the ground, to motivate the water to drain away from the foundation. It did not solve the problem. In the end, I was successful with a combination of measures: I put a 4-foot wide concrete apron ...


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The simple answer is no, it is impossible to waterproof a cinderblock wall by filling the cavity. Personally, I don't consider Drylock to be a permanent solution as it has a time-limited warranty and hydrostatic water pressure limits. The most optimal solution is to keep water away, prevent it from ever coming in contact with your foundation - then Drylock ...


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According to http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/cleaning/ and http://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/technical/hps/faq.html hantavirus stays infectious for only a few days. Let the droppings sit for a while (and thoroughly dry out), then vacuum them.


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Filling the cavities in cinder block will not make the wall waterproof. The cinder block material at the block webs and the mortar joints will still be permeable and allow moisture through to the inside. If you have serious problems with moisture ingress into your basement the proper fix is take care of a number of things: 1) For most sites the proper ...


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I'd do the floor first. You'll have an easier time with the wall and you won't have to try to level against wooden studs.


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Use some self-leveling mortar or concrete. It's a mortar/concrete that is liquid. You pour it out, and help it a bit and it levels itself automatically. If the slope is extreme (more than an inch or two), then get it semi-close (but lower) with some regular concrete, then finish with the self leveling stuff. You say joists, but are these joists actually ...


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It doesn't matter unless it is really far off. Also leveling isn't a must do.


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I have a basement room with almost the exact dimensions. You walk in the basement from stairs and basement starts in almost a corner (3/4 basement) and then you walk almost the width of the house and it is about 14 feet wide. I have 4 cans right when you get in the basement on one switch by basement door and then a square zone of 4 in the back of the room ...


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The amount of light should be determined by the use of the space. Unwelcoming (and unused) basements are usually dungeon-like (too dark). Use multiple switches or dimmers to can control how bright the room is. Another option is to use wall sconces. Some considerations for you: The brain can easily detect small changes in pattern, so make sure that the ...


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That is a big room to be done in all recessed all on one switch. I'd break it up into switched groups or areas. Use your judgement as to how many. I would probably do more than you, like 8 or even 12, but it is your room and you need to be happy with it.


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I use a standalone humidity reducer in the wettest room of my house. I've used one in a finished basement too, when it got too damp down there we ran it. For about $100 USD you can get a decent dehumidifier that plugs into a regular wall socket. It works by pulling water from the air. They also produce heat, which will raise the room temperature a little ...



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