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You'll want to look at how deep that sloped concrete block is to the outside, and what's on the other side. Also, investigate how the home is insulated above this. I try to keep the insulation barrier continuous between floors to eliminate paths between the insulation to the inside of the home. A rim joist, like exterior sheathing, is a poor insulator by ...


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Probably won't make any noticeable difference. Normally the bottom of the water tank portion is insulated if electric, and not remotely in contact with the floor if fuel-fired (there's a burner between the bottom of the tank and the floor, and a substantial amount of space taken up by the burner assembly.) I'd save the idea until you were replacing the ...


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Based on your clarifying comments, I come to the same conclusion that you have...it's the concrete slab that's the issue. By the sounds of it, it's actually routing water towards your foundation. I had this exact same problem at my previous house. One side of the house had a concrete slab. Unfortunately, whoever poured it did a terrible job. By the time we ...


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First thing to look at is to make sure the patio and landscaping are graded so water falling on them tends to run away from/around the house rather than toward it, so water isn't being actively directed toward the basement wall. After that, you're looking at some combination of waterproofing the foundation, french drains, sump pump if you need to bring ...


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Call Mike Holmes. But seriously, he had a great show in which he has a very similar problem - we are talking 8 foot by 3' trenches around entire basement, waterproof cladding, rock, dirt barrier cloth and back fill. In a nut shell - your attempt to get the water away from those exterior walls is a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, there may be ...


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It's best if you can figure out where the water is coming from and try to stop it. A lot of times you can solve these sorts of problems easily and cheaply from the outside. Check the gutters and downspouts to make sure they are clear and divert the water at least 6' from the building. Make sure the ground is properly sloped around the outside. If there are ...


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The proper solution would be drainage tiles around the foundation of the exterior walls and proper grading, this way the water would never enter the space in the first place. However, digging up the exterior of the house often isn't a viable option, so the next best thing would be an interior French drain that drains into a sump pit, along with a sump pump ...


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Keep it simple, buy a wet/dry shop vac and suck up the water with it occasionally. Cost you about $60.


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First off, your friend should definitely talk to his landlord about the flooding. Even if the landlord won't address it, it's possible your friend could be held liable for water damage from the flooding if he doesn't notify the landlord. There are two big differences between the pump you need here and a normal sump pump. The first is that it won't be run ...


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In my house, a square piece of insulating board is up against the rim joist at the end of the bay and great stuff has been used around the edges of the insulating board. (My house was built in late 1800s) edit: if you don't use foam, there's really no insulating value - insulation really only happens when air movement is halted. 2nd edit: foam is cheap. ...


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It will say on the can of paint what the cure time is. The concrete has to be cured about 30 days to apply concrete paint. But the room also has to be dryer than a normal basement. I would run a dehumidifier for a week or so before you paint or if you have heat in the basement turn it on. Some concrete paints need to have a primer/sealer put down if it ...


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The 'Mike Holmes' way is also the Building Science Corporation's recommendation--though they don't recommend any formal vapor barrier--just XPS and tape. The idea is that XPS is a vapor retarder, but can ultimately dry one way or the other if it ever has to. That said, if you are absolutely 100% sure your basement will be forever dry, it probably doesn't ...


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That's fine. The thing you want to make sure is that you seal off any air paths from the inside of the basement to the rim joist, the reason being that if you insulate it but let humid air hit it, that air can condense on it and cause rot. That's why they tell you to use rigid foam--which is an air barrier--instead of something like air-permeable fiberglass ...


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Yes, you are in an excellent position to add a basement bathroom. Definitely involve a competent plumber in this process. Properly venting and properly attaching the new waste drains to the existing waste drain will be important to prevent the basement bathroom traps from being sucked dry when waste is leaving the upper floors. This is an easy part to mess ...


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Please keep in mind that headers are made to absorb some of the twist and vibration when someone decides a door needs to be slammed, leaned against to keep out little/big brother/sister, and other abuse. I would build as you suggested, and if it becomes a wall cracking/splitting issue near the door frame, then make a header with a double 2x4 or 2x6 instead ...


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Just to add what Ecnerwal is saying - and he is 100% correct - I often use pocket doors in basements with lower clearance. You can screw pocket door frame directly to the joists and save and inch or two.


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This is perfectly fine. There is in fact a whole building science based protocol for not using double top plates or double studs even on structural walls. If the name comes back to me I'll provide a link to it. Advanced Framing. Developed 40+ years ago and still not accepted by half the carpenters who learned from daddy who learned from daddy who...learned ...


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If the room above is warm and the cellar is cold, the batts were installed upside down if the paper face is towards the cold (cellar) side. The batts mostly fall from being full of condensation (water) when in that orientation. In any case batts should have more support on a ceiling than just the backing, whether that be wooden laths or sheetrock. Replace, ...


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Dave, I see what you mean about sealing outside first, then inside, but what about sub-grade (outside)? You can't get to it to seal it and that lower party of the foundation wall is where all the water weeps in anyways. ...?


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Any trap that has been installed, can also be removed and replaced, albeit at some effort and expense. Have your plumbers replace any piping that needs it, and send the bill to your shoddy tiling contractor. If he/she balks, you may have to resort to legal action. Take good photos of the mess, and get sworn statements from the plumbers. Dumping acid and ...


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Spray foam would not be either an ideal or recommended procedure to cover up all the wires where they exit from the main power panel. The first moment when some electrical problem needs troubleshooting, you need to add a new circuit or an existing wire needs moving you will be cussing that you ever thought of spraying in foam in this area.


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I would caulk on both of them. The purpose of the caulk it to prevent air leaks and convection, and not sealing both will reduce the effectiveness of the insulation a bit.



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