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1

What state are you in? You should check out the span tables for your local code. Generally, for that span outlined in the drawings above, you should be safe with triple 2 x 12s, providing you use grade no. 1 lumber. A less conservative header size might be possible, though. A laminated beam is also a valid option. These codes take climate and real life loads ...


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Header requirements must be determined based on an understanding of the entire structure an the superimposed gravity, wind, seismic, snow, and other loads. Generally, it would be prudent for a person to have experience with these things when preparing a design.


1

Given that setup, I can't think of any reason you'd need to draw inside air. On the other hand, I'm not sure you want it entirely at outside temperature, from the point of view of freezing risk when not circulating. (Then again, I'm in a northerly climate; you may not be.) Did the folks who installed it have any opinion on this approach? Make sure there's ...


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We can only guess at this point, but one theory is that when it rains, you have water seeping down the outside of your foundation until it hits the footer, at which point it's seeping into your basement. At the point where you have this puddle, what is outside? Is there a gutter downspout there? Or perhaps the ground is sloping towards your house at that ...


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You will need to have to provide proper strain relief of the flexible cord that drops down: (from the NEC) *368.56(B) Cord and Cable Assemblies. Suitable cord and cable assemblies approved for extra-hard usage or hard usage and listed bus drop cable shall be permitted as branches from busways for the connection of portable equipment or the connection ...


2

Do you know the temperature of steam pipes? Do you know the ignition point of wood? Some say the "ignition" point of wood is 451 deg F. Most say around 570 deg F. Either way, the surface temperature of steam pipes will NEVER even get close to that. Typically upwards of 250 deg F. I think you can trust your plumber on this one.


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Here's what comes to mind: Increasing air flow, using fans - on both sides if possible. Applying a product that will extract the moisture (sorry, no idea if such a product exists - maybe someone else knows of one). Increasing the heat of the area to encourage moisture evaporation. This can be accomplished with conventional heaters, heating bars, or using ...


1

You can put a vapor/moisture barrier up over rigid foam. A lot of new construction in the far north has this as a default. The idea is that you frame right outside of that. In that framing you are allotting a cavity to which moisture can move and evaporate. Now if you are putting rockwool or other types of insulation in your framing then no you do not ...


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If you used a licensed HVAC installer, you should have a furnace warranty through the manufacturer. I'd suggest you call the manufacturer to get warranty support. You'll need the registration card that came with the furnace (unless you mailed it in already - that's fine), serial number, model number, and the name and number of your installer. I'd inform ...


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Use expanding foam. You can paint it as it's not very pretty.


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Since it is constantly filling, then it sounds like you either have a really high water table, or there is a natural spring nearby. Either way, you have a big problem on your hands. You should find the source of the water and mitigate it before doing any further construction. They ran into this problem on one of the homes they were building on Hometime and ...


1

It all depends on what type of foundation it is, i.e. cement pad, basement, crawl space? Was there water present when the footers were being poured? Is there a crawl space or basement? How deep are the footers?


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tl;dr: If the inspector is happy and calls it normal, stop worrying. There is always going to be some ground water, and any of that above the bottom of your excavation will tend to flow into the excavation since that's its easiest route. That doesn't mean there's going to be enough pressure behind it to bother the foundation once you have it completed, ...


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Sounds like you didn't use a concrete floor paint. There are only a few kind of paints that can stand up to the harsh conditions of a basement floor. Best thing you can do is try removing what is there and then applying the proper type of paint. What you have will just continue to peel.


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First it sounds like you used a latex paint which for a basement floor is not a good solution. You need to use the messier, oil based paint. This will soak into the concrete a bit and are a lot more durable. This paint will continue to have problems when wet - especially with hot water or when scraped by something sharp or heavy. Also at the 3 week ...



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