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3

Yes. RV antifreeze (propylene glycol) is also said to work well. Anything that doesn't evaporate, doesn't rot, and isn't damaging to the plumbing or the environment will do. You could also stop them with rubber mats, test plugs, or rags, as appropriate.


2

One possible solution would be to get a clear plexiglass panel, cut it to size and seal it on the window. You can either build a "dam" blocking the lower half of the window, or seal the whole surface and make it waterproof. Of course, air flow in this case will be completely blocked, which may be a problem (and in some jurisdictions, illegal - where I live ...


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Short term solution: use solid concrete blocks and polyurethane caulk (like you have between the sidewalk and house.) to build a dam in front of the window. Blocks ar available in various sizes and you could use some 8" ones on edge to build an 8" dam if you think it needs to be that tall. Long term solution: remove part of the sidewalk and install a drain ...


2

Those "straight lines" are control joints (as opposed to expansion joints). The contractor knows that concrete slabs invariably crack, and they install those to make the cracks less conspicuous. That said, you do seem to have more cracks than I'd have expected, and they appear more open than is typical. The one is oddly close to the exterior wall. I'd ask ...


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Totally not a problem - if it was a problem, the sump would be overflowing and you'd be asking about the flood. The force of a stream of water coming in from a side pipe to a sump is quite minor compared with the force of the collected water pushing up on the float. Assume that it DID affect operation - once the water had risen to the level of the pipe, ...


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I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


1

To me, this seems like a "penny-wise, pound-foolish" place to save a few pennies. But then, I tend to rip out carpets and replace them with hard surfaces. Consider that whatever spills, grunge or general nastiness that got through the old carpet are in the pad - and consider that the pad is already somewhat compressed in the wear areas. You're giving away ...


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There is no place in the code book that I can recall that requires 12" centers for a bearing wall. You can move over the studs to a 16" center, rather than making a header. If you choose to. The drywall will make it a little tough to do that...


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Wow that was a long question! First welcome to the stack exchange , now to try to answer your questions. First if you want to spend just a little $ and do trim and framing Don't get a jig saw! Your cuts will not be square. A chop saw that can tilt can be purchased for a few more $ and it can cut square 2x4's and miter cuts. Chop saws cannot rip lumber and I ...


1

I am not sure about your location. If you are in the far north it is a great policy to insulate your basement floors - rigid foam sheets and OSB is certainly a great way to do it and probably the easiest. However if you are in a mixed climate, I am not sure what you are looking for out of the insulated floor. The energy savings will not be there as cool ...


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I wouldn't recommend bonding sill plates directly to a concrete floor. Any wood in direct contact with basement concrete is asking for trouble. Concrete is porous and will wick moisture to anything placed on top of it. In order to prevent moisture wicking into the sill plate and consequent danger of mould, mildew, and rot, it's better to lay a 12" wide sheet ...


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I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...



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