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9

In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


5

When modifying load bearing walls and betting your house on the results, you are well served to hire a civil engineer to analyze the situation and tell you what will work, rather than guessing. It should not be terribly expensive.


3

As long as the concrete and some time after pouring to set up, water won't hurt anything (they make swimming pools out of concrete). Granted, you'll want it all pumped out and dried out before framing, though. As for the wood, no real damage should come about after 5 week of being exposed to the weather. You certainly don't want to leave your framing ...


2

I have a basement floor that is concrete. When we finished it off, we used a product called DriCore as the sub floor. This is a plywood with a plastic bottom. It's specifically designed for basements, and it raises the floor a little bit. The disadvantage is that you essentially do the floor twice. :) Also the cost is higher. With that said I have ...


2

If you were in a really dry region, it might be overkill, but window wells and covers also help protect basement windows from physical damage (stuff the mower throws, ornery pets, etc). That said, two inches isn't terribly much, and installing them would probably be prudent if you planned to raise the grade around the window with flower beds or something. ...


2

Any area that contains water lines should be heated if temps hit freezing where you live. Crawl spaces without insulation should also be heated in these climates particularly if you have non-carpeted floors above them to avoid cold floors in the winter. Also, I'm not an HVAC expert, but I've been told you should condition the air through which uninsulated ...


2

There's typically a drainage system around the inside perimeter of the basement (perimeter drain), which feeds into the sump pit. If the pump is not removing water, the drains will fill just the same as the pit. Water always finds level, so if it's above the rim of the pit, it's also filled the drains. So theoretically, water could seep in anywhere ...


1

To be honest it just depends on how many cfm of duct work u already have installed in your home your unit is designed to cary 1200 cfm of air at 3 tons so if you've already reached 1200 cfm you would not have the capacity to supply another vent unless you had one room that stays cooler than the rest that you could downsize the duct on to provide you with the ...


1

I'd say maybe you don't, if it doesn't have any exterior walls, which it does, so that's a yes. Drywall is the enemy. This is also a good time to upgrade any of the electrical on the interior walls as well. You're two steps from a gut job; go for it. As to whether you need more registers elsewhere, I don't know; I'm not a math wiz: calculate the heat load ...


1

Option 1 - tapcon screws (or similar) into the solid parts of the block. Option 2 - stuff some wire mesh a few inches down the holes. Mix a very stiff mortar/concrete, place on top of the mesh, make a lovely smooth flat surface, and drop in some anchor bolts (probably overkill for a windowframe) or just screw the board in with tapcons or the like but ...



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