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From the comments it sounds like you have drywall on one side. I'd set up a measuring jig to give consistent, square cuts, and cut your batts to length so that they fit well horizontally. Stack them in the stud spaces. If necessary, apply a sheeting over it to give additional support. Something with a textured surface might be preferable to polyethylene ...


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This completely depends on your expectations. I paint my room every 5-6 years with the basic grey basement paint. It scratches, you mop with hot water or bleach, it peels. Not too bad but after a few years it doesn't look perfect, but certainly better than the dirty, rusty concrete that was there before it. And I have a full squat rack and 800 pounds ...


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I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


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Searching Google for 24" denim batts turned up a ton of options that are available. Here is an example. Using this will be WAY easier than trying to hack 16" stuff together. If you are pretty intent on going with 16", you could try placing the insulation in the cavity and then stapling 24" wide paper like this over it to hold it in place. If I were doing ...


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Short term solution: use solid concrete blocks and polyurethane caulk (like you have between the sidewalk and house.) to build a dam in front of the window. Blocks ar available in various sizes and you could use some 8" ones on edge to build an 8" dam if you think it needs to be that tall. Long term solution: remove part of the sidewalk and install a drain ...


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I wouldn't recommend bonding sill plates directly to a concrete floor. Any wood in direct contact with basement concrete is asking for trouble. Concrete is porous and will wick moisture to anything placed on top of it. In order to prevent moisture wicking into the sill plate and consequent danger of mould, mildew, and rot, it's better to lay a 12" wide sheet ...


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I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


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Wow that was a long question! First welcome to the stack exchange , now to try to answer your questions. First if you want to spend just a little $ and do trim and framing Don't get a jig saw! Your cuts will not be square. A chop saw that can tilt can be purchased for a few more $ and it can cut square 2x4's and miter cuts. Chop saws cannot rip lumber and I ...


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Turn off the main supply and connect the supply line(s) to the faucet. You will need a brass tee, crimps, and the connector for the pipe to the faucet, and some pipe. If you want to use a silcock instead of a sink, you still need to attach it to something. I would start there (build something to hold the silcock), and attach the pipe to it once I figured ...


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If you're not going to use a 2-pack epoxy, don't paint your floor. You'll hate yourself later. A 2-pack is a paint-like product that comes in 2 cans, you mix it in a certain proportion, and you have a limited time to apply it. Regular paint will fail. And I don't mean "will come off in nice sheets you can peel up, oh no. Other than the failing spots, ...



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