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3

Depending on the size, weight would be my only structural concern. A large window well filled only with concrete is going to weigh a ton. That could potentially put unwanted pressure on the foundation. The windows should be blocked/bricked in, add some below grade sealer/barrier (whatever the foundation of the building is made of), the hole filled with ...


2

2X12 is great, 3/4" plywood would be easier to handle and to drill through when you need to. Chalk your plate line where the wall will go on the room side, rip your plywood to go to the basement wall and 1/4" shy of the chalk line. That way when you set your upper plate you can still see the line to accurately set your wall. To answer your question, using ...


1

Instead of temporary forms, make permanent ones. Cut a 2x4 in to a wedge shape, apply a thick bead of silicone down the middle of the underside, and screw them down with masonry screws. Once the silicone sets, fill your forms with cement. Now you have a nice level permanent pad for your machines.


1

You'd want to use a products like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Quikrete-1-qt-Concrete-Crack-Seal-864000/100318507 It'll be hard to get concrete mix into such a small hole without leaving a void. This crack sealer is designed for smaller holes & cracks. Documentation here: http://www.quikrete.com/PDFs/Projects/RepairingConcrete.pdf


1

1, 2, 4 or the variant of 4 that is a raised perforated pipe; or the variant of 1 & 4 that is cutting a hole for a large filter-basket below the current floor level - but you probably don't need to "clean it every time it rains" - in all liklihood, checking it once a week or so and cleaning it as needed will suffice, with a possible need to check more in ...


1

Where do you live? If the plan is to use the space as living space, most code will require a minimum ceiling height. That's usually 7'. So you either have to accept that you can only use a portion of the crawlspace, or you have to dig down deeper. To dig down deeper, you need to bring in a structural engineer to figure out how to underpin the existing ...


1

I know that my answer will not be a proper one (ok, you may downvote if you wish...), but my experience tells me that it's a serious problem. Cracks on walls always tell that something serious is around. My advice is to find a civil engineer/specialist to make a proper judgement of this matter. I strongly reccomend that, and I guess that this question will ...


1

Those are not cracks. It is where the concrete was poured and had a chance to set for a while, perhaps while another part of the foundation was being poured. The concrete chute or hose then returned to the area in question, and resumed pouring, allowing the coarser aggregate to show at the joint. It may also be a cold joint, where concrete was started, ...


1

Sikaflex or similar is the standard, however that gap seems pretty thin. Is it less than 1/4"? You can get this in a self leveling format or not. My best guess would be to not have the self leveling due to not being able to insert a backer rod to prevent the caulking from dripping too deep into the gap.


1

Current state of the art is a dimpled drainage mat applied against the foundation and lapped over the footing, with a drainage pipe at the bottom to carry off water. The pipes can drain to daylight if there's enough slope on your lot, to a sump pit, or to the sewer/waste plumbing if that's legal in your location. The whole thing looks like this:



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