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26

Pretty easy DIY job. All you'll need is: a hammer, old metal putty knife, utility knife, small pry bar, pliers, and a pencil. For reinstallation, a finish nail gun really makes the job go fast, and a nail set is also useful. The typical procedure: Cut away any caulk on the top edge and corners. Check any inside corners to see if they are coped rather than ...


14

I use a painters multi tool to pry loose baseboards. Its wider and thickeer than a putty knife. It also has a hard place on the end of the handle where its meant to be tapped with a hammer. I find it pretty handy.


11

You would usually caulk the gap between the baseboard and the wall. This is why I usually don't bother painting the trim before putting it up (unless I'm staining it). Usually I would prime the wall first, then put up the trim, putty/caulk, paint the trim, then finally paint the walls.


11

When copper oxidizes, it first turns dark brown (like a copper penny), and then if left undisturbed into a somewhat moldy-looking green. This is normal. If you notice the pipe starting to deteriorate around areas that have a lot of green, this may indicate a leak in the pipe that is introducing more water into the area, speeding oxidation. Just keep an eye ...


11

Dimensions on your photo would help make a better model, but here is what I might do in this situation. The easy way End the upper trim with a bevel (30-45°) at the edge of the stair, then continue in the lower room as normal. Transition You may want to use a transition piece to pull the pieces together. You could even cut an angle into the top ...


10

We usually tack the baseboard in place with one nail at each side, and then find the studs with a stud sensor, marking on the baseboard as we go. Alternately, I would think that every 12 inches would be sufficient. We also caulk the top of the baseboards with paintable latex caulk (which helps with dusting later), and that helps hold the baseboard to the ...


9

A metal escutcheon ring might be sufficient for your purpose. I would fill the hole with steel wool to stop the mice, then cover with silicone to prevent a draft. The steel wool might be unnecessary, as I don't think mice will gnaw though silicone. However, if the hole is large, the steel wool would make it easier to fill it with silicone without having it ...


9

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more ...


8

It makes it easier for the carpet installer because they don't have the baseboards in the way when they're nailing in the tack strips next to the wall. On the other hand, it makes things a little more difficult to install the baseboard later because the carpet and tack strips are in the way when you're trying to nail the baseboard to the sole plate in the ...


7

Use a fire retardant expanding foam: Be sure to turn off the electricity to the heater first, then simply spray it in the gap, wait for it to expand and dry, then cut it flush with the wall and paint over it.


7

I would use a plastic or metal escutcheon as suggested by others, however I would make sure that the escutcheon did not fit up tightly to the sides of the pipe. That is to say, leave a small gap of about 1/8 of an inch between the inside of the escutcheon and the outside of the pipe. You can use silicon to secure the escutcheon to the floor. The reason for ...


7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


6

Remove the trim by seperating the trim from the wall using a paint scraper. If the trim won't slide up and away from the tile after it is seperated from the wall you will have to use a wood chisel to cut the trim right at the top height of the tile. Once the trim is seperated if there is a piece of trim between the tile floor and the wall that can't be ...


6

I think this is a problem easily solved by Quarter round. Actually I think this is why quarter round was invented. If the existing molding is small enough you could possibly cover it up, but it might look even worse if the original molding is too large because the cover would have to be bigger. If you want to cover the original molding you could get larger ...


6

This is a simple job for caulk. Just get a tube, run a bead, and smooth with your finger. Allow to dry, and paint it the same color as the baseboard. If the space is wide enough, first try to close the gap by nailing the moulding into the closest stud. If the caulk shrinks too much, after it dries you can run another bead on top. Note that spackle would ...


6

The make wood putty in a range of colors to match different types of wood. You can probably find one that's a close match to your baseboards. Take a small amount, fill the nail hole and wipe it smooth with a damp cloth. When it dries, lightly sand it and the surrounding area down, then re-varnish the area.


6

My two cents worth..... We always install the base trim and door trim first. If you have split jam doors with the casings already attached, you must install them first or you will have a real problem fitting the jams to the floor between rooms. As mentioned, sometimes the carpet installers can scratch the finish on the baseboards, however it is usually ...


6

We had an almost identical situation in a former garage that we refinished to be an office. Our contractor suggested this and we liked the result: he installed a piece of wood about an inch out from the concrete, putting insulation between them and keeping the wood a consistent and level height - a little higher than the concrete. I can't remember if it was ...


6

Do you have space to install a floor flange trim plate? These should be available in a variety of sizes, so you should be able to find one designed to fit around your pipe's OD. They are made from different materials and different shapes (plastic versions should be way cheaper than $10). It should look something like this:


6

If by HMA you mean Hot-Melt Adhesive, that stuff is for arts & crafts, not construction. You should be using construction adhesive. LOCTITE®, LIQUID NAILS®, DAP®, and possibly other adhesive manufacturers offer a molding adhesive.


6

There needs to be a 1/4" gap next to all walls to allow the flooring room to expand. This gap should be covered with trim of some sort. The problem with baseboard alone, is that most baseboard is 3/8" thick, leaving only an 1/8" of an inch for the wood to contract without exposing the edge. This also assumes that the flooring is laid with tremendous ...


5

Regardless of the religious factor involved in painting hardwood trim, (lololol) if you must do it, you need to buff sand the wood, 150 or 220 is fine for this step. PRIME the trim with BINs Bullseye, pigmented shellac. After the Bins dries, very lightly sand it again with 220-400 paper or 4/0 steel wool. It will be smooth as glass. The shellac will seal ...


5

I just installed baseboard through my entire house. I caulked the top of the baseboard, as you are thinking. I used a paintable silicone caulk, like DAP Dynaflex. Once it dried, I went back with a detail brush and painted the caulk the color of the baseboard. It's a few extra hours of work, but it looks great. Our painter did a couple rooms, and this is ...


5

Have you thought about maybe just building a bench around the room to encase the concrete ledge? I'm not sure what the intended use of the room is, but a bench might be neat for a play room or entertainment room.


5

Real wood. Poplar trim is what I use for bathrooms or basements. It is hard and holds up to moisture well. If you get the plastic stuff it will look like... plastic. It would have to really be in modern room or business setting to look right. I would suggest getting poplar (pine is cheap and has moisture bulging issues) or some other hard wood. Give it ...


5

The main reason the recess is in the back of all moldings is to "thin" the wood, reducing the amount of continuous rings in the wood that helps control cupping. There is a fringe benefit of that relief in the back of trim, it helps get past some irregularities in the wall. I have had more problems with that relief cut than benefits when it come to base. The ...


5

I don't think that's a very good idea. First of all, the wood is already sealed, so the paint isn't going to adhere very well. Second, you're going to waste a lot of money by purchasing nice grainy oak baseboard, since you're paying for the color and grain that are going to be covered up by paint. You can save a dollar per linear foot or more by going with ...


5

I usually use a pair of end cutting pliers, to pull the nails out the back. The face of the tool is slightly rounded, which allows for a good rocking motion. Just grab the nail gently with the pliers, as close to the work piece as possible. Rocking the tool on it's rounded face generates quite a bit of leverage, allowing you to pull most nails out. Just ...



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