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9

My grandfather was a carpenter and when he retired he moved most of his tools into his basement. This included a drill press, bandsaw, and a very heavy full size table saw. It is definitely doable. Drill presses and bandsaws don't generally create as much dust as sanders and routers. You can probably remove most of the dust they'd create with a well placed ...


7

I have my entire woodworking workshop in my basement. Plenty of people have basement workshops. Just get a portable dust collector like this one: Get good filter bags that filter down to at least 5 microns, smaller is better. And a remote controlled air filtration system like this one to hang from the ceiling. Drill presses make very little dust. ...


3

The users manual for the saw should have all the information you need to get the saw setup. This is important because each model of saw will have different guidelines. If it is new saw such manual should have been in the box with the unit. For a used saw that you purchased at some auction, sale or craig's listing there was not likely a users manual ...


3

Yes it will be unhealthy... if you dont have any ventilation 1- MLA / MLZ external grille 2- Filters (hepa/etc)(not required in your situation) 3- a reliable higher quilaity not el-cheapo air fan 4- sensors (not needed here) 5- heater/cooler (not needed here) 6- Grilles 9 - AVM Backflow preventer (important) 10 - AS shutter 7,8 - Switches (not ...


3

From a "size - only" standpoint two critical dimensions of a bandsaw are the throat capacity and the maximum cutting height. Throat capacity is the size of the opening between the blade and the frame. You need your workpiece to be able to fit through this opening as you push it through the blade. Max cutting height is the maximum amount of blade that ...


2

Are there any major differences in terms of what kind of materials I can cut and how large of pieces I can cut? That's the primary difference of any saw. The bigger the saw, typically the larger the substrate you can cut with it. Other variables that affect the type of substrate you can cut would be if the saw has variable speed options, how easy it ...


1

Depends on the types of cuts you plan on doing. If you are planning on resawing lumber, the more powerful motors in a floor standing bandsaw would be required. If you plan on cutting 3/4 to 1" flat stock, motor strength is much less important than the throat depth, which will determine the maximum width of your workpiece.


1

In a band saw, a larger blade basically gets you two things; a little more momentum, and more teeth. More momentum is good because it means the blade is less likely to bind, and if you do encounter some difficulty it's not as hard on the motor. More teeth means the band lasts longer and makes a better cut because the teeth stay sharper. A bigger band saw ...


1

First of all, I'd make sure you have correctly tensioned the blade. Since it's off in the horizontal plane what you're seeing is called drift. Any band saw blade has a certain amount of drift. Most band saw fences have some sort of adjustment to compensate for drift. 20 degrees seems a bit much for normal drift hence why I think you might not have enough ...



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