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25

Do not wear gloves while using a bandsaw (or any powered saw, drill press, or planer for that matter). The gloves will give you a false sense of security and do very little to protect your hands. In fact, they may end up getting your fingers pulled into the blade if the material catches. Which would you prefer: a cut fingertip, or a mangled hand? The best ...


15

Create a jig to hold the pieces in position for the various cuts. The jig will allow to maintain a safe distance from the blade and if designed well will give you a secure grip on the piece being cut. Also try to design your cuts for mass production. For example cut the gap between the legs and around the heads while all the pieces are still one long piece ...


15

Don't. Use a coping saw with a very low profile or spiral blade. Woodworking small enough pieces to worry about your fingers means it'd be just as easy with a hand saw. Doresoom's edit about routing is most likely how they are factory produced.


13

For cutting meeples, I would not use a band saw. I would use a scroll saw. Unless you have an insanely narrow bandsaw blade you won't be able to navigate the turns. An option is to use a drill press to bore out the armpit and crotch area of the meeples. You could probably use the bandsaw to remove the rest of the waste. If you insist on using the bandsaw, ...


9

My grandfather was a carpenter and when he retired he moved most of his tools into his basement. This included a drill press, bandsaw, and a very heavy full size table saw. It is definitely doable. Drill presses and bandsaws don't generally create as much dust as sanders and routers. You can probably remove most of the dust they'd create with a well placed ...


8

Actually, the way the manufacturer probably makes these is to run them through a moulding die so you get one long meeple, then you cut the meeples off at the thickness you want them. You could emulate the moulding die by make the cuts I labelled above using a table saw with the blade tilted (you can then use a push-stick to push your stock through safely), ...


7

I have my entire woodworking workshop in my basement. Plenty of people have basement workshops. Just get a portable dust collector like this one: Get good filter bags that filter down to at least 5 microns, smaller is better. And a remote controlled air filtration system like this one to hang from the ceiling. Drill presses make very little dust. ...


5

If your fingers are getting too close to a tool, it's time for a jig. If I was going to try to do this with a bandsaw, I'd consider putting the piece I was working in a screw clamp. That would give you a larger object to manipulate, keeping your fingers away from the workpiece... and if you cut into the screw clamp that's not a disaster; they're wood so they ...


5

Do not use a band saw. It will not come out well. You could consider a scroll saw, but I would not use that either if it was me. The proper technique: Draw or print the figure on paper, cut it out Paste paper on a stiff piece of sheet metal Use tin snips to cut out the metal template Use a mill file to smooth the edges of the metal template Cut square ...


4

I think you're on the right track, especially in considering TWO saws, one high-speed saw dedicated to wood and another very different low-speed saw for brass/steel. The wood saw will be fine (but messy) with alumin(i)um. You should know a couple more more points. First, the kerf on nearly all bandsaws (except sawmill types) is pretty much identical ...


3

Hand tools are definitely the way to go. A Dremel type tool or hand router may be used for fine work. If you need to do larger quantities, find a laser or water jet cutter in your neighbourhood.


3

The users manual for the saw should have all the information you need to get the saw setup. This is important because each model of saw will have different guidelines. If it is new saw such manual should have been in the box with the unit. For a used saw that you purchased at some auction, sale or craig's listing there was not likely a users manual ...


3

Yes it will be unhealthy... if you dont have any ventilation 1- MLA / MLZ external grille 2- Filters (hepa/etc)(not required in your situation) 3- a reliable higher quilaity not el-cheapo air fan 4- sensors (not needed here) 5- heater/cooler (not needed here) 6- Grilles 9 - AVM Backflow preventer (important) 10 - AS shutter 7,8 - Switches (not ...


3

From a "size - only" standpoint two critical dimensions of a bandsaw are the throat capacity and the maximum cutting height. Throat capacity is the size of the opening between the blade and the frame. You need your workpiece to be able to fit through this opening as you push it through the blade. Max cutting height is the maximum amount of blade that ...


2

Are there any major differences in terms of what kind of materials I can cut and how large of pieces I can cut? That's the primary difference of any saw. The bigger the saw, typically the larger the substrate you can cut with it. Other variables that affect the type of substrate you can cut would be if the saw has variable speed options, how easy it ...


2

A horizontal saw is really only useful for cutoff work. A large vertical saw is useful for some types of metal work other than just cutting off tube and bar stock. Blade length hardly matters on a large metal-cutting saw, as a blade welder is usually included as part of the saw, and you just buy blade-stock in large coils and weld to suit. Room height and ...


1

From my perspective, I cut lots of metal and cant live without my horizontal bandsaw, I cant tell you what is must-have, but I can tell you the features I like. Auto off switch at the end of the cut (sometimes cutting large sections you dont want to sit at the saw. Clampable vice which firmly holds the metal, and is degree adjustable BUT with quick ...


1

Make sure the cutting table has a 'T'-slot for mounting jigs, guides, and miter gauges. You'll also want adjustable blade guides where you can adjust the height of the guide as close to the work piece as possible to provide blade stability and you can get guides that off load some of the heat from the blade which will extend blade life.


1

There's another option that's a good compromise between the overkill of a powerful band saw and the slowness of hand tools that others have suggested. A band saw is going to be fast and offer you nice straight cuts but come on... Even after safety, consider how many separate cuts you're going to have to make on these little guys. Personally I'd opt for ...


1

Depends on the types of cuts you plan on doing. If you are planning on resawing lumber, the more powerful motors in a floor standing bandsaw would be required. If you plan on cutting 3/4 to 1" flat stock, motor strength is much less important than the throat depth, which will determine the maximum width of your workpiece.


1

I would protect my fingers by keeping them away from the blade. when I use my chop saw, I hold the piece I'm cutting by keeping it long and only cutting off the far end. It might call for sacrificing a little material since the last 4–5 inches is too short to safely cut that way. For example, to cut squares for a checkerboard or chessboard, let's ...


1

For future readers, Aluminum ( and copper, tin etc) can be cut with common carbide-tipped blades without any issues, and it's much easier than an abrasive blade. Clamp the metal, put a bit of wax on the blade, cut slowly. The noise made cutting 2 inch aluminum pipe with a radial arm saw is most impressive - the pipe works as a resonator. If you do use an ...


1

It turns out they make a bandsaw blade for cutting metal - I just used that.


1

At work we cut aluminium with a drop saw. An sometimes our table saw. We have a drop saw set up just for aluminium, with a fine tooth blade. It don't really do any damage to it as long as you cut slow. aluminium is softer then some of the timber we cut. So anyway if your trying to cut neat cuts use drop saw. An shouldn't do damage. If you are worried use ...


1

In a band saw, a larger blade basically gets you two things; a little more momentum, and more teeth. More momentum is good because it means the blade is less likely to bind, and if you do encounter some difficulty it's not as hard on the motor. More teeth means the band lasts longer and makes a better cut because the teeth stay sharper. A bigger band saw ...


1

First of all, I'd make sure you have correctly tensioned the blade. Since it's off in the horizontal plane what you're seeing is called drift. Any band saw blade has a certain amount of drift. Most band saw fences have some sort of adjustment to compensate for drift. 20 degrees seems a bit much for normal drift hence why I think you might not have enough ...



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