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8

Here are some good points against using plywood, the source is talking about tiling a floor but most of the points are valid for walls as well. In my opinion it's better to go the "overkill" route, then have to redo the job in the future because something didn't turn out right. The cost difference between plywood and cement board is negligible, so your not ...


6

For a backsplash, it's fine to tile directly to the drywall without anything behind it. For travertine, you probably want to avoid mastic. Mastic should NEVER be used on any natural stone because it is an adhesive and will discolor the stone (the adhesive has chemicals in it that will leach out over time). Use unmodified thinset. You'll also want to use a ...


6

I haven't used KIRDI-BOARD itself, but I have used similar products. Mostly, the biggest advantages are found in weight and longevity of the material. The synthetic foam will last longer than traditional concrete and produce significantly less dust when cutting and installing. The biggest disadvantage will be the cost. Synthetics (KIRDI-BOARD and similar ...


5

Unless you've got a lot of intricate cuts (tough with concrete board) or expect to have a LOT of water on your backsplash on a regular basis, it's probably just simpler to go with backerboard. I have used a Kerdi-board competitor, Wedi, for a shower and found it very easy to work with. Easy to cut and seal. Comes with sealant (caulk tubes) and fastening ...


4

There are insulating gaskets for switches and outlets like these They would help seal against air leaks, but they might not visually fill the gaps at the edge of a switch plate. There are also deep beveled switch plates, such as those found here. You could custom grind these down with a dremel-type tool to fit the highs and lows of the surface, but that ...


4

If your problem is that the thickness of the back splash material has caused the electrical boxes to become recessed you may need to use electrical box extenders. These come in a number of styles depending on the type of electrical boxes you have. There are options for metal or plastic boxes for starters. Other factors would be amount of extension needed and ...


4

There are advantages to doing it either way. If you put the paneling up first, and slid the counter top back so it overlaps the panel a bit, you'll get a very nice looking edge if properly caulked. BUT, doing it this way runs the risk of water running down the back splash, and running behind the counter, creating a rot/mould risk on the cabinetry ...


4

As the rest have said, its purely aesthetic. On this side of the kitchen, we took the backsplash all the way to the underside of the top cabinets to fill in the space. Using different types of tile, we made a pattern that we continued on the opposite wall On this side of the kitchen that doesn't have upper cabinets, we stopped it at the top marble bar. ...


3

I'm sure that there will be a lot of surface damage to the backer. Was it sheetrock of cement board? Regardless, remove as much of the old thinset and grout as possible, even it it gouges into the backer a bit. You can refinish the backer with a first coat of setting type drywall compound, or regular general purpose drywall compound. Try to use the widest ...


3

Seems like most vanities have somewhat of a rounded edge and a backsplash or sidesplash provides a nice clean place to caulk. A vanity seems to be a place where quite a bit of water can wind up on the counter, so I think it's easier to keep clean if you have a splash. What about some ceramic tile? You could put them right on the sheetrock. As for having a ...


3

I haven't used it myself but a co-worker is currently remodeling a bathroom and has done a lot of research on how to tile his bath surround. His impressions of Kerdi-board: it's slightly flexible, so tiles may work loose over time if it's not reinforced properly. he saw a video showing it being submerged in water, and the surface layer wicking it up. ...


2

I just finished installing the backsplash in out kitchen using the mosaic glass tiles like you are describing. I had no problems with putting the tile directly on the drywall using the usual thinset mortar you would use with ceramic tiles. I used a 1/8 in throwel with the little/thin tiles and the whole sheet of tile would attach pretty easy. I think ...


2

Don't bother patching the holes in the drywall. Backsplashes are usually 304 stainless steel. In the US, you could order that from onlinemetals.com. (No, I don't work for them. I recently replaced my range hood and have the same problem as you.) You should get a metal shop to cut the metal with a jump shear. It is very unlikely that you can get a nice edge ...


2

When applying thinset, put it on in a flat coat first,, and lay it on thick, pressing it against the wall or floor. THEN go back at an angle and notch it, removing excess. This makes sure the thinset has good contact with the wall over the whole area and will bond well. Laying it on at an angle, so it's notched in one pass, doesn't spread the thinset over ...


2

While I'm tempted to say the difference is just marketing hype, you can use either one, there is a very slight difference in formulation. The window and door stuff has slightly less petroleum distillates in the formula, according to MSDS information at nih.gov. Petroleum distillates will evaporate during curing, so I'm unsure why there's a difference. The ...


2

The best is to seal your grout. What some do not realize is that the grout needs to be sealed every 3 years. Especially if it is a heavily cleaned area or use.


2

I tile behind the ones I do. First this takes little time. The top couple inches don't have to be perfect. I try to make everything look nice but in the grand scheme of things this is a few minutes of work and you already have the tiles, thinset, grout, and tools going so just do it. Some issues I have come across not tiling: The top row is almost ...


2

I spend a lot of time in France and in the midwest US. Customary in France if you put up a backsplash is to extend it before putting up cabinets. There is no caulking usually between the backsplash and the cabinets. Also the cabinets would be floating on the bottom most of the time. And the bottom cabinets are on legs - where in America they are almost ...


2

Generally finish material runs just short of the edge of the box. There are box extenders to bring the box level with the surface of the finish material. Cut tile edges are almost always a bit rough. To have them as a visible edge is problematic. Plates overlapping tile edges is almost always better.


1

In some European countries, it is customary to install the backsplash first, extending a bit below lower cabinets and above upper cabinet bottom line, and then add the cabine In some European countries (not UK), it is also customary for a tenant to provide their own kitchen units and to take them away when they move out. Maybe the two customs are ...


1

I'd add the tile AFTER so you can anchor your cabinets and backsplash to the wall flush. I live in the US and have never seen it done differently. It's easy, looks good, why not? I suppose you could do it either way, but you'd have to pay more careful attention to the joints where your tile meets the cabinet/backsplash - caulk it, etc. Grease or water ...


1

CAULK IT!!! Work like an artist not a contractor. DON'T "smush caulk everywhere then wonder why it looks like butt when finished. Use ONLY what you need and "tool it in/smooth it out" using a damp finger, wiping frequently. I have been known to mask off the rectangle around the wall plates prior to starting (duct tape works very well on stone). I recommend ...


1

There is a reason that painted surfaces are generally not used for backsplashes, and you have discovered it. The standard approach to both counter and backsplash is to have an impervious surface and a seal between them. This is virtually impossible with paint. Occassionaly you will find heavily sealed wood (clear epoxy, marine varnish, etc.) used for either ...


1

You use as many spacers as needed to get the outlet/switch mounting tabs flush with the tile. You may not need them if the mounting tabs of the box extender suggested by Mr Karas are tall enough to hold extender and device (just need longer screws: 6-32, in either case ) Die cut wallplate insulation gaskets: they go over switch/outlet and under ...


1

An exterior rated product will be good in the kitchen. The version you linked is a "3 hr rain ready" version, so you want to do any tooling ASAP. I like to put 2 tape lines of (blue or other painters edging tape) above and below the joint. Gun the entire line and then "thumb squeegee" the joint. Pull the tape off and immediately touch up with a rag ...


1

With larger tile that may span irregularities, I would advise 1/16 higher to end up flush. With mosaics, I would go for the same height. Too much thinset with mosaics makes a grout line mess, oozing up and needing extra cleaning. If you are using unbacked glass mosaics, be sure to skim coat the whole field with a white thinset before pulling.a notched ...


1

A backsplash is there to be aesthetically pleasing and to provide an easy to clean and durable surface behind food preparation surfaces. It needs to go far up enough to catch the majority of splashes, say a couple of feet up, however past that is all a question of style. Some would say that it should stop at a couple of feet high and extend to the ends of ...


1

Assuming this is ceramic tile - not glass or stone - and you are going to do the standard mastic installation, if there is only mild damage (for example, a few 4-inch patches ripped off) either just ignore it or use joint compound to fill. Joint compound is not strong at all. It is pretty crumbly and soft - i.e. it's not plaster, even though builders ...


1

This close to a water source I'd recommend thinset. You can't go wrong that way. But you could probably get away with mastic if you really prefer it.



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