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10

If you're installing in room where you can't drop above or below the room to run your cables, consider putting up crown molding -- it typically leaves a small channel behind it which is ideal for hiding speaker cables. You can then punch holes in the top of the wall where you need to run vertically, fish the wires through, staple it up into the corner, then ...


6

There is a discussion of stranded vs. solid wire for speaker cable here. The consensus (or at least the weight of opinions) seems to be that there is a theoretical difference, but no practical difference. Speaker wire is also called lamp cord. It is basically parallel stranded wire in either 16 or 18 gauge. The lower number indicates the thicker wire. 16 ...


5

These are called Bullet connectors. They're used as a male/female pair, and allow for quick, repeated connection and disconnection of a circuit. They can be found at any automotive supply store, and some hardware stores. If you won't need to disconnect and reconnect the wires, you can simply cut the connector off, strip the wire, and use whatever other ...


5

Have you thought about using in-ceiling speakers? Then you could fish the wires through the ceiling (assuming the joists run the right way or you have access to the attic).


5

If you can run wiring to the rooms easily, I'd recommend going with the centralized stack-of-amplifiers approach. It's very cheap, easy to set up, probably has the best sound quality, and is the most reliable. IR repeaters Start by placing all the stereo receivers in a centralized location (I picked the laundry room). Then, install an IR receiver ...


2

If they were still hooked up to speakers, there's no voltage concerns, but I'd try to remove them first, check the attic or basement above or below if you haven't already. If you still can't find the origin, I'd try pulling with a little gentle, or not so gentle tugging. If they're there to stay, the safe thing to do is put a wire nut and/or electrical tape ...


2

COAX to 3.5mm Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


2

COAX to RCA adapter You could get a "Y" adapter but it doesn't matter because you are getting mono. The Y would just split the mono in two. For stereo it is doable but the only thing I know is S/PDIF - so search for a COAX to S/PDIF adapter. Either way I wouldn't spend a lot of money on adapters. You are getting mediocre end product no matter what ...


2

Comment converted to answer A 16/14 cap should take between 1 and 4 #16 wires, but it depends on the cap. Specific information should be available on the packaging, or from the manufacturer.


1

Coat hanger is about 10 gauge wire, so it has a lot more surface area than does 18 gauge solid copper. Signal travels on the outside of the wire so braided at a given gauge will give you a better signal. 18 gauge is pretty marginal as is, so I'd not be at all surprised if your ears could tell which speaker was wired w which type of wire. Obviously you're not ...


1

This could be a bunch of problems, from a missing ground to a voltage spike, to dying speakers, etc... First of all, it would be helpful to rule in/out the computer as the source of the popping. It's possible your computer's sound card is not great and is sending those noises to the speaker, which is faithfully playing them. Try plugging the speakers into a ...


1

There are a million options out there. The main thing that you need in this setup is finding a receiver that has really good output control - in that you can pick exactly which outputs you want the sound to go to and be able to save those settings... So if you want to go to all rooms you would have an all-room criteria saved, and so on. You need the ...


1

Yes, that would be fine. What you see is one side of a push-type connector that allows the wires to be disconnected and reconnected.


1

There is an option that may work for you that you didn't list. If you're not using your home's phone lines, you can disconnect them from the utility and use them to carry the signal from a player (computer, mp3 player, etc) to each stereo. Then you can use apps like "Retune" or "Remote" to control the audio from your computer. I've done it in my house and ...


1

I would recommend neither in this case. I would use a small masonry bit and drill several holes outlining around the edges of where the new box will be and then simply use a screwdriver and tap between each hole to make a larger space. The same method works for making a large hole in a concrete block. Should be cheaper than buying or renting some tool too.


1

Tile setters use carbide tipped nibblers to trim tiles by small amounts. You would need to have access to the back of the edge you want to trim off so you can grab it with the trimmers. You take small bites, clip clip clip, until you have removed what you need to. There is still the possibility of cracking the tile, but this is your best bet for trimming ...


1

What would probably work best for cutting tile that has already been placed would be a quality oscillating tool with a diamond blade. Diamond Blade http://www.lowes.com/pd_349423-353-OSC312DG_0__?productId=3380378 You probably wouldn't want to use a carbide blade for tile or grout as it will get chewed up and damaged very quickly. NOTE: Unless you are ...



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