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Definitely keep the garage attic fan (and install one in the house if appropriate). The one change I would make is to upgrade the fan (or convert it) to run on solar power. It's only needed on hot days anyway, which often have more than enough sun to run the fan. A nice simple first solar project!


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The fan is meant to remove excessively hot air to make the air conditioning less expensive. The exhausted attic air should be replaced by air from outside, not from inside the house. The garage ceiling should be (mostly) sealed to prevent air movement between the attic and garage. Unless it is a structure built before about 1960. Also, the attic fan ...


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Negative pressure in your garage is far more likely to be relieved through flimsy overhead door seals than from inside the adjacent home (presumably through the service door weather seals alone). However, it's probably not doing you much economic good to have a fan running in the garage attic. What little energy you save conditioning your home (with its ...


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It's the opposite, in fact: in terms of thermal performance, cellulose is better on the top layer. The reason for this is that compared to fiberglass, cellulose is more dense and more opaque to infrared radiation than fiberglass is. Most attic heat gain is caused by infrared radiation, and convection through the insulation plays a strong role in heat loss. ...


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i am not sure entirely what your post is asking, but if you are looking for a reccomendation, choose mineral wool fibre (like roxul) first, fiberglass second, and cellulose last. mineral wool doesnt hold water, get eaten by bugs, burn or lose its loft fiberglass holds water, doesnt get eaten by bugs, doesnt burn, and loses its loft fairly slowly ...


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5/8" drywall on 24-inch centers is standard practice across the industry. Unless you have some weird early-version panels with poor sag resistance, 15" of cellulose will not cause a problem. I'm with Daniel Griscom, however. R-49 is in the ballpark of what we install in new homes here in frigid Minnesota (regularly seeing -30F in the winter). It's almost ...


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The gable vents are short-circuiting the ventilation. The holes appear to be adequate, but as there's a shorter path of less resistance from in the gable vents and out the ridge vents, the holes don't draw very much air. I'd temporarily cover the gable vents from the inside and see how things change. Maybe take temperature and humidity readings at ...


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This answer has some of the applicable codes for protecting NM cable in an attic. Since there's no stairs or permanent ladder, and the cable is more than 6' from the entrance of the attic. Protection is not required in this situation. If the inspector tries to call you out on not securing the cable within 12" of the switch box, simply have them read ...


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They are apparently considering the attic accessible although it is not readily accessible. Most furnaces in basements have NM cable protected with EMT conduit and that is probably where they are equating that situation to this one. However, in a normal basement the cable would be readily accessible, meaning you can walk right up to it without any tools or ...


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International Mechanical Code dies not allow this. It must be direct vented, typically through the soffit with a terminating cap.


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I wouldn't exhaust the bathroom through the gable vent. First off, you'll be reducing the size of the gable vent. Whatever area you block with the exhaust duct, is a reduction in the area of the gable vent. Secondly. Depending on how the attic ventilation is designed, the hot moist air exhausted from the duct, could be drawn back into the attic through ...


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I wouldn't hesitate to attach the hose to your gable vent, assuming that it's made of a material that won't be affected by moisture. Secure the duct in such a way that the airflow isn't directed at lumber. Drawbacks include lack of a secondary backdraft flap, visibility from the exterior, and lint accumulation.



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