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If I understand your question correctly, you are running a pipe from the in-wall mixing valve into the attic space to supply a rain shower head. This means that the water in this pipe will never be under pressure. Make the pipe accessible and protected, insulate around it. This should be more than sufficient.


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Not sure if this is the right answer, but this is what I did: removed a piece of drywall from the ceiling and cleaned all the insulation that fell down built a small plywood box in the attic above the ceiling (only covering the top and sides, with access from below); insulated the seams with silicone ran the pipe through the plywood box re-drywalled the ...


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I keep seeing your question has not been answered. I do not build in the type of climate you describe but here are my thoughts: Do not trap moisture within the wall/ceiling structure- so one side only. Keep moisture from entering - barrier on room side of wall only. Around here I have had inspectors insist on removing moisture board on ceilings - they have ...


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Fiberglass is probably not that good for you just like many other things you breath in on a daily basis. I would recommend that next time you wear a dust mask and goggles. The good news is that it does not cause cancer. It does case skin, eye and lung irritation. I have had long term exposure to fiberglass over the past 35 years and so far I have not noticed ...


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Adding a little more detail above the other answers, plus recommendations. Fiberglass is made of fibers of glass (duh!). When you inhale them into your lungs, they are not easily broken down by your body if at all. If you don't like the idea of getting wood or metal particles in your lungs, then you shouldn't inhale glass fibers either. For small ...


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Fiberglass can be bad for the lungs: http://www.lung.org/healthy-air/home/resources/fiberglass.html However, for it to be a real issue, one needs a lot of exposure...typically someone that works with it daily as part of their job. The amount of contact a typical homeowner would be exposed to in their lifetime is not likely something to lose too much sleep ...


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Many variables here but for most people this would not be a problem. I have been working on old homes for 30 years and have popped up into attics without proper gear countless times. Sometimes there is some residual irritation to lungs for a day or so and skin irritation form contact with fiberglass. That said - Wear a mask, a good mask, not just a cheap ...


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Fiberglass can cause mild irritation but is not dangerous. You'll be fine.


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I would wait a day or two, and then see a doctor if it doesn't go away. I once had to army crawl through insulation to run some cabling in my house. Took me about an hour as well, and I didn't wear a mask either. The coughing took a few hours to go away, but I am fine :) Insulation is nasty stuff though - I would highly recommend a gas mask and long ...


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yes - these are elements of the truss system which holds up your roof. Usually, any 2x4 you find in an attic is safe to step on - except for small pieces uses to mount vent pipes.


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where is the home? he most important question: Does it freeze in your attic? Even if it freezes - if the pipe is beneath ample insulation it is ok - Unless you are on an extended vacation - in which case must leave the heat on low enough to make sure the house envelope does not drop below freezing.


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You have 2x6 joists 16" o.c. and lets assume #2 fir- the MAXIMUM spam (where they are supported underneath - bearing the weight) for a 20 lb dead load is 9'10" and for 10 lb dead load: 13' 2" You show 11' +- in photo but it is unclear if there is support at that point. you can check span table at: http://www.awc.org/Publications/update/WFCM2001FullPage.pdf ...


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Do not rule out any roof leaks that may be letting moisture into the attic. Check around where you see the mold to make sure there are no areas where rain can get under the shingles or around flashings. It is mostly due to poor attic ventilation where the is a temperature difference between the attic and outdoors. Good attic insulation will help keep your ...


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What is your heating method? Most are somewhat adjustable, though this may not be obvious if you don't know what to look for (i.e. baseboard hot water generally has a flap that can be open, partially closed, or fully closed on the top section of the baseboard, which affects heat delivery.) If you turn up the heat delivery in the room that is colder, and/or ...


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Condensation. Put in a more effective exhaust/ventilation fan. Or just remove the vapor barrier and let your poor bathroom breathe.


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Just the fact that you mention a vapor barrier in your attic is the problem. Attics should never have vapor barriers. Only walls. Next time your at your local home improvement store look at the insulation. You'll see insulation for attics is unfaced and wall insulation has a kraft face, though you can install an unfaced wall insulation if planning on adding ...


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There are covers you can purchase, or easily make, to insulate your attic fan. The cover attaches to the bottom of the fan (inside your house) with magnets or velcro. The magnets are cosmetically more appealing, as you'll see the velcro when the insulation is not on. It's very convenient, because you don't have to climb up into your attic to remove it ...


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Sealing the seams will not increase the R-value of the insulation. However, sealing the seams is important as an air infiltration/moisture seal, preventing air from infiltrating and, as a result, preventing moisture (condensation) from occurring between the foam board and batt. Typically expanding foam creates a better, longer-lasting seal than tape.



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