New answers tagged

1

Since the wood is apt to move a little, I suggest you use "tear away bead", and maybe apply some painter's caulk after a season if you see any gaps. The alternative would be flat taping, but that depends on a pretty close fit between the drywall and the timber.


0

Since it's difficult to vent the lower portion of a hip roof, they usually aren't. Ridge vents typically aren't intended to be used on hips (though some are now available that meet the unique weather-protection needs of sloped ridges). You can simply remove the baffles in that area and fill your space with insulation. Some might suggest leaving an air gap, ...


3

For whomever does this again: I've found it easier to fish monofilament pull line: Tie a large loop it in, tape it to your fishing pole, and retreive it the attic with stick with a hook on it (breaking the tape). Now tie your wire to the other end of the fishing line and pull.


2

What I ended up doing was ditching the fishing rod all together and taping a long piece of magnet to the end of the wire I was running with electrical tape. And on the other side, using a 6 foot long stick and taping about 3 magnets together with electrical tape at the end and I was able to attach the 2 magnets together. This allowed me to draw the wire ...


3

If you were to attach something similar to the end of the wire such as a hex nut that would not easily slip off then you could make up a remote noose on the end of a long stick that looks like this. (proverbial back of envelope sketch) Aim the stick down into the tight corner of the attic and lower the noose over the end of the wire with the hex nut. ...


0

If you aren't worried about touching the insulation, and just want to make sure it stays in place, nylon cord or twine stapled across each bay in a zig-zag pattern will be one of your easiest approaches. I've got this in a few places in my house. Covering the whole wall in any kind of sheeting or additional insulation can cause moisture problems. You never ...


1

Plastic isn't recommended in this situation because it would create a second vapor barrier that can trap moisture and result in condensation and mold. Craft paper would have the same problem, this is what is most likely on the other side of the insulation for the vapor barrier you want. The good solution for this is a house wrap material (often referred to ...


1

As cheesy as the tape looks, it will do ok, It is made to resist the temperatures that blow through the duct work. At worst it may fatigue over time, but I think it will remain intact. To be certain, later when it is running check it out up in the attic. If the plastic shroud that has the tape on it is jiggling, the tape may fatigue. Aluminum can't take a ...


3

Rigid foam insulation will be the easiest to install, since you can simply screw it on. The blue or pink stuff should be fine, and they are easier to handle than Poly-Iso (yellow with a foil backing). You should pick up a pack of insulation washers, often sold for duct insulation, at your home center or on amazon. These are essentially large domed plastic ...


0

Now that you're resolved the problem (the misplaced bath fan exhaust), it'll dry up on its own. Any airflow you can provide helps, as would a dehumidifier or a moisture-absorption product such as DampRid.


0

As ArchonOSX mentioned, you can spray bleach solution on the mold. After they are killed off, use lemon salt + water solution to prevent future mold problems. Remember, after applying lemon salt solution to the surface, you will not be able to paint the surface (if you need). The better solution to prevent mold growth while saving energy is to use rock wool ...


0

If you can get to it, try spaying it down with a diluted bleach solution. Then see if the dry winter weather kills it off. You may have already removed its source of moisture and depending on how much there is it may die off on its own. You should check it periodically to make sure it doesn't get any bigger. Happy Sunday!



Top 50 recent answers are included