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That would depend on how good the foundation is. Normally, the foundation is adequately overbuilt that it's not a concern. The weak link in this sort of conversion is USUALLY the "attic" floor above the garage wich is typically marginal even for light storage, and far from occupancy loads, over a very long span. Bringing that up to an adequate structure is a ...


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My old physics teacher would give you an 'A' for simply creating this question. It is important to remember that whatever solution you choose must fix the problem, and not just move the problem to a different place - AKA: the Wack-A-Mole paradox. I think the first step is to get an infrared thermometer,I chose this one,but pick your own vendor and price ...


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What he's suggesting would be to make the attic inside the building envelope, therefore you'd be heating and cooling the attic along with the house. You either need insulation at the attic floor or attic ceiling. One or the other is the building envelope. If you google some of the terms you can learn a lot. If the house is a standard, single open roof I'd ...


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You don't have to have a ladder for a second story window. However I would buy one and keep it in a well known place. They are literally $30 for a drop ladder. I won't recommend any because I have never had to use one and don't want to recommend anything that is poor. First any municipality will make you have formal stairs getting to the second level. ...


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You will have to have two forms of egress. Your stairs likely counts as one, as long as it's appropriately sized. A properly sized window in each room could be your second. Depending on your location, there may be requirements for ladders from any egress x ft. above final grade.


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It may depend on your use of the term second story, which means different things in different parts of the world. If you have a ground floor (ground level access) a first floor (no ground level access) and a second floor it is normal and customary to provide two means of egress (dual staircases, a staircase and an external fire escape, etc.) from bedrooms ...


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I am in the same situation adding some recess lighting, i chose to hold off the installation of the junction box and get some wood to raise it. Reasoning, was not sure about code, it's easy to do and will be better for me or anyone who may want to add on later to the box. Some wood a nail gun or some plates and some screws and your ready to go.


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I would install a counterweight so that most of the door's weight is removed from laying on the ceiling trim or whatever stops it. Maybe all but ten pounds (4 kg) so the door stays closed tightly. A rope, pulley, and some weight should be all that's needed.


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You could use cable stackers I think:


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Heat will not set off a smoke detector. Heat will set off a heat detector, but most heat detectors would not be set off by the temperatures in an attic (and if one is, if probably means the attic could stand some ventilation upgrades.) A heat detector is commonly employed in areas where some minor smoke might be expected but fire is still a concern (such as ...


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Air sealing is more important than vapor sealing. All assemblies (wall and ceiling) need to be able to dry out. If you prevent air passage AND provide sufficient insulation to prevent condensation, you don't need or want an impervious layer. Cables,plumbing vents, ducts and lighting fixtures are notorious sources for air leaks. These can be stopped ...


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Most of the time in a house in Canada you would have 6-10mil plastic over the drywall in the ceiling. However the answer isn't that easy and the vapor barrier isn't needed for sure. It also depends on the type of insulation that you have (faced or not), what other types of barriers are installed in your attic, and really what is on the rest of your ...



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