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3

The bottom line is that the framing in the corners of your house really isn't meant for a dynamic (e.g. bouncing and jerking) lateral load like what you're talking about. It isn't even meant for a static lateral load. It's meant to hold stuff up, vertically. Once it starts leaning, the game's up. If you're really dedicated to doing this, I would look into ...


0

I build decks for a living. Setting your post in concrete as you would a fence post will work just fine, as long as you use Sono tubes or The Post Collar. You want no earth to wood contact! Or use pier blocks. In the pic you have a ledger securing the deck to the house. You can use 6" pier blocks. Place a shovel full of concrete, even fence post mix under ...


1

You need the concrete to be strong at the bottom and next to the post, otherwise it just needs to be heavy. So put some concrete in the bottom, the rocks round the sides and fill the center up with concrete. You can even brace the post with a few bricks on two sides of the post least most of the post clear, then fill round with concrete. The ...


1

People have bound stone in concrete since...well, since they started using concrete. I don't think adding rock is a bad idea in principle but it matters what sort of rock you are adding. Adding round igneous rock isn't as good as adding broken igneous rock but both are better than adding sedimentary or aggregate rock. I'd support using a metal or plastic ...


7

With regard to using wood posts in concrete: Note that any water that drains down the side of the wood post will drain through to the subsoil. The post should be in a collar, not a cup... (Feel free to integrate into the answer of @sch )


3

It is pier size that matters. My God, yes to the above answers if you were building a very serious structure. Yes less Portland the less PSI. 6 sack Portland cement is about 4000 psi. You can drive a 10,000 pond bull dozer on it all day. % sack which you can buy at Home Depot is about 3000-3500 psi. It is pier size. Dig a 12" x 2' and add some of your rocks, ...


5

It is not good practice to bury wood in concrete as you depict. Best to use metal anchored in the concrete and attach the wood to the metal. Your result will be inevitable rot and failure, probably not before the kids outgrow it but maybe. Something like this ...


4

Reducing the amount of Portland Cement in the concrete will reduce its strength. That is, adding rocks to an already-blended mixture of concrete will reduce its strength over the same mix without the rocks. If this weren't true, they would just add rock to the original mix, since rocks are way cheaper than Portland Cement. The other issue, as John ...


13

Concrete is a mix of large aggregate, small aggregate, and cement (a 4:2:1 ratio is a good approximation - though designed mixes will be more calculated than that). The size of the large aggregate isn't particularly important, unless you are working in very tight spaces or around reinforcement, in which case you want suitably small aggregate. In this case ...


3

Microballoons. Tiny glass or phenolic bubbles. They are the standard product for mixing into epoxy when you need a paste. Should be available at any place that caters to boat repair. Plugging the hole with masking tape or similar may also work perfectly well in this case. If you can arrange to hold the bolt in with pressure, you could also use a large ...



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