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21

No, it's not ok. For one thing, by the time the city inspector looks at the fully framed building, it will be a little too late to fix it. Secondly, the builder's attitude seems very questionable. Either his framing crew or the concrete sub messed up. At the very least their job is not done in a workmanlike manner. They shouldn't wait and hope things 'slip' ...


16

Ideally this should be screwed/anchored into a joist for maximum support. However, if you really want to use a drywall anchor, you should use a toggle bolt or a ceiling anchor. Instead of just screwing into the wall, these expand to several times their size which gives you a good hold, especially when the force is pulling directly down. 10lbs might be ...


14

Concrete is a mix of large aggregate, small aggregate, and cement (a 4:2:1 ratio is a good approximation - though designed mixes will be more calculated than that). The size of the large aggregate isn't particularly important, unless you are working in very tight spaces or around reinforcement, in which case you want suitably small aggregate. In this case ...


13

This is a tall unit and if it were fully loaded, it could really hurt someone (especially a child) should it fall. Products like the 3M command strips are designed for hooks where the force on them is acting downwards. Your cabinet on the other hand, should it tip, would be pulling away from the wall and I really don't think those strips would hold. If it ...


13

I almost always use the self-drilling stud solver type anchors. I find that they are tough enough to hang just about anything. Aside from those, the only other anchors I've found that I like are the toggle-bolt type, which are more useful if you need to hang something from the ceiling.


10

OK this is easy. The answer is NO. The construction has issues: There are no bolts for the sill plates. 2.The sill plates should be spaced on the slab so that wall plus exterior finish meets slab. It looks like this house is getting brick or thick stone given the 3 inches or so from the edge. I am not sure about your situation. You are having a ...


9

No, this isn't normal. Your anchors don't fit to your screws. What is happening is that the tip of the screw reached the concrete, and, of course, you can't force a screw into concrete - not even with a drill or a electric screwdriver, and certainly not by hand. This picture shows how anchor and screw should fit into the hole. The hole definitely needs ...


8

With regard to using wood posts in concrete: Note that any water that drains down the side of the wood post will drain through to the subsoil. The post should be in a collar, not a cup... (Feel free to integrate into the answer of @sch )


7

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


6

A screw directly in plaster or drywall is not very strong. Over time it will work its way out and leave a hole in the wall. It's OK to use a nail to hang a framed painting or photograph. If you do this, first put a piece of scotch tape on the wall, to resist cracking. Make sure the nail is angled 45 deg from vertical. You can pull the nail out when you're ...


5

I usually just poke them into the wall (unless they are the screw in kind obviously, or the kind with a large collar). Put a screw driver on them and give it a sharp whack, then patch the hole. I find it's easier and faster to patch the slightly larger hole, than it is to try and dig them out and then patch the hole anyway. For the larger collar ones, try ...


5

This article has a beautiful summary of the different types of anchors.


5

You could try some "No Nails" or equivalent, though as you say it shouldn't be necessary. The size of screw you are using will determine the size of the anchor you use. This in turn will determine the size of hole you drill. The anchor should fit snugly into the hole and even require a light tap with a small hammer to ensure it fits flush with the surface. ...


5

My vote is for option 3. I've never seen angled pipe flanges either, but you could make a couple for this purpose out of 1-ft lengths of pressure-treated 2x6 with a pipe-sized 45-degree hole drilled in each. Then anchor those to the walls vertically. That would give you the added advantage of spreading your anchors out a bit in the cinderblock, rather ...


5

It is not good practice to bury wood in concrete as you depict. Best to use metal anchored in the concrete and attach the wood to the metal. Your result will be inevitable rot and failure, probably not before the kids outgrow it but maybe. Something like this ...


4

Suitablilty of fasteners for supporting bracketry in concrete depends mostly on the weight. light duty 0-10lbs: Screws with concrete threads, no anchors needed (EG Tapcon and Spax) medium duty: 10-50lbs: anchors of plastic or lead, heavy duty: 50+ : sleeve and wedge anchors There are overlaps between light and medium duty , based on screw size and ...


4

If this is a wall to wall carpet then the back edge of the cabinet most likely sitting on the tacking strip that is placed around the edge of the room under the carpet. Making the cabinet lean forward slightly. You could try placing one or 2 shims under the front edges of the cabinet to level cabinet or even raise the front a bit so it tends to lean back ...


4

Do you have attic access above the spot on the ceiling? I would try to toenail a cross piece perpendicular to the ceiling joists where you want to hang your plant. If there isn't room to swing a hammer between the joists and rafters that close to the edge of the roof, you could just screw into the end of the cross piece through the joists with 3" wood ...


4

Epoxy is required in home building. Especially when attaching a wooden stud to an adjacent concrete wall. Architects and Engineers will usually specify a rod depth and that they are set with epoxy into the wall. The epoxy can be rolled onto the rod extensively and then placed into the hole. You usually allow the rod to set with the epoxy for 24 hours before ...


4

If you are wary of making the holes larger (which is possible and as Tester101 says just make the hole in the tile larger) then you could just go for a smaller anchor and screw. Obviously this will depend on whether the smaller screws are still a good fit for the holes in the hook. Also the load the hook can take might be reduced, but as you're not going to ...


4

There are plastic anchors. My suggestion, avoid them like the plague. I much prefer the self-drilling that Eric posted, easier to install and much stronger hold in my experience. With these, you have to pre-drill the hole, get it too small and it doesn't fit and you have to drill again, or it gets stuck partially and you have to rip it out or try to mash ...


4

I'd recommend using the correct anchors. While you don't plan on putting anything heavy on the organiser, one day you'll forget and then the whole thing will come crashing down. It will also help if you slip and hang onto the organiser to stop yourself falling.


4

Key racks tend to be fairly light, so you shouldn't have any problems using only drywall anchors.


4

Assuming that you have masonry walls, you need masonry drill bits and masonry anchors, which are somewhat different than the molly anchors you find for use with hanging on plaster. Any masonry anchor style should do - as long as you size it appropriately for the item to be hung.


4

Reline your jamb with another material that you can screw into. The pressure you will subject the door frame to is really needing something screwed into it. To just use pressure has the strong possibility of deforming or worse, cracking your jamb, depends on where the shims are placed behind the jamb, but you cant see them, unless you take it apart, not a ...


4

You'll need a masonry bit and hammer drill to get a hole in brick. However it may be easier to screw the hooks to a piece of wood and mount the wood to the wall. With a nice routed edge on the wood that can look really nice. To mount the wood you can use normal masonry anchors.


4

Use larger anchors/screws. IMO this is the best option. There are dozens of different types of anchors, so it is possible to find one that will be larger but fit the smaller screw. Myself, I'd drill the rack and use the proper screw for the anchors you have. Another possibility, since brick is pretty deep, is to use a longer Tap-Con style screw, like 3" ...


4

Reducing the amount of Portland Cement in the concrete will reduce its strength. That is, adding rocks to an already-blended mixture of concrete will reduce its strength over the same mix without the rocks. If this weren't true, they would just add rock to the original mix, since rocks are way cheaper than Portland Cement. The other issue, as John ...


3

I will just take a pair of needle nose pliers, jam it into the wall so one needle goes directly into the drywall and the other goes into the hole of the wall plug. Clamp hard and yank it out. Clean up the hole and patch it.


3

Expansion anchors may split concrete if used too close to the edge.



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