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21

No, it's not ok. For one thing, by the time the city inspector looks at the fully framed building, it will be a little too late to fix it. Secondly, the builder's attitude seems very questionable. Either his framing crew or the concrete sub messed up. At the very least their job is not done in a workmanlike manner. They shouldn't wait and hope things 'slip' ...


14

Ideally this should be screwed/anchored into a joist for maximum support. However, if you really want to use a drywall anchor, you should use a toggle bolt or a ceiling anchor. Instead of just screwing into the wall, these expand to several times their size which gives you a good hold, especially when the force is pulling directly down. 10lbs might be ...


12

This is a tall unit and if it were fully loaded, it could really hurt someone (especially a child) should it fall. Products like the 3M command strips are designed for hooks where the force on them is acting downwards. Your cabinet on the other hand, should it tip, would be pulling away from the wall and I really don't think those strips would hold. If it ...


10

OK this is easy. The answer is NO. The construction has issues: There are no bolts for the sill plates. 2.The sill plates should be spaced on the slab so that wall plus exterior finish meets slab. It looks like this house is getting brick or thick stone given the 3 inches or so from the edge. I am not sure about your situation. You are having a ...


9

No, this isn't normal. Your anchors don't fit to your screws. What is happening is that the tip of the screw reached the concrete, and, of course, you can't force a screw into concrete - not even with a drill or a electric screwdriver, and certainly not by hand. This picture shows how anchor and screw should fit into the hole. The hole definitely needs ...


6

A screw directly in plaster or drywall is not very strong. Over time it will work its way out and leave a hole in the wall. It's OK to use a nail to hang a framed painting or photograph. If you do this, first put a piece of scotch tape on the wall, to resist cracking. Make sure the nail is angled 45 deg from vertical. You can pull the nail out when you're ...


5

I usually just poke them into the wall (unless they are the screw in kind obviously, or the kind with a large collar). Put a screw driver on them and give it a sharp whack, then patch the hole. I find it's easier and faster to patch the slightly larger hole, than it is to try and dig them out and then patch the hole anyway. For the larger collar ones, try ...


5

You could try some "No Nails" or equivalent, though as you say it shouldn't be necessary. The size of screw you are using will determine the size of the anchor you use. This in turn will determine the size of hole you drill. The anchor should fit snugly into the hole and even require a light tap with a small hammer to ensure it fits flush with the surface. ...


5

My vote is for option 3. I've never seen angled pipe flanges either, but you could make a couple for this purpose out of 1-ft lengths of pressure-treated 2x6 with a pipe-sized 45-degree hole drilled in each. Then anchor those to the walls vertically. That would give you the added advantage of spreading your anchors out a bit in the cinderblock, rather ...


4

Do you have attic access above the spot on the ceiling? I would try to toenail a cross piece perpendicular to the ceiling joists where you want to hang your plant. If there isn't room to swing a hammer between the joists and rafters that close to the edge of the roof, you could just screw into the end of the cross piece through the joists with 3" wood ...


4

Suitablilty of fasteners for supporting bracketry in concrete depends mostly on the weight. light duty 0-10lbs: Screws with concrete threads, no anchors needed (EG Tapcon and Spax) medium duty: 10-50lbs: anchors of plastic or lead, heavy duty: 50+ : sleeve and wedge anchors There are overlaps between light and medium duty , based on screw size and ...


4

If this is a wall to wall carpet then the back edge of the cabinet most likely sitting on the tacking strip that is placed around the edge of the room under the carpet. Making the cabinet lean forward slightly. You could try placing one or 2 shims under the front edges of the cabinet to level cabinet or even raise the front a bit so it tends to lean back ...


4

Epoxy is required in home building. Especially when attaching a wooden stud to an adjacent concrete wall. Architects and Engineers will usually specify a rod depth and that they are set with epoxy into the wall. The epoxy can be rolled onto the rod extensively and then placed into the hole. You usually allow the rod to set with the epoxy for 24 hours before ...


4

If you are wary of making the holes larger (which is possible and as Tester101 says just make the hole in the tile larger) then you could just go for a smaller anchor and screw. Obviously this will depend on whether the smaller screws are still a good fit for the holes in the hook. Also the load the hook can take might be reduced, but as you're not going to ...


4

Reline your jamb with another material that you can screw into. The pressure you will subject the door frame to is really needing something screwed into it. To just use pressure has the strong possibility of deforming or worse, cracking your jamb, depends on where the shims are placed behind the jamb, but you cant see them, unless you take it apart, not a ...


3

Tools Hammer Drill The job will be much easier with a hammer drill, or a drill with a hammer option. Though it can be done using a regular drill, given enough time and patience. Masonry Bit You'll also want to put a masonry bit in that hammer drill. A carbide bit is the choice of champions. Method Squeeze, Push, and Wait Put the tip of the bit ...


3

Typically you would remove them, however the anchor you are using is marketed as a "stud solver" meaning that it can be driven into a stud. I think it is fine to leave them. If you were using small plastic drywall anchors then I'd definitely remove them and drive a screw directly into the stud.


2

They make a metal brack to span the old 2X4 and you most likely can get it to work for the new roof. If not I can most likely get some made at work. You do have some good bracing and support on the one footing you have pictured here and if the other one is the same way it would be just as strong. I would just pull out the old footings and replace them ...


2

Well, if you REALLY don't want to damage the wall or cabinet, you could roll the carpet back, pull up the tact strip.. get a new one, then sandwich a tie-down strap between the floor wood and the tact strip. Re-secure, but also Put 2-3 screws through the strip into the strap (depending on the width) You should probably use a washer there. Then, on the back ...


2

Those hangars are designed to go into wood, but you should be able to install into concrete using lag shields, just as you would use with a lag bolt. My only concern is that lag bolts have a standards and ratings, where this ladder hangar might be of unknown strength, and could simply shear off in the lag shield. I wouldn't park my car next to or beneath it. ...


2

No, this is not correct. When the slab was poured, the architect should have specified on the blue prints that 1/2" all thread rods should be placed every so many inches (I don't recall what the US Building Code states at the moment, but I think mine was every 18 or 24 inches when I built my room addition). You are then supposed to take a washer and a nut ...


2

My answer about the construction is that it depends: In New Zealand for instance, you MUST have the bottom plates beyond the edge of the slab (as some of yours are) for weather-tightness reasons. The cladding is often then run down past the level of the slab. The idea is that the framing has a waterproof layer (a.k.a "building wrap") then an air gap to the ...


2

If the screws are ONLY in to drywall, take it down immediately and reinstall the screws with the anchors. Drywall will not hold a screw all by itself. With an anchor, the anchor expands BEHIND the drywall, preventing pull-out. If the screws are very long AND you got them in to the studs, you could be good. But it depends on the type of screws, the weight of ...


2

I glued 1 inch thick rigid foam board onto the concrete floor which I had previously treated with a 1/16 inch coating of xyprex moisture proofing. Then I glued OSB sheets to the foam board. In both cases I used P-400 foam board glue, which worked very well. This subfloor will support a variety of laminate products in future when I want to have a more ...


2

Prescriptive nailing schedules are part and parcel of flooring or wall exteriors. In both above grade situations, the goal is to create a unitized structure. Wall panels properly attached become stressed members that resist lateral racking forces. In the basement, over a poured concrete slab, no structure enhancement is necessary. Therefore any fastening ...


2

Simpson Strong-Tie has an epoxy system for permanently setting structural anchoring systems in cement. It's probably the strongest you will come across. The bolts need to go as deeply into the wall as possible for maximum surface area. One of your problems with this mounting is that steel is quite strong in shear but leverage increases pretty swiftly when ...


2

The anchor you show is a lead anchor that is often used for masonry. However, as you see it failed. Lead is crushed into the walls of the hole by the screw or bolt holding it, but is prone to tearing under heavy load. The walls of the hole may also crumble under heavy pressure. If the holes are truly 3/4, you can use an expansion fastener that is steel, ...


2

If the anchor has been overtightened and is now loose in the wall, it cannot be salvaged. The plaster in the wall (or the drywall) has been pulverized and will not hold this anchor or any other. You need to remove the anchor and the screw. AMENDED ANSWER Based on new information from the Original Poster, the anchor is a molly type that mushrooms behind ...


1

I think you already hit on it. The bulk head at the top would be a good place to secure the book shelf from tipping. Set the book shelf in place and then angle bracket the structure to the ceiling so it won't tip. Find a stud or other structure at the ceiling to make it sound. If the book shelf does not stand as tall as the ceiling, then you have another ...


1

Monkey hooks are great. Modify the hook using wire snippers. It leaves a tiny hole in the wall and they hold up to 50 pounds. Very very solid for heavy things. I trust these much more than screw+anchor - if I can get these to work for the application. They wont work for everything (like blind housing that has to screw in) but for anything to "hang" ...



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