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8

Up/downs that I'm aware of: Aluminum is more corrosion resistant. Steel is more fire resistant without underlayment. Aluminum is (at least a few years ago) more expensive. There are a couple of different galvanizing techniques used with steel. Understand the differences that apply to your weather conditions. Both roof types will likely outlive you. Both ...


8

There are several online metal suppliers that will also make custom cuts. Online Metals is one that I have used. There is a minimum length that you must order (usually 1 ft) and a charge per cut. Depending on where you live you might also find a local metal supplier that can do the same for you. Wherever you order, I'd suggest you get two 5" pieces ...


6

The screw you're showing is a self-tapping metal screw. It's designed to cut it's own channel into metal and grab hold by cutting it's own threads - but it's not meant for repeated uses because repeat uses can damage it's own threads, making its hole too big for it. Take it to the local hardware store and get one that is slightly wider in diameter, and use ...


5

I would say, "yes, but...". First of all, you'll need the appropriate bit. Tungsten carbide is the go-to for most metal drilling, and such bits are usually also designed to drill efficiently into metal and remove the waste. You can probably also find diamond-tipped bits which will also be good at biting into the metal and removing it. Your average drill bit ...


5

One of the really great benefits of metal roofing is its ability to deflect heat which reduces cooling costs. This is because of its high reflective and emissivity (ability to release heat) qualities. Metal roofing is beneficial both in hot and cold weather. Its benefits are well documented.


5

As Karl recommends, drilling dry with a metal drill bit (HSS or Carbide) is the basic information that you need. As far as drilling speed goes, you can refer to a cutting speed chart and do a bit of math. Aluminum's cutting speed is 350-400 fpm or 106,680-121,920 mm/minute. The distance travelled by a point on the outermost edge of the bit during one ...


4

Drill dry. You need a carbide tipped bit that's rated for metal; this will be obvious on the outside of the packaging. I'd drill fast.


4

Depends on the size of the screw and how much material you have to work with. If this is a clamp bolt, cheap tripods use screws going directly into the casting. Quality units either use a captured nut, Nyloc nut and eccentric toggle or a tee-head bolt with threaded knob. If this is a plate with a fair amount of metal surrounding the hole and it's deep ...


4

Aluminum wiring is not the fire hazard people would have you think it is. In fact it is perfectly safe and there has been studies showing that the only increased chance of fire is produced with an improper installation. This usually means that contractors using outlets or devices that are not rated for aluminum. This does cause the wire to eventually ...


3

Aluminum is made of aluminum - processed from rocks. This is actually a great "How It's Made" Episode. There is very little that really changes with most aluminum that you buy other than size and shape. I am sure there are slight differences in strength due to tempering processes and coating but this is usually minimal. If some aluminum is a lot "softer" ...


3

Should be fine, especially for indoor use, where there is little moisture and salt. Zinc and aluminum are pretty close galvanically, so the zinc coating should help. In fact, most bolts used on aluminum-structure airplanes are made of steel plated with zinc or cadmium (source).


3

Not directly answering your question - but as you're replacing shingles with metal you'll need to make sure you insulate the roof well. Otherwise it could get very hot in summer and cold in winter.


3

Aluminum does NOT hold heat, nor does it retain heat, better than steel. The opposite is true. Aluminum is a BETTER conductor of heat, therefore, it heats up much faster than steel, and, when the heat source is removed, cools quick. Since aluminum transfers heat more quickly, it will heat quicker and more evenly than steel, which is why cooks like it. ...


2

Besides the adhesives already mentioned, as you're looking for something that could be removed if necessary, I'd suggest 3M VHB. It's similar to what's in the 3M command hooks (although stronger ... it'll take the paint off walls), but it's not as strong in shear, so it's possible to remove things by twisting when you have to. It's sold in rolls ... you ...


2

I would suggest good old J-B Weld for joining plexiglass and metal, and thistothat agrees. Rough up the mating surfaces with 120 grit sandpaper and be sure to clamp where you can. If you don't want the J-B Weld to show, you'll have to put the plexiglass angle above the aluminum channel. However, it will definitely be harder to get a good bond, you'll have ...


2

Aluminum is more corrosion-resistant than steel. Aluminum is lighter than steel, but softer, so it's less of a load on your house's structure but won't take the punishment of a severe hailstorm as well as steel. Aluminum also "holds heat" better than steel; it will warm quickly in the sun, and won't cool off as fast at night. This (plus its weight) is why ...


2

Aluminum is a soft metal and screws stripping is very common. Since I don't know of any way to make a striped hole smaller, short of welding in new metal then drilling and tapping, the only solution is to make the screw larger. If you have a #6 screw now, use a #8 now. Simply replace the original with the next larger gauge. BTW, that is not giving up, ...


2

I live in Colorado, where it can go from 70F and sunny to 20F and snowing in a day. I have metal-clad wood windows in my house--not a problem. Wood window manufacturers try to use wood that minimizes movement. Aluminum has a larger linear coefficient of thermal expansion than wood (12.3 versus 3.0), so I don't believe aluminum would handle temperature ...


2

This is a tough one, as the aluminum is hard to weld. And replacing the sill plate is tantamount to replacing the door (strike one for planned obsolescence). I'd first try trimming a small scrap of aluminum slightly wider than the hole. Roll the top edge so it takes the weight of the door. Then clean the heck out of the area, and epoxy it into place. ...


2

And for a completely different answer try adding 'repair' to your google search and up pops: http://slidingdoortrackrepair.com/ Where you can find a cap to restore the track: Also available for screens from http://www.slide-ezzz.com/catalog/sliding-screen-door-repair/ But do note that will stuff up your remaining weep holes.


2

That appears to be a concealed overhead door stop. You might have to search around a bit to find the right style and size - if you know the manufacturer of the door you can try there to see if they sell replacement parts.


2

Soundproofing as it relates to windows is all about mass -- the denser the materials, the more sound reduction you'll get. PVC is, indeed, typically more dense than the far more lightweight aluminium and so will will resist noise transfer more. However, the amount of surface area made up by the frame is absolutely dwarfed by the glass itself. Any ...


1

Steel reinforced epoxy might do the trick, if you buff the area well enough first. But I'd go with the metal patch plus epoxy mentioned elsewhere.


1

That looks like powdercoated steel. In that size, you probably will have to get something custom made. You can try to source the raw powdercoated steel yourself online (or locally?) and have a professional shape it for you. If you are lucky you might find some pre-bent 90 degree stock online as well. Here's one possible one-stop shop, but it might be ...


1

When you buy 'aluminum' extrusions or find a tool made of 'aluminum' at the hardware store, you can be virtually certain that it is not pure aluminum but is instead an aluminum alloy. Pure aluminum is not very strong by itself. However, there are a number of different aluminum alloys for different applications, many of which are quite strong. Some of these ...


1

The two options are: Re-Thread the hole with a bigger screw (dont force a bigger screw into a damaged site). Use a Reaming/Tap tool to increase the thread size to your desired size... (also, in order to use the heli-coil) you will need to ream/tap the hole. Helicoil - places an insert into the site to reduce the thread size once again. you will need to ...


1

Nutsert is a thread repair system that restores or installs threads in just about any material and any thickness. The threads are steel so they last through repeated use. They are available at "Fastenal" dealers/stores. There are two types flanged for thin materials and flangeless for thicker materials. The flanged units are similar to a large rivet with ...



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