Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

For the record, I tried it out myself. I installed the Cool-N-Save system on a 4-ton A/C unit that was scheduled to be replaced in three months. After that three month period in the middle of the summer, the positive effects of the system were negligible at best, and probably detrimental. There were no detectible savings in cooling costs nor increase in ...


1

Rather than focussing on how it's done (inverter drive) focus on what it does (variable speed compressor) Essentially, the variable speed allows the compressor speed to match the cooling load, so rather than a fixed speed compressor starting, cooling, stopping, starting, cooling, stopping a variable speed model can simply adjust its speed to match the ...


0

Check your drain lines for water run off. Make sure they are clear and then check the float for the excess water shut down reset them


1

We had the same problem in our house, and we've simply lived with it - having had HVAC companies come out and inspect or evaluate it. They all said the system was in good working order, and was appropriately sized for our house. This year we replaced 3 windows and a doorwall in the first floor of the house, and suddenly we can not only maintain a ...


0

You could try running an insulated duct under the house to the side of the building (with appropriate provisions to keep rain and/or rodents from running into it). That might avoid/reduce having heat come right back up through the floorboards. Remember that you also need to draw outside air INTO the hot side of the heat exchanger. If it draws from inside ...


1

Air conditioning works by moving heat from inside the house, to the outside. If you dump the heat under the house, it will surely find its way back in.


0

To answer my own question, I went ahead and installed a Bonaire Durango 4500 CFM window unit permanently through a wall in my main living area. So far, it has been doing a magnificent job of cooling the entire house, including the bedrooms, and it's even acceptable right now during the monsoon season. When the outside temperature is in the 90s and the ...


1

You are correct the refrigerant is not a consumable. If a system is low on refrigerant, then it has a leak. The technician should have a "sniffer" tool that can detect refrigerant leaks. If they didn't use it last time, then they were irresponsible. Also, refrigerant is expensive so that attitude of "if it gets low again then we know you have a leak" is ...


1

Well, it's certainly not pretty. But going to a floor drain rarely is, unless the drain happens to be positioned remarkably conveniently. An alternative would be to drain into a small container with a pump, whose output could be routed as needed. That's what was done in my house. This does require providing power to the pump, of course, but since I have a ...


1

I think I'd suggest looking for alternatives which don't involve that window well. Perhaps a ducted A/C would let you install the ducts through the wall above the sill (as you would a dryer's output).


2

You would be far better off building a roof type structure over the window well that is well above the window well and projects far enough out around the edges of the well that rain water does not enter the well. Trying to jury rig a scheme to keep an existing lid open "just enough" sounds like a recipe waiting for disaster. Either it will be left closed ...


2

Chlorodifluoromethane, also known as R22 refrigerant has a boiling point of -40°F at 0 psi. As you increase the pressure of the refrigerant, the boiling point also increases. At 68.5 psi, the boiling point of R22 is 40°F. In a normally functioning system, the refrigerant is sent into the evaporator at about 55-65 psi. Which means that the boiling ...


0

Consumer Reports groups single-room A/Cs roughly into small/medium/large categories (100 to 300 square feet, 250 to 400 square feet, 350 to 650 square feet), and from what I've seen the BTU ratings and room sizes on A/C boxes in stores seem to follow the same general formula (probably they're all referencing the Energy Star calculations). Yes, one can ...


0

Same solutions used for dehumidifiers should work: Let it drip into a tube run to somewhere appropriate (a drain, for example), or let it drip into a container that periodically pumps the water to somewhere appropriate. (My basement dehumidifier drains into the same pump that takes care of condensate from my boiler; its output hose is routed into the washing ...


1

OK, if you can't change it, and they own the A/C, and you previously agreed to the current state of affairs but are now annoyed by it, here's another idea: plant an extremely water-thirsty plant that will transpire a large amount of water every day. Then just water it with the condensate. Grass can have a high transpiration rate. Maybe you could have a ...


0

I would also offer as an alternative: a wider and flatter bucket. If you used a wide pan the evaporation rate would increase and might even be to the point of not needing to be emptied.


0

I see from your profile that you have previously asked questions about various configurations of ductless mini-split heat pumps, and that you have (or had) a Daikin model. Is this a unit you bought and installed yourself? If so, it seems that you have already violated the "no modifications" rule and presumably you could do it again to make a modification ...


2

If there really is no possibility of connecting it to a drain with its normal gravity flow, your only non-bucket option is to install a condensate pump, whose job is to raise the liquid up to a height where you can easily dump it in a drain or on the lawn or something. These are very common for basement installations of central air conditioning units where ...



Top 50 recent answers are included