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If you're worried about mineral buildup then buy a water filter. Go to Lowe's or Home Depot and get the 5 year inline water filter cartridge. I've thought about this too and living in the Panhandle of Oklahoma the weather is about the same conditions. We used a swamp cooler back in the day and I thought it worked just fine, so I thought about building a ...


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There is a distinct possibility that another another component of the AC unit has some how gone bad and is overloading or injecting bad signals back into the control board and in turn burning it out. It would take local diagnosis - along with a service schematic of the unit - to be able to isolate the faulty component. But your repeated replacement of the ...


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A lot of good suggestions were given, but in my case it ultimately was two things: Poor insulation - the energy audit found the insulation was about 8 to 10 inches too low for our area. Given the age of the house, it wasn't surprising that this needed to be rectified. Soffit vents - or lack thereof. I had no soffit vents to ventilate the attic properly. ...


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as a HVAC technician. i found most failed capacitor issues was involved with blocked/dirty condensate coils, causing the compressor/fan to drew more amperage. so check first your condensate (outside unit) coil. if it is dirty unscrew the grill/fence around the unit and clean it with water. it is sometimes important to use detergents to wash it off.


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If you look up the user manual / installation instructions for that model it looks like your window might actually be too wide. This model is designed for casement and sliding windows with an opening width between 15 1/2" and 16 1/4", and a height of 21 1/2" to 40" (or up to 62" high with an optional accessory kit). I would not attempt to install the unit in ...


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The specs on the AC unit say it's 14.2" wide, so it will certainly fit in the opening. You don't say how high the window is, but if it's a double hung, two pane, slide-up window like the ones on the building across the way, you might have to remove the window to make this work then fit a glass or plexiglass pane into the space above the air conditioner after ...


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If you swapped out the thermostats with the power on, you could have shorted out the transformer. Best case is a blown fuse, worst case is a blown transformer. Do you have a C wire at the thermostat? If so, test AC voltage (VAC) between R and C. You should get between 24 and 30 volts. The furnace breaker should be in the main panel, or there will be a ...


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This is basically a safety feature. In the case of heating, if the fan turned off immediately after turning off the thermostat, the heat buildup in the heat exchanger could cause it to eventually crack and leak carbon monoxide into your house, so the fan continues to blow until the heat exchanger sufficiently cools. In the case of the A/C, there's no ...


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Power strips, formally called Relocatable Power Taps (RPT), are universally discouraged by fire protection authorities for long term use. Where they are tolerated, daisy chaining them is "bad" as explained here and by IFC 605.4.2 (2009) : Relocatable power taps shall be directly connected to permanently installed receptacles. Even when using an ...


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I'm in Australia so I'm not sure if my answer would be completely applicable in your circumstance. We have 240V here so 10A max... Anyway I'll let you be the judge of whether what I say will be relevant to you or not... Personally I would buy a good quality powerboard (you guys seem to call them a powerstrip) and test it out myself. Here in Australia the ...


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Your AC only draws 6.3amps when its running. But when it turns on, for a moment as the motors start, it draws significantly more. Many window air conditioners say in the manual that they need a dedicated circuit because of this. These startup surges may melt cheap powerbars and splitters, eventually causing enough damage to be a fire hazard. ...


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You may have a breaker integral to the AC that has tripped= a little red button you have to press to reset it.


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As it turns out, the box in the last picture is a safety measure which cuts the electricity when the panel door is removed. Turns out, there were a couple of screws on the outside that secure this box that were missing. Why? I did it (DOH!). I removed them a few days back when trying to open this panel door so that I can do the "G wire to C wire" switch for ...


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The condensate pump should have a float switch in it so that it automatically comes on when there is water in it, and turns off when it's empty. It is also possible to run the pump by pressing the test button (if it has one) or shorting the terminals on the float switch (if exposed) or in numerous other manners. Normally, you would not do this. However, if ...


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Here is a video and pamphlet showing how to do what rifaco suggests, as well as some other things to improve window AC efficiency.


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I normally use something like Blu-Tack to cover up annoying standby lights. It's easily removed and does not leave residue.


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Black electrical tape over the light. Two layers if it is especially bright.


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Short of giving it an electronic lobotomy, there is probably no way to turn the lights off. What I would recommend is to get one of those foil pans or pie plates sold in supermarkets and cut a square out of it the same size as the control panel of the AC unit. Then, use some duct tape on the top edge of the square and attach it to the panel so it acts as ...


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The lack of insulation on the ducts in the floor is of no concern as the floor is in the conditioned space (ie, the area around the ducts is supposed to be cooled.) If the ducts were in the attic that would be a BIG deal. The very low insulation in the attic seems like both a contributing problem, and the most easily solved one. Either rent a blower and buy ...


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One day several years ago it was 118° here, and our A/C couldn't get the house any cooler than 87°. Eventually I discovered there wasn't enough aluminum tape around the return air duct, so I was just blowing a lot of cool air into the attic. Taping it up solved the problem. I don't know if that even applies in your case, but if so, it's worth a look.


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There is some additional easy trouble-shooting you can do yourself. Check temperature at the vents: Get a little thermometer. Put it right on or just inside one of the air vents so that it's getting the full effect of the air temp coming out of the vents. The air should be about 20 degrees cooler than ambient in your house. So, if your house is 75, the air ...


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If you have a set of gauges, you should connect them at the condensing unit and measure the pressures in the refrigerant lines. If you don't have a set of gauges, you should contact somebody who does. Troubleshooting and repairing A/C units requires special tools, without them you can only speculate as to what the problem is. If I had to speculate, I'd ...


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I found the solution by playing with it. On the new thermostat, remove the blue and grey wires, as they are just relays to the temperature sensor. Black goes to C, and link E and AUX. In the thermostat settings, go to option 170 and change it to option 2 for heat-pump settings. This process did the trick for me.


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A picture might be helpful here, but generally speaking, any HVAC installer should be able to create an "adapter" out of sheet metal to fit between the bars and connect to your hose. It's not critical that it maintain the same shape, so you can convert from a round hose to a square vent as long as it supports the same or larger volume of airflow. Just as ...



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