New answers tagged

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If you are not scared of math... "R-Value" on insulation is SqFt•Hr•Degree F / BTU (USA-units) So 1 square foot of R1 material can be held one degree different for one hour by one BTU. One square foot of R11 material can be held at 11 degrees difference for one hour by the same one BTU, or 11 square feet of it could be held at 1 degree difference. My ...


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This is easily achieved with a mini-split unit for each room - that is also usually the most energy-efficent approach. There are split systems with a single outside unit feeding up to 4 separate inside units (perhaps more, but that's the most I've noticed) but they have worse efficiency numbers than the one-head, one outside unit systems. And, of course, a ...


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You calculate it by cubic feet. You also need an idea of how well it's insulated and how much (average) you need to raise the temp. in winter. There are lots of calculators on line where you just plug in your figures, like this one. I would probably check a bunch of on line calculators, check calculators on the websites of heating equipment manufacturers (...


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A thermostat is only useful if it has exclusive control of a source of heat or cooling. For instance, a three floor house often has three heating zones, with one zone and corresponding thermostat for each floor. Adding additional thermostats without each having something to control would be a waste of thermostats. So, what will each thermostat control? Ed ...


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Motor starting loads (its the compressor motor in your A/C drawing all the current) can be very high and it is normal for them to briefly exceed the continuous rating of their circuit including the breaker. If breakers were designed to open with more sensitively, with that kind of load they would nuisance trip all the time.


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If it's not an obvious mechanical failure, it could be (a) a problem with the controls or (b) a refrigerant leak. Symptoms of control problems would be the compressor not turning on or not staying on. You should be able to hear it turn on/off distinct from the fan; if you aren't hearing that, then it may be repairable by replacement of a thermostat or the ...


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Your house is not a space-ship, and it's not built like a space-ship. If it's built anywhere close to a spaceship, you can run continuous ventilation fans, typically though an air-air heat exchanger. If it's of "normal construction" normal leakage will take care of adequate air exchange. If you are adequately curious you can have a "blower door test" done ...


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Conduit may serve to contain heat in the event of extreme overload, but that's not its primary purpose (which is to protect the wires). Not all multi-family dwellings have wiring run in conduit even today. If your wiring overheats it's probably not protected with suitable breakers or fuses. Wiring and associate devices aren't rated for wattage, but voltage ...


3

Air conditioners do not magically lose refrigerant. If refrigerant is missing, the air-conditioner leaks; if the leak is not fixed, it will continue to leak. Fixing the leak is a related service that you absolutely require before you even think of adding refrigerant or having anyone else do so. Since you quite obviously are not equipped to find and fix the ...


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I have never used interior duct insulation, I would think the foam or whatever material could off gass causing the smell you are getting. Metal ducts in my experiance are wrapped on the outside and flex ducting has the insulation outside the plastic. Since you are having smell issues I would say exterior is the way to go.


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Remove the vent cover, attach some rigid duct work, run along the house a few feet, put the vent cover on the end of the run. Make sure the end of the new run is lower than the exit point, so that moisture/condensation will never run inside. BTW, make sure the ductwork inside is rigid. If it isn't replace that too.


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This question is primarily opinion-based, since the answer depends on what makes you most comfortable. As a person never short on opinions, I suggest this: Put the AC in the window at (1) and leave the doors to the master bedroom and the kitchen open. Purchase an inexpensive pedestal fan like this: and place it at (2) blowing in the direction of the ...


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My issue was compressor coil needed cleaning I used Web Condenser Coil Cleaner Turned off AC Sprayed two cans of Web Condenser Coil Cleaner on all the sides Let it sit there for 15 minutes Washed with Water hose let it dry for 30+ minutes Turned off the unit


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It does not seem that the thermostats are compatible, no. Your existing thermostat is designed to control a heat pump with a multispeed air handler: L1/L2 are likely 24VAC in COMP controls the heat pump compressor R.V. controls the heat pump reversing valve HIGH/MED/LOW control fan speeds the unused wire is just that -- it looks like someone wired your '...


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I strongly recommend asking your landlord. They will have dealt with this before, and will know what solutions will work -- and given the potential liability issues they may insist on doing the instillation. (I have dismounted a NYC airconditioner, which had been installed with a moderately complex metal framework apparently designed to solve exactly the ...


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Sure you can buy gauges, leak sniffers, temperature probes, and a bunch of other gizmos. Unfortunately, it doesn't really make any difference. The average homeowner doesn't have the knowledge, skill, tools, experience, or certificates required to repair problems with the refrigerant system. You can determine you have a leak, and even find the exact ...


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Yes you can buy gauges, but do you know what you are doing? Do you have a 608 small appliance licence?(systems under 5 lb most homes have larger ones and require the high pressure license). Next just having gauges will only give you a ball park, a dual temp gauge (at minimum a good single temp gauge) is needed to understand what the pressures really are. If ...


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I'd start by checking the start capacitor for the fan motor. If that's starting to go bad, the motor could be drawing high current for too long while trying to start.


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It's possible to change the motor, but doing so may not change anything. In fact, blindly changing the motor could actually cause the system to perform worse. Without knowing a ton more about the system, it's impossible to diagnose the actual problem. It could very well be poor duct design, an undersized system, or a whole host of other problems. The ...


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When you asked to increase the blower, what you are really asking to do is increase the fan speed (amount of air), right? You could ask the the tech to check/verify that you are getting 1600 CFM (cubic feet per minute) and if you truly are, and if that's not enough, ask them if it is possible to increase it (it might be adjustable). But I am thinking that ...


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Sounds like you have tried the basic items. You could try replacing the breaker. If you continue to have a problem then you will have to call an air conditioning service technician to check the unit out completely. Good luck!


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Sounds suspiciously like your A/C lacks a suitable time-delay relay to prevent rapid on/off cycling, which is generally a bad thing (and why those are usually included.) In short, when you "flipped off" the A/C circuit breaker, you should have waited 3-5 minutes before flipping it on again (or the system should have waited that long before attempting to ...


3

The numbers are completely arbitrary, and are whatever the product manager or artist at the manufacturer decided they should be. They might be standardized within a company's product line. If these are private-label units, all bets are off. Numbers instead of real degrees means they used a thermostat too cheap to be consistent from unit to unit, so they ...



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