New answers tagged

1

The voltage needs to be the same, and the VA needs to be greater or equal to what you have now. If your transformer is 40VA and you replace with 60VA, that is fine. I would stay within parts intended for use in HVAC units. Electronics supply houses will happily sell you 24VAC transformers, but they may not be listed (certified) for HVAC use. Anyway, ...


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Definitely keep the garage attic fan (and install one in the house if appropriate). The one change I would make is to upgrade the fan (or convert it) to run on solar power. It's only needed on hot days anyway, which often have more than enough sun to run the fan. A nice simple first solar project!


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The fan is meant to remove excessively hot air to make the air conditioning less expensive. The exhausted attic air should be replaced by air from outside, not from inside the house. The garage ceiling should be (mostly) sealed to prevent air movement between the attic and garage. Unless it is a structure built before about 1960. Also, the attic fan ...


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Negative pressure in your garage is far more likely to be relieved through flimsy overhead door seals than from inside the adjacent home (presumably through the service door weather seals alone). However, it's probably not doing you much economic good to have a fan running in the garage attic. What little energy you save conditioning your home (with its ...


9

Answer to Question asked originally That appears to be unused piping that goes nowhere now. The valves were shutoffs for whatever was that direction. The pipes appear to be capped now, meaning the valves have no function now. Answer to question as Edited These pipes and valves still have no purpose. Take the picture you posted to your maintenance people ...


1

I understand it may not be practical, given that you don't own the apartment, but the obvious and sensible (and energy-efficient) solution, to me, would be to have proper overhangs on the south-facing windows that prevent solar gain through the windows in the summer (but allow it in the winter, due to lower sun angle). If possible, I would see if the ...


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If your system is anything like mine, that pan is actually the secondary drain. The primary drain goes directly from the unit to the outside. In mine the outside primary is on the bottom of the wall and the secondary, which drains the pan, is on the top. I think they put it on the top so that the homeowner knows it's being used.Rather than guessing, you may ...


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Sounds like the drain line is clogged with mold and mildew. You can have an AC repairman use a 'snake' to clean it out for a small fee (compared to major repair work). It should be done every 2 years at most. Also, check the pipe outside to make sure it is pointed down. Lizards and other tiny critters might get inside and get stuck but not likely. It the ...


3

Before you begin, make sure to pull out/turn off the serviceman switch, and/or turn off the breaker, to remove power to the unit. Once you open the unit, you'll want to discharge the capacitor(s). A charged capacitor can store enough energy to kill you, so you want to make sure you discharge them. Test the motor To check the motor, you're going to want to ...


2

It's hard to tell from the product page, but it looks like this is just an ionizer, with no fan or filter. If so, then all it does is emit ions; it doesn't remove anything. The theory is that it will charge particles (e.g. birch pollen), which will then attach itself to nearby surfaces, thereby cleaning the air. Unfortunately, these are more effective at ...


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YES/NO. I could find two answers: no and yes. The no was marketed by manufacturers of large air purifiers containing full-blown HEPA while the yes by the below research on asthma, disabilities and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Because people allergic to birch pollen are more likely to develop such disabilities unless proper interventions, this material ...


1

??? Venting a portable A/C does not require "modifying" the window at all. You open the window, insert the exhaust-hose plate, close the window onto it, perhaps stuff some foam between the upper and lower pane, and you're done, without modifications to the window...


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They make air conditioning units with exhaust pipes for either the hot or the cold air. I once had a server room whose door was propped open 6” specifically to allow such a unit to blow air in there. Wasn't my design.


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In essence you could use duct to vent the hot air going out, but you should attach it to the AC for best results. You need cool air supplied to the sides of the AC which absorb the heat and transfer it away. Would a cassette AC work? I think it would work for the thread "How can I vent a portable air conditioner when there's no window?", but that wasn't ...


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The easy, but ugly solution is to cut a sheet of plywood that will fill the entire opening, and cut a hole in that to attach the AC exaust hose. Or cut the plywood to fit in beside the exaust hose, whichever is easier. Then insulate and seal the crap out of it with foam boards and metal tape. I would recommend avoiding portable AC if you can get one that ...


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HVAC Technicians must understand how to take proper measurements for Delta T and ambient temperatures along with the Wet Bulb temperatures. With a little math You really do not have a reason to crack into the refrigerant system. The industry in my area as a whole is quite vocal about moving away from the gauge on every PM approach. It is just time for ...


2

Obviously it is going to vary from one model to another, but I have 4 window units in my basement right now and they are all about 80% outside, measured from the flange that rests against the inside of the window sash. (The amount that is "outside" will also depend on the thickness of the window.) So I would say you're just about OK, depending on how ...


2

Annual maintenance is recommended by the manufacturers, and installers of the systems. The majority of the maintenance time, will be spent on cleaning the unit. Keeping the unit clean will help keep it running more efficiently, and can increase the life of the unit. The technician will inspect the unit to insure it's still in good condition, and will ...


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First, "recommended"? Coming from a contractor and engineer, it sounds like a good solution, and it will work. You don't need two fans. One with a transfer grille will do. Power-wise, I have to this in IP so bear with me. Room 1 is 5 x 7 x 3.28 x 3.28 = 376 ft^2. Rule of thumb- and this is only an estimate - is 400 sq ft \ 3.5 kW. (1 ton refrigeration = ...



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