Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

You may be looking at the problem backwards, the freezing lines could be a symptom of the problem not the cause. Start by looking for blockages in the system that would cause lower air flow / heat exchange. Dirty filters. Clogged ducts. Closed dampers. Closed/Blocked vent covers. Dirty coils. Basically if the system cannot exchange the heat/cold, it ...


12

Insulation will degrade over time. However, we're talking about decades, not months or even a few years. Even blown fiber or cellulose insulation should provide a good R-value for as long as the house is structurally sound; if you need to vacuum out and re-blow or re-lay insulation, chances are the house needs a LOT more work than that. What is probably ...


12

The logic involved is much more complex. Right now the logic is simple: if AC Mode and it's too hot, turn on AC, else turn off AC if Furnace mode and its too cold turn on furnace, else turn off furnace But the determination of when to switch between heating and cooling modes is much more complex - otherwise the ac would kick on, and it would get too ...


11

You'll want to check out the ENERGY STAR Air Conditioning Sizing Calculator.


11

A good deciduous tree helps, but it will take a while for that to work. Just be sure not to plant it too close to the foundation. Light blocking blinds are very good at blocking both heat and light. This may not be good if you're trying to work in the room. Insulation helps if you have an attic above, just don't block the ventilation from the soffits. ...


11

It's possible but it will be creating a situation where your a/c is fighting against itself, because you'll simply be redistributing the heat inside your house, instead of putting it on the outside. Why? Because the warm air will creep back into the room you were cooling, so the a/c will be acting like a big do-nothing machine - to a degree anyway. Mold ...


11

After reviewing the spec sheet for the unit i have found that the LX series has a variable speed blower that will allow the unit to operate under low ambient conditions. Is specifies the system can operate down to 20 degrees. Anything below this and the system will not operate. If you do not have the LX unit and do have the standard, the. The unit is not ...


10

A properly functioning and properly sized central air conditioning unit should be able to maintain the temperature of your house at any reasonable temperature you select. The amount of cooling available is related to the size of the system, insulation in the house, and finally outside air temperature. From your description I would guess either you don't ...


10

Unless you have the tools and knowledge, let the pros handle this one. I don't think this is really a diy project, there is a reason the installation cost is so high.


10

The technology is relatively young, and not as well known to consumers as traditional heating and cooling methods. The upfront costs of a geothermal system are also higher, and there are fewer companies around with the knowledge and tools to install the systems. In the US most homes are not built by the home owners, they are built by development companies ...


9

I seems to me that waxing the outside of the AC unit is only going to protect cosmetic appeal. If you're interested in keeping the unit looking nice from the outside, then it could help. Otherwise, I wouldn't put in the effort.


9

Old insulation may be of lower quality (less of an R value than what would typically be installed in a space). It could also become moldy in environments with high moisture. And if it's a loose fill (e.g. blown cellulose), it may compact over time, which reduces it's effectiveness. For your original issue, get yourself a contactless IR thermometer, walk ...


9

Disconnect the power Start by turning off the breaker, and pulling the serviceman disconnect, which will typically look something like this. This will insure no electricity is flowing to the condenser unit while you're working. Open the unit Next you'll want to disassemble the unit, to allow access to the electrical parts. This will vary from unit to ...


8

I live in South Florida and I too have to do this. My house has 2 AC systems. One of them clogs up after about 3-4 months, the other never has. I'm not sure what the difference is, but ever since I started putting a bit of bleach in the condensate line every time I change my filters; I've had no clogs since then. Assuming this is actually your problem, I ...


8

You are missing something. Either you have not found the correct breaker yet, or the breaker is not inside the breaker panel for your house. Walk through each breaker in the breaker planel for your house. You could have a mislabled breaker. (The breaker you are looking for is likely a two-pole 240V breaker, maybe 30 amps or better.) Since this is a ...


8

First I would check the electrical connections to the compressor and the breaker in the panel, see that they are tight and not corroded. Next I would measure the starting current of the compressor with a clamp on ammeter. I had a problem like this on a friends AC, only his problem was tripping the breaker at times. His compressor is about 10 years old, and ...


8

Check your unit's warranty. The heat exchangers on some units are warranteed for 20 years or longer. You may be able to get at least some money from the manufacturer, or a credit toward a new unit of the same brand. They may also cover all or part of the installation labor. Find out whether there are any federal or state tax incentives that could help. A ...


8

I ended up pulling the capacitor and testing it with my ohm meter. It was dead. I could have easily gone to the local HVAC supply, purchased a new capacitor for $30 and installed it myself. But, because I also wanted to have the pressure tested, I called in the guy who installed my furnace. He affirmed that I "did good", it was the capacitor. And ...


8

If you're confidant that the air leaving the house through the open window is warmer than the outside air that will come back in to replace it, I suppose it's OK to leave the window open. But I think a better solution would be to shut the AC off and use a window fan to circulate the cool outside air through the house. A window fan will be quieter and more ...


8

You may be able to rig up something whether the compressor-side air intake and exhaust are piped outside, but the efficiency will be low and you may risk burning out the compressor by working it too hard. If you want something you can install in a small opening, you might consider wheeled portable AC units which come with a flexible duct. If you're still ...


8

Black electrical tape over the light. Two layers if it is especially bright.


7

I have seen outside units whose paint has faded and become chalky-looking after several years of service. I suppose waxing it might prevent or delay this, but I agree with Doresoom that the benefit is really going to be mainly cosmetic.


7

There are several options. One of the easiest ways is a shade or awning over the window. (This is why Australian outback homesteads have deep verandahs.) Another method is an external shutter, but this will reduce the light a lot, as well. You could also go for a window coating. There are a number to choose from, ranging from an aluminium film to a fine ...


7

You could build a wood frame that fits in the window with an interior hole large enough to accommodate the AC unit. This also has the advantage that you won't have to hold the window open, while juggling the unit into place. You can install the light weight frame, then slide the unit into place. I built one when I lived on the second floor of an apartment ...


7

The reason the lights dim is because the fans on the AC units have a very large inductive startup load. Basically the power lines coming into the house just aren't able to handle the burst of energy that the AC unit is trying to pull. There isn't much that you can do about it, but it also isn't something you should worry about. This happens everywhere I ...


7

Because of the need to capture the refrigerant and licenses to get the refrigerant in most places, this typically isn't a DIY job. The fact that the outside unit is running and air is blowing inside suggests that it's not a problem with the thermostat. Check the breaker, air filters, and any other easy to access components for obvious problems. Beyond that, ...


7

Since hot rises, upper stories will tend to be warmer unless the design of your air conditioning system properly compensates for it. An energy audit, as mentioned in the comments by @mikes will tell you if you have any reasons for heat gain that may be correctable. Assuming you have a single thermostat that controls a unit that supplies both levels, here ...


7

The life of electrolytic capacitors is primarily shortened by heat. Therefore ambient temperature, temperature of nearby motors, ventilation and air circulation (e.g. fan), presence of thick layers of dust, clogged grilles, excess paint, ... can be important factors. Electrolytic capacitors are manufactured to various specifications: Capacitance: e.g. 1 ...


6

Talk to some local installers first. Unless you have a background in HVAC, I would say installing a geo is NOT a viable DIY project.


6

I tend to pour a cup of bleach down the line once a month. Without that at least in Florida you WILL get an algae backup in the line, which if you have bad overflow sensor can cause all kinds of fun water problems. If it is already blocked, just pour the bleach and let it sit. Eventually enough algae will die and the block will clear itself out.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible