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I have been researching this same question because I have about 1000 sqft of hardwood floors that have been covered by linoleum tile, carpet adhesive, paint overspray, and vinyl flooring glue. I found a few solutions on the internet and am going to try them this week. The most promising options I've seen are: Hand scrape with a solvent that will not stain ...


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I see that you have a copper tube coil inside that enclosure. My guess is that the experiment you are trying to accomplish requires that to be copper? If so, is there a reason that you couldn't transition away from copper to PVC inside the enclosure? If that is an option, then you are left with sealing PVC to PVC which is much easier. Of course, you ...


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I too have struggled with gluing copper and PVC for certain experiments. Silicone is an ok choice, depending on the pressure, but white silicone just happens to be less effective for sticking to stuff than clear silicone... I don't really know why, I just know that it is. It's kind of too late to use anything else now that you put silicone on it (actually ...


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I have a variety of glues in my shop, but for this, due to the heat, I would use a good quality of double sided tape. That's what is on the OE part. Aluminum can be glued to if you scuff-sand the gluing area (to provide rigid "tooth", microscopic peaks and canyons for the glue to mechanically engage) ... But rubber and rubbery plastics are always hard to ...


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Avoid the dust of sanding. Citristrip Gel. Orange color in plastic bottle. Get a quart, an $0.85 cent throw away brush, a 4 inch scraper (I prefer steel), a 1 inch putty knife, and a cheap plastic bucket. Put the gel on at least an eighth inch tuick on a square foot and leave it for 18-20 hours. It should eaisly scrape off.


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J-B Weld, LePage's Metal Epoxy should work as well.


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you can try wd40 or paint thinner also. most polycarbonates are not soluble in the methylated spirits or naptha that makes up the solvent in both of the above


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Use an orange oil based product like Goo Gone. If the glue is a water soluable material then just soak the case in warm water for a while. If you use the Goo Gone you will want to wash with warm soapy water afterwards to remove the oily film.


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Run the screw in reverse until it drills a hole for you in the drywall. Then sink it carefully. Down to the size of about 1.5" strips you can still use screws with this method. For anything smaller I'm partial to construction adhesives that act like liquid nails.


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Any common construction or project adhesive. That said, drywall nails are fairly thin for just that reason. If it's large enough that you're installing a patch, a nail won't destroy the patch. And that said, it's often the easiest solution to simply enlarge the patch to something suitable for repair, say 6" x 6". Float some one-by lumber or plywood scraps ...


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I have found an easy way if you are going to recover the floor with some other type of floor covering first i heat an iron and soften tile by laying iron over cloth so tile lifts easily then i sprinkle the floor with fine sawdust and rub in i leave the sawdust fir 15 minutes while lifting more tiles then brush off excess when completed the area i wish to ...



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