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6

I would spend the time to scrape it off. This will increase the contact area between the studs and the drywall, which in turn will give better stability. Stability is important because if there is any free play, the screws will move, and may eventually show through the paint. There are various scrapers available in your local home improvement store, in the ...


6

To answer your questions: "Why doesn't duct tape work for cables? Is it the fault of plasticizers? " - No -- it is more likely that exposure to air dries the glue, causing it to eventually lose its tack and become unstuck. This is also the reason that you're often left with sticky residue, as air was unable to penetrate to the underside of the glue. "Does ...


4

1) Heat gun - use a blow dryer or heat gun to soften the solution up. 2) Acetone - apply acetone to the spot. This will not penetrate the metal on the radiator. 3) Scrape - You can use an old t-shirt, stick the metal scraper inside the t-shirt and start chipping/smoothing away at the spot. Repeat until it gets almost level with the radiator. You probably ...


4

In most cases, a silicone based glue would adhere fairly well to most tiles. On smooth tiles it can be removed with a razor blade. On rougher tiles, a blade and a wire brush can get it off. The tiles need to be thoroughly cleaned before using (as with any glue). This is not as strong a bond as epoxy or construction adhesive, as suggested by Chris Cudmore, ...


4

I would use a two part epoxy for a permanent install. The only way you're getting it off is to chip away the underlying tile. Construction adhesive such as PL400 would also work. It's used to glue concrete pavers together when building a wall. However, it can become brittle over time and break off. If your attachments are ceramic as well, then the ...


4

If Bessey K style are not in the budget, Bessey H pipe end clamps are very economical, with new lengths available for the price of an iron (or steel) pipe. Found these on Amazon UK


4

Open Time* The amount of time the adhesive should be left to set, before it is covered. If you're gluing two sticks together, with an adhesive with 30 seconds open time. You should apply the glue to one stick, then wait at least 30 seconds before affixing the second stick. The amount of time the adhesive can be left before it is covered. If you're ...


3

There is a way to create such a composite timber. Actually, all other things being equal (the species, cut and quality of the wood), a built up sandwich is actually stronger than a solid piece of wood. This is done by laminating the three boards together. A generous layer of wood glue, such as Titebond II, is spread over one face of one of the boards. The ...


3

You have a dilemma. The strongest removable glue bases hooks, such as Command, appear to be rated to to hold a maximum of only 7.5 lbs. Even if you double these up, you are at 15 lbs. It might be possible to rig a series of hooks to spread the load, but it would take a careful rigging to avoid having all the weight on the two outside hooks. This is not a ...


3

Superconductor An element, inter-metallic alloy, or compound that will conduct electricity without resistance below a certain temperature. Resistance is undesirable because it produces losses in the energy flowing through the material. Once set in motion, electrical current will flow forever in a closed loop of superconducting material - making it the ...


2

Scrape off all the old adhesives then use Liquid Nails on the back. Pre-drill, countersink, and screw it into the door. You can use caulk, liquid nails, or wood filler to fill in over screw holes and then re-prime and paint.


2

My suggestion would be to embed square tube stock steel into the MDF and epoxy it in. I recently did this exact thing with MDF subtop for my granite counters and uses a polyurethane glue to embed the steel. Check out the pictures here: Can I support a granite countertop overhang with embedded steel bars? Square stock is rigid and cheap. Route a channel ...


2

There is no reason to glue down engineered hardwood floor to an underlayment. This is just for initial aesthetics. The glue will NEVER last (in a residential setting). The only thing the glue will do is give you fits and make your install seem tighter. Within weeks or months the glue will come loose and you will have a floating floor. Nothing wrong with ...


2

You could try these heavy-duty mounting squares They're rated for up to 1 lb. According to the specs, your switch weighs 0.6 lbs. It will fall every time someone trips over a cord, but that is preferable to the whole shelf coming down like with a screw or zip-tie.


2

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


2

A low cost general purpose spray bottle purchased at a hardware store... Filled with a mixture of 75% / 25% Hot water and Windex... Works surprisingly well to soften and aid in removal of paper and water based glues. Spray application permits just the right amount of moisture to be applied to the wall without large amounts of excess to run off make a ...


2

Some sort of 2 part epoxy should hold up pretty well. Araldite is a common brand in the UK. For best results, try to remove the old glue so the bond is to the plastic itself, scuff both surfaces with sandpaper, then clean with something like alcohol to ensure the best bond. Allow to dry before applying epoxy. It's important to use the specified proportions ...


1

Beware that if in a use that is subject to plumbing code, your 3D printed item almost certainly will be a code violation. The probable best bet (and I'm not guaranteeing success) would be a "Multipurpose plastic pipe glue" - go to the plumbing section, find the PVC pipe cement, don't buy that - look for the somewhat smaller stock of pipe cement that claims ...


1

Yes you can. I have my guys use Liquid Nails for ceilings. We still add screws but not really sure you HAVE TO. Definitely nothing wrong with using the correct adhesive for a few studs on a piece of drywall.


1

Sometimes it takes a village. Here's a summary of what ended up working: The first layer of tiling came off without too much trouble by using a heavy duty paint scraper (with a slight bend to it) and a hammer. I was able to get through this in less than an hour. The second layer was much harder. I believe @Ecnerwal was right in that it was actually a layer ...


1

I feel your pain, I have run into this many times. It may be necessary to use a Sonic/ vibrating tool like a Rockwell Sonic Crafter with a scraping blade. You may damage the wood a little, bit it will sand out. Don't use water, it can damage the underlaying wood and seep into the subfloor. The center of the floor is always the hardest to strip. Foot ...


1

You are either going to use glue which has melting points - I can't believe that there are no glues that can't handle computer heat - or caulk/silicone which may handle heat better but has some elasticity to it so it may move or have issues too. Really best options are epoxy or weld it. If you don't want either of those than you have to choose the one of ...


1

I have had to go through this a few times recently. You can try hot water or some kind of remover but you may be making a liquid mess where you adhesive just spreads out. I have found the fastest way of dealing with it is chiseling for a small area or power scraping - rent one or I personally own one that hooks up to compressor - scraper was like $15 at ...


1

It depends on the adhesive. For tile mastic, I've used this on concrete before and it worked amazingly well (if but a tad messy): http://www.franmar.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=84 It also smells funny, but is completely non-toxic.


1

I have a similar torch/Flashlight and have had the exact same problem.. I fixed mine with a product called Q-Bond. On my flashlight, the magnet was flush (ie not resessed) and I was able to build up a sidewall to add extra strength. Needless to say... the magnet has not come off (and yes, this is from years of camping in the heat/cold/rain etc.)


1

You can use a soldering iron with a small pointed tip to heat the perimeter of the recessed area the magnet sets in. After it heats up, put the magnet in place, and the tip of the iron about 1/4" away. Then push the iron down and towards the magnet until the plastic melts and some of it overlaps the magnet, or, wedges it in place. Do this 3 or four times ...


1

Laminate is usually held on with contact cement similar to this This type of adhesive is spread on both surfaces to be joined, allowed to dry and then pressed together. Pressing firmly with a small wooden roller (or a rolling pin) helps make the bond tight. It is important to make sure the parts are perfectly aligned before the surfaces touch because ...


1

On its website it says 8-10 hours. However it is not for the application you used it for. It is for gluing wood to things. Not for gluing foam/felt/whatever to concrete. Your underlayment has basically formed a bubble underneath. The wood glue needs a lot of air to dry - hence wood glue there will usually be a lot of air available. Now that the outside ...


1

Gaffer tape doesn't leave the horrible residue of duct tape and may be strong enough to hold cables to a wall. In my experience, in every application longer than a few days, duct tape either leaves a sticky residue or a crumbly, dried-adhesive residue, both of which are quite difficult to remove. Because I've seen this on many surfaces, I conclude that the ...


1

What you're wanting are called "Sash clamps". Some people call them bar clamps. You can join them simply with a good PVA glue. But personally I prefer to dowel them as well for added strength. With this sort of length you'll want to put at least 3 clamps on the bottom and 2 on top to help keep it flat and wind it up tight to make a nice wide board. The ...



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