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3

It's probably not going to be as simple as "tighten up the bolts" - mysteriously unscrewing themselves is a low likelihood .vs. "there's some deterioration in the wall where they attach" which will need to be addressed. Or "Someone sat on the sink and stressed them/the wood they were attached to." So, the sink probably needs to come off to effect a lasting ...


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Superglue works best when spread in a thin layer, a "blob" will take longer to harden because a thin skin forms on the surface, slowing the curing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate In general, cyanoacrylate is an acrylic resin that rapidly polymerises in the presence of water (specifically hydroxide ions), forming long, strong chains, ...


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First, I agree with diceless, it is probably perfectly legal for the homeowner, to deal with this problem himself (assuming no part of the house is rented to a third party). On the other hand, I agree with Mazura, you may be opening a huge can of worms here. Since we are only talking about 2 bedrooms, I have to question the cost and time effectiveness of ...


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I typically use Goo Gone (US product), will remove most. Rubbing Alcohol is another item that works for some adhesive. Or clorox wipes also works on some.


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Super glue might work, although my first thought was to finish the mdf with polyurethane first. This will seal the mdf and allow the adhesive to remain sticky for a long time. Rubbing superglue on the area before the velcro goes on might get the same result too if you don't want to finish the whole thing. I think this is what's going on : the mdf is very ...


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There is no Do-It-Yourself asbestos abatement process that meets US construction industry standards for safety and the protection of air quality. The only proper methods for renovating structures containing asbestos bearing building materials require removal and/or encapsulation by professionals experienced in the area. There is no silver bullet in a ...


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What about velcroing through the screen, then sticking another piece on the back, basically making a velcro frame around the screen? This is hard to explain, here's a diagram: AAAAAAAAAA LLLLLLLLLL SSSSSSSSSS HHHHHHHHHH AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA LLLLLLLLLL HHHHHHHHHH AAAAAAAAAA FFFFFFFFFF The first 2 rows (AL) are one piece of velcro, loop side, with the ...


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Yes, you can paint plasterboard directly - it's usually just paper on the outside. (Moisture resisting plasterboard tends to have a foil on on side though, which probably won't take paint well). What paint you use will depend what finish (or colours) you want, but you're unlikely to have problems using either emulsion or undercoat and gloss (or matt or ...


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You don't remove it. The silicone is probably just to secure the pipe to the wall - so it doesn't wiggle or so that air doesn't get in. If you need access to the pipe I would cut the white pipe. This would allow you to fully snake anything below. Chances are pretty high that all of these pipes are glued very well together. They are not meant to wiggle ...


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Sure you can. It will be a better water deterrent than painted sheetrock and will certainly be easier to maintain and clean. Is it recommended? Probably not. But not everything has to be approved. I would adhere Formica with the same mastic for applying vinyl tile. It is easy to apply and work, and has more than adequate adhesion.


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I found this answer for you on this forum: Henkel/Loctite's Hysol series and 3M's Scotch-Weld epoxies are good choices. Surface preparation is critical. Review standards on this subject for best practices: ASTM D 2651 Standard Guide for Preparation of Metal Surfaces for Adhesive Bonding and ISO 17212 Structural adhesives -- Guidelines for the surface ...


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Re-did some floors a couple of years ago with the same situation, two layers of carpets on hardwood floor with the bottom layer glued down. We used heat gun and scrapers to remove most of it, and then some glue remover on the worst parts. After doing this the person that came in and re-did our floors said that was not needed, especially the glue remover. He ...


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You could try running a putty knife or something behind them, but my actual advice for removing them is to have the spackle or drywall compound and paint handy, as scars are to be expected. Hmm - heat (as from a hair dryer - not so much as to scorch paint) might also help loosen the adhesive a bit. As for the left-behind adhesive the usual suspects - ...


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Superglue will not fill the voids well enough between the wall and the wood frame. There are picture hooks with a special adhesive that may work for your purpose. See here, there is a variety on this link


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I assume by "bed base" you are referring to the box spring? Take some long strips of cardboard and staple it to the bottom of the box spring, over top of the fabric covering. Use some double-sided carpet tape or another type of adhesive to secure the strips to the cardboard. This has the added benefit that it's easy to remove and doesn't damage the box ...


1

What you can do by hand is fairly limited. Wallpaper is adhesive backed, but slightly repositionable. If what you have sticks strongly at first contact, your choices are limited. I would suggest the following, Use a roller, as wide as possible, and of rubber. This should eliminate most bubbles and creases. Go slow. This will allow you to catch and fix ...


1

If the glue is still tacky at all (or ever was), Laquer Thinner or "Goof Off" may be a good solvent. If the glue is a hard type glue such as Elmer's or a Wood glue, your best bet is to try to chip off as much as possible with a sharp pocket knife. Then a block sander or electric sander may work OK for the rest. Or if you have access to a flat bastard file ...


1

There is a product Roberts cove moulding adhesive - I am sure there are other things better and worse. Something I consider critical for the project is a Cove shozzle, again a roberts product - it fits on a caulking tube of the stuff, well i guess anyone's product in a caulk tube, and spreads it out wide, so you do not get the kind of squish out, or one ...


1

I used stainless steel pipe clamps and that fixed the leaks. Next time I will order the appropriate metric pieces from the original vendor.


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Carefully cut as much of the glue as possible with a utility knife. With a small pry bar, cats paw, or flat bar gently pry at the gap. If you can, cut some more glue while prying. you may also consider wedging a paint scraper,( not to be confused with a putty knife) in the gap, then hitting it with a hammer. At this point you have to weigh the risk of ...


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Just stick the hook side of the velcro to the window frames then press the netting onto the hooks directly


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I would recommend that you reuse the furring. Here is my reasoning It's already there. It will cost more to remove it than reuse it It will provide space to run electrical, network, phone, coax, etc wiring Unless you head height is really low, the 1.5" will not be missed too much. Essentially, you have a 'service cavity'. You can place low profile can ...


1

in my experience, let it dry first - just as you would let joint comound dry...dry to the touch and firm. I've pushed the envelope on a couple of occassions and what enbds up happening is the thinset shrinks as it dries, sucking the tile in, and causing a hairline crack.


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Cleanup Clean tools and uncured adhesive residue immediately with mineral spirits in a well-ventilated area to the outdoors. Remove cured adhesive by carefully scraping with a sharp-edged tool. From http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/pl_ca_prem/directions/Loctite-PL-Premium-Polyurethane-Construction-Adhesive.htm


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It is just black mortar. They sell mortar in many different colors along with powdered coloring you can add to make just about any color you want. Mortar is used between brick and block to seal the joint from the elements, and to lock the bricks together (among other things). In the picture above, it is not used to lock the bricks together or weatherproof ...


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AFAIR, asbestos mastic is much more likely with tile (which may itself contain asbestos) - I would not expect it under carpet, other than as a remnant of a prior tile job (no sign of that here.) And, as you have noted, it doesn't look like it. While you could engage full paranoia (as the folks that make money from it like) and have it tested, you can ...


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First, test the adhesive. If it does have asbestos, you are stuck. If it doesn't your life is going to be easy. Here is the reason why they recommend complete removal of the wood. Asbestos removal requires two things: Enveloping the entire area, basically making a sealed air tight work area that can be removed once work is done. This would be walls and ...


1

If you will first thoroughly wet all the pertinent surfaces, your shower curtain will cling all by itself and greatly reduce the irritating billowing and waving, also the leaks to the outside on both ends. I just toss handfuls of water everywhere I want the curtain to seal off and stick down. Good luck-



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