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5

Silicone caulk or silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) glue (pretty much the same thing with different labels.) Sticks pretty well, moisture helps it cure, and it can be peeled off when you want it gone.


4

If you can, I would recommend cutting down the joint with a thin bandsaw blade & then machining both pieces with a jointer to get the super tight fit that you really should have between your boards. The reason I suggest this is that cutting boards can give up particles when sliced/chopped on that would end up on the food that is processed on the cutting ...


4

Forget trying to glue it, repair it some other way. "McGyver" it. Like maybe buy a lock hasp of appropriate size and use the staple, which is the piece that the lock shackle would go through (see picture). Sorry I could not find a picture of just the staple. Screw the staple to the speaker body and the staple hole would rest in the base, aligned with the ...


3

For drain covers with no screw holes and no option of screwing in itself we usually slap some plumber's putty on the bottom and smash it in. With a screwdriver and a few tugs you can remove and reuse again but should keep it from moving.


3

Superglue works best when spread in a thin layer, a "blob" will take longer to harden because a thin skin forms on the surface, slowing the curing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate In general, cyanoacrylate is an acrylic resin that rapidly polymerises in the presence of water (specifically hydroxide ions), forming long, strong chains, ...


3

It's probably not going to be as simple as "tighten up the bolts" - mysteriously unscrewing themselves is a low likelihood .vs. "there's some deterioration in the wall where they attach" which will need to be addressed. Or "Someone sat on the sink and stressed them/the wood they were attached to." So, the sink probably needs to come off to effect a lasting ...


2

I found this answer for you on this forum: Henkel/Loctite's Hysol series and 3M's Scotch-Weld epoxies are good choices. Surface preparation is critical. Review standards on this subject for best practices: ASTM D 2651 Standard Guide for Preparation of Metal Surfaces for Adhesive Bonding and ISO 17212 Structural adhesives -- Guidelines for the surface ...


2

Superglue will not fill the voids well enough between the wall and the wood frame. There are picture hooks with a special adhesive that may work for your purpose. See here, there is a variety on this link


2

You could try running a putty knife or something behind them, but my actual advice for removing them is to have the spackle or drywall compound and paint handy, as scars are to be expected. Hmm - heat (as from a hair dryer - not so much as to scorch paint) might also help loosen the adhesive a bit. As for the left-behind adhesive the usual suspects - ...


2

I assume by "bed base" you are referring to the box spring? Take some long strips of cardboard and staple it to the bottom of the box spring, over top of the fabric covering. Use some double-sided carpet tape or another type of adhesive to secure the strips to the cardboard. This has the added benefit that it's easy to remove and doesn't damage the box ...


2

It is a good idea not to glue or make the grate non-removable in case access to the drain is needed in the future. For a fast non-adhesive fix to keep the grate in-place wrap a rubber band around the grates edge.


2

Re-did some floors a couple of years ago with the same situation, two layers of carpets on hardwood floor with the bottom layer glued down. We used heat gun and scrapers to remove most of it, and then some glue remover on the worst parts. After doing this the person that came in and re-did our floors said that was not needed, especially the glue remover. He ...


2

With a light touch on the screws you will be able to attach the numbers. Drill the surface with a slightly smaller bit than the threads, not the shank of the screws. An 1/8" bit may be the right size... Run the screws in and if you like put a small dab of clear caulk behind the number to seal the screw to the number and the screw to the hole so water may not ...


2

If it's polystyrene, you'll probably get the best bond with modelling glue - it's as close to a weld as you can get with that type of plastic. You'll want to get all of the epoxy off first though - otherwise you won't get a decent weld. Since it is obviously a high stress part, I'd drill and pin it with piano wire in at least a couple places. That said, I ...


1

It is polyurethane. Much easier to slice than to grind, as it tends to get a bit gummy, and the things that you glue (e.g. wood) tend to be softer than the glue itself, meaning that you are risking damaging the workpiece. If you had to, I'd use a vibrating oscilating mini-saw on a nultifunction tool but I generally just use a razor.


1

I believe it is the same product and can be used in either job as a primer or as an additive to give the concrete more resiliency and plasticity. Your description makes it sound like the same product here in N.A. To be sure it can function as a primer try this test: using a paint brush apply it full strength to a clean out of sight concrete surface. If after ...


1

Bucket of hot water and a utility knife is what I use. Let tool sit in bucket. Sometimes after a couple minutes you can just touch the glue and it falls apart. If it is a strong glue it will pop off with the utility knife. The hot water is the fastest way I know because it heats both the glue and the tool. Heating the tool causes its molecules to ...


1

The approach is usually progressive. You try a less aggressive cleaner to see if it works, and if not, then move on to a more aggressive. At some point, you may find that the cleaner damages the surface, so test in an inconspicuous area. I would use paper towels and a mild scrubbing pad, and I would use cleaners in the following order: a soap based ...


1

If the glue is still tacky at all (or ever was), Laquer Thinner or "Goof Off" may be a good solvent. If the glue is a hard type glue such as Elmer's or a Wood glue, your best bet is to try to chip off as much as possible with a sharp pocket knife. Then a block sander or electric sander may work OK for the rest. Or if you have access to a flat bastard file ...


1

If you don't mind it being permanent, 2 part epoxy should work. You just need to figure out a way to keep the strip clamped to the bed until the epoxy sets. (Maybe a 2x4 wedged below the light strip.)


1

Epoxy is not a bonding agent; it is a filler. Use something that is called plastic cement, or melt the pieces together. Epoxy only works well for bonding if the surfaces are rough such that the epoxy can fill the voids on each side of the bond. Epoxy's internal strength is high, but it does not attach well to anything, so it can generally be pulled right off ...


1

I did mine with clear silicone. Everything must be bone dry before application. Just push the escutcheon flush to the wall and apply silicone around the outside where it meets the wall. The key to a good job with silicon is to make sure you don't over apply. Nothing is worse than having silicone spread out an inch past where it's supposed to be, especially ...


1

You typically want pavers sitting on top of a sand and compacted rock base. This allows for some movement as needed and some drainage if needed. If you are in a freeze/thaw climate, adhering the pavers to the sidewalk likely wouldn't work very well as water will eventually get under the pavers and start cracking everything a it freezes. Ideally, you're ...


1

I have never tried to adhere pavers to a sidewalk, but can't say I wouldn't recommend it. Instead I would install paver edging along the edges of the sidewalk and set the pavers in between them. Then I would fill in between the pavers in with polymeric sand to lock them in. Paver edging:


1

I would begin with a cardboard pattern. You could measure each distance, lay them out on the right edge of the cardboard. Or you could use profile gauge such as this one. I would then do a rough cut of the cardboard, lay it into the corner, and trim to precision. Do not cut the left edge until the end. Then transfer the profile onto the molding. On the ...


1

What you can do by hand is fairly limited. Wallpaper is adhesive backed, but slightly repositionable. If what you have sticks strongly at first contact, your choices are limited. I would suggest the following, Use a roller, as wide as possible, and of rubber. This should eliminate most bubbles and creases. Go slow. This will allow you to catch and fix ...


1

There is a product Roberts cove moulding adhesive - I am sure there are other things better and worse. Something I consider critical for the project is a Cove shozzle, again a roberts product - it fits on a caulking tube of the stuff, well i guess anyone's product in a caulk tube, and spreads it out wide, so you do not get the kind of squish out, or one ...


1

I used stainless steel pipe clamps and that fixed the leaks. Next time I will order the appropriate metric pieces from the original vendor.


1

Carefully cut as much of the glue as possible with a utility knife. With a small pry bar, cats paw, or flat bar gently pry at the gap. If you can, cut some more glue while prying. you may also consider wedging a paint scraper,( not to be confused with a putty knife) in the gap, then hitting it with a hammer. At this point you have to weigh the risk of ...


1

Just stick the hook side of the velcro to the window frames then press the netting onto the hooks directly



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