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42

Yes! the tool is called a caulk gun. Use the spout cutter for cutting off the tip of the tube; then use the seal punch tool for poking holes in the foil seal.


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Silicone caulk or silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) glue (pretty much the same thing with different labels.) Sticks pretty well, moisture helps it cure, and it can be peeled off when you want it gone.


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If you can, I would recommend cutting down the joint with a thin bandsaw blade & then machining both pieces with a jointer to get the super tight fit that you really should have between your boards. The reason I suggest this is that cutting boards can give up particles when sliced/chopped on that would end up on the food that is processed on the cutting ...


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Forget trying to glue it, repair it some other way. "McGyver" it. Like maybe buy a lock hasp of appropriate size and use the staple, which is the piece that the lock shackle would go through (see picture). Sorry I could not find a picture of just the staple. Screw the staple to the speaker body and the staple hole would rest in the base, aligned with the ...


4

For drain covers with no screw holes and no option of screwing in itself we usually slap some plumber's putty on the bottom and smash it in. With a screwdriver and a few tugs you can remove and reuse again but should keep it from moving.


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It is a good idea not to glue or make the grate non-removable in case access to the drain is needed in the future. For a fast non-adhesive fix to keep the grate in-place wrap a rubber band around the grates edge.


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Any common construction or project adhesive. That said, drywall nails are fairly thin for just that reason. If it's large enough that you're installing a patch, a nail won't destroy the patch. And that said, it's often the easiest solution to simply enlarge the patch to something suitable for repair, say 6" x 6". Float some one-by lumber or plywood scraps ...


2

I assume by "bed base" you are referring to the box spring? Take some long strips of cardboard and staple it to the bottom of the box spring, over top of the fabric covering. Use some double-sided carpet tape or another type of adhesive to secure the strips to the cardboard. This has the added benefit that it's easy to remove and doesn't damage the box ...


2

With a light touch on the screws you will be able to attach the numbers. Drill the surface with a slightly smaller bit than the threads, not the shank of the screws. An 1/8" bit may be the right size... Run the screws in and if you like put a small dab of clear caulk behind the number to seal the screw to the number and the screw to the hole so water may not ...


2

It depends on just 2 things. What you're doing & what the labeling says. I use Loctite Power Grab for most of my situations & I haven't had a single issue yet, but I've only just gotten to 10-years on stuff where I first used it. Liquid Nails though I don't use ever. Because, I found it in multiple situations & renovations where it was barely 10-...


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If it's polystyrene, you'll probably get the best bond with modelling glue - it's as close to a weld as you can get with that type of plastic. You'll want to get all of the epoxy off first though - otherwise you won't get a decent weld. Since it is obviously a high stress part, I'd drill and pin it with piano wire in at least a couple places. That said, I ...


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I recently built a sandwich as hitting platform for a golf simulator; two pieces of 1/4" plywood with 2" styrofoam insulation in the middle. Spray adhesive failed. I then used the Liquid Nails Panel adhesive and it is working well.


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If I was making a shim, I would not want the grain running the short way since it will tend to disintegrate under load and time. Ideally 7/8 plywood, partly because it is harder wood... otherwise plane or rip 2x6 or two 2x4s to the desired thickness, or 1x6 if the thickness will suffice. I would also glue and screw it.


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I too have struggled with gluing copper and PVC for certain experiments. Silicone is an ok choice, depending on the pressure, but white silicone just happens to be less effective for sticking to stuff than clear silicone... I don't really know why, I just know that it is. It's kind of too late to use anything else now that you put silicone on it (actually ...


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A knife to cut the tip at the desired spot, and a nail to puncture the seal inside. You'll use the nail later to hold the partially-used tube. I remember as a kid never having any of that built into the caulking gun. Later, when I tried one that had a handy "cigar clipper" thing on the handle, I thought it was terrible, not allowing easy selection of the ...


1

since its rigid and brittle, its most likely an epoxy. the only solvent i know of that will dissolve it will be methylene chloride. hard to get, carcinogenic, but good solvent for this. just make sure you wear silicone gloves (get a bunch as it can dissolve certain silicones too) and a full face respirator with a VOC cartridge or two in it. you can get ...


1

It looks like an Epoxy adhesive. Chipping away is okay if your careful. But, try a single sided razor blade. A lot of the time you get right under it & almost peel it off. You can also lightly hammer these types of razor blades. Holding it with gloves or with pliers. You'll also want the razor blade to actually scrape or peel any residue away after the ...


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If you use foam board adhesives with solvent will dissolve the foam and not grip as well. I have used PL300 from loctite or you could use an equivalent. It has worked well bonding to concrete and wood. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Loctite-PL300-10-fl-oz-Foamboard-VOC-Adhesive-1421941/202020476 Good luck!


1

To get a quick grab, use the pull-apart technique with panel adhesive that's suitable for foam. (Standard construction adhesive has solvents that ruin foam, and therefore don't bond.) Apply the adhesive in a suitable pattern using about a 1/4" bead. Press the components firmly together, then pull them apart. Let them sit exposed to the air for a few minutes,...


1

The "strongest" thing that I have ever found for attatching styrofoam was silicone. My opinion is that silicone works well because it is soft and seeps into the crevices between the styrofoam pearls. But silicone takes 24 hours to dry; also you may want/need to rough-sand the steel to help the silicone stick to it. Another ok choice for much less money is ...


1

I believe it is the same product and can be used in either job as a primer or as an additive to give the concrete more resiliency and plasticity. Your description makes it sound like the same product here in N.A. To be sure it can function as a primer try this test: using a paint brush apply it full strength to a clean out of sight concrete surface. If after ...


1

Bucket of hot water and a utility knife is what I use. Let tool sit in bucket. Sometimes after a couple minutes you can just touch the glue and it falls apart. If it is a strong glue it will pop off with the utility knife. The hot water is the fastest way I know because it heats both the glue and the tool. Heating the tool causes its molecules to ...


1

If both surfaces to be joined are fairly flat than contact cement will bond them together with a strong grip. Use the contact cement that isn't labled as "green" or "environmentally safe". Get the type with high VOC's it is stronger and will hold longer. If any of the surfaces aren't flat you should use an adhesive that is thick or gel-like. I've had great ...


1

some glue that will set as rubber That would be something like Sugru Sugru is mouldable glue. Stick it, shape it and it will turn into rubber. I don't know whether it will adhere well to aluminium and whatever polymer Apple use for "plastic" feet. However they do say: Sugru sticks permanently to lots of stuff like ceramics, glass, metal, wood, ...


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It is polyurethane. Much easier to slice than to grind, as it tends to get a bit gummy, and the things that you glue (e.g. wood) tend to be softer than the glue itself, meaning that you are risking damaging the workpiece. If you had to, I'd use a vibrating oscilating mini-saw on a nultifunction tool but I generally just use a razor.


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The glue used by the floor covering industry to adhere carpet to a floor is one of the most tenacious, and laborious bonds to break. If you want to burn some calories grab some knee pads and a 6 inch floor scraper (and some extra blades). Use a sweeping arch to slice the residual adhesive from the floor. Or, if possible, rent a 17 inch floor scrubber/buffer ...


1

I have found an easy way if you are going to recover the floor with some other type of floor covering first i heat an iron and soften tile by laying iron over cloth so tile lifts easily then i sprinkle the floor with fine sawdust and rub in i leave the sawdust fir 15 minutes while lifting more tiles then brush off excess when completed the area i wish to ...


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The approach is usually progressive. You try a less aggressive cleaner to see if it works, and if not, then move on to a more aggressive. At some point, you may find that the cleaner damages the surface, so test in an inconspicuous area. I would use paper towels and a mild scrubbing pad, and I would use cleaners in the following order: a soap based ...


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If you don't mind it being permanent, 2 part epoxy should work. You just need to figure out a way to keep the strip clamped to the bed until the epoxy sets. (Maybe a 2x4 wedged below the light strip.)


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Epoxy is not a bonding agent; it is a filler. Use something that is called plastic cement, or melt the pieces together. Epoxy only works well for bonding if the surfaces are rough such that the epoxy can fill the voids on each side of the bond. Epoxy's internal strength is high, but it does not attach well to anything, so it can generally be pulled right off ...



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