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6

I would spend the time to scrape it off. This will increase the contact area between the studs and the drywall, which in turn will give better stability. Stability is important because if there is any free play, the screws will move, and may eventually show through the paint. There are various scrapers available in your local home improvement store, in the ...


5

A good drywall adhesive has much more shear strength than screws - and this is just when your glue is on the framing. So if you are doubling up the drywall gluing makes a ton of sense. Just recently my drywall guys started using glue and I can say this, I hope I never have to demo these places because the drywall is ATTACHED. All this being said the ...


4

1) Heat gun - use a blow dryer or heat gun to soften the solution up. 2) Acetone - apply acetone to the spot. This will not penetrate the metal on the radiator. 3) Scrape - You can use an old t-shirt, stick the metal scraper inside the t-shirt and start chipping/smoothing away at the spot. Repeat until it gets almost level with the radiator. You probably ...


4

In most cases, a silicone based glue would adhere fairly well to most tiles. On smooth tiles it can be removed with a razor blade. On rougher tiles, a blade and a wire brush can get it off. The tiles need to be thoroughly cleaned before using (as with any glue). This is not as strong a bond as epoxy or construction adhesive, as suggested by Chris Cudmore, ...


4

I would use a two part epoxy for a permanent install. The only way you're getting it off is to chip away the underlying tile. Construction adhesive such as PL400 would also work. It's used to glue concrete pavers together when building a wall. However, it can become brittle over time and break off. If your attachments are ceramic as well, then the ...


4

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


4

Open Time* The amount of time the adhesive should be left to set, before it is covered. If you're gluing two sticks together, with an adhesive with 30 seconds open time. You should apply the glue to one stick, then wait at least 30 seconds before affixing the second stick. The amount of time the adhesive can be left before it is covered. If you're ...


4

If they aren't level, and scraping is too daunting, I suggest sistering new studs to the existing ones but have them stick out 1/8 inch. I'd suggest using metal ones as that'd make the job extremely quick.


3

Most products you purchase will have the information on the label. If no information is provided you can look for a marking similar to the following that will help you identify the type of plastic it was made with. ABS does not have a symbol, but is often marked >ABS<. In your case, I'd look around the base of the hose reel you should be able to find ...


3

If there is a lot of glue I would definitely spend the money on an oscillating tool and get one of the cutting tools. It should make quick work of getting the glue off but won't be as aggressive/damaging as a reciprocating saw.


3

There is a way to create such a composite timber. Actually, all other things being equal (the species, cut and quality of the wood), a built up sandwich is actually stronger than a solid piece of wood. This is done by laminating the three boards together. A generous layer of wood glue, such as Titebond II, is spread over one face of one of the boards. The ...


3

No glue needed. the angle of the cleat and gravity does to trick. It will not need it but you can run a screw into the framing to solve any issue you may have.


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


2

Does the container for the adhesive suggest anything for cleanup? Maybe mineral spirits or acetone? Be careful with those on your tiles though. Maybe "goof off" would work.


2

A low cost general purpose spray bottle purchased at a hardware store... Filled with a mixture of 75% / 25% Hot water and Windex... Works surprisingly well to soften and aid in removal of paper and water based glues. Spray application permits just the right amount of moisture to be applied to the wall without large amounts of excess to run off make a ...


2

Elmer's glue is water soluble. Just soak it with warm water and let it sit for 10 minutes. If that fails a power washer certainly do it.


2

You could try these heavy-duty mounting squares They're rated for up to 1 lb. According to the specs, your switch weighs 0.6 lbs. It will fall every time someone trips over a cord, but that is preferable to the whole shelf coming down like with a screw or zip-tie.


2

Some sort of 2 part epoxy should hold up pretty well. Araldite is a common brand in the UK. For best results, try to remove the old glue so the bond is to the plastic itself, scuff both surfaces with sandpaper, then clean with something like alcohol to ensure the best bond. Allow to dry before applying epoxy. It's important to use the specified proportions ...


2

Highly recommend for removing the liquid nail, a very sharp wood chisel will do just fine with a little effort. If the liquid nail is only 1/8 thick then no problem, just hang right over it.


2

The common 2 part epoxies from the hardware store or home center are NOT waterproof. I learned this the hard way using them on boat projects. If you are going to use epoxy, it's worth the few extra bucks for a good one, like WEST System. You will probably also want some fillers like colloidal silica or glass micro beads to control the viscosity and sag of ...


2

Do you need the fire resistance and sound-deadening of drywall, or just want the look? You might consider something else that would look quite similar but not have the weight. I put textured paintable wallpaper over wood paneling, like this textured wallpaper. Once painted, it blended right in with the drywalled wall next to it. Nobody knows it isn't ...


2

The easy thing to do would be Liquid Nails and I am pretty sure they have a stone version. A better solution would be some thinset. I do not agree with silicone because it has a little give in it. After a while of kicking or stepping on it will lose its grip a bit and eventually come loose.


1

Beware that if in a use that is subject to plumbing code, your 3D printed item almost certainly will be a code violation. The probable best bet (and I'm not guaranteeing success) would be a "Multipurpose plastic pipe glue" - go to the plumbing section, find the PVC pipe cement, don't buy that - look for the somewhat smaller stock of pipe cement that claims ...


1

After 30+ years in the plastics industry, my tried and true method is to take a scraping of the plastic piece and burn it, extinguish the flame and smell the smoke. Polyolefins will catch fire, smell like candles (a paraffin based plastic); PVC won't usually ignite, smells like chlorine and will burn your nose - BE CAREFUL; ABS has a sweet smell and burns ...


1

Yes you can. I have my guys use Liquid Nails for ceilings. We still add screws but not really sure you HAVE TO. Definitely nothing wrong with using the correct adhesive for a few studs on a piece of drywall.


1

Sometimes it takes a village. Here's a summary of what ended up working: The first layer of tiling came off without too much trouble by using a heavy duty paint scraper (with a slight bend to it) and a hammer. I was able to get through this in less than an hour. The second layer was much harder. I believe @Ecnerwal was right in that it was actually a layer ...


1

I feel your pain, I have run into this many times. It may be necessary to use a Sonic/ vibrating tool like a Rockwell Sonic Crafter with a scraping blade. You may damage the wood a little, bit it will sand out. Don't use water, it can damage the underlaying wood and seep into the subfloor. The center of the floor is always the hardest to strip. Foot ...


1

You are either going to use glue which has melting points - I can't believe that there are no glues that can't handle computer heat - or caulk/silicone which may handle heat better but has some elasticity to it so it may move or have issues too. Really best options are epoxy or weld it. If you don't want either of those than you have to choose the one of ...


1

I have had to go through this a few times recently. You can try hot water or some kind of remover but you may be making a liquid mess where you adhesive just spreads out. I have found the fastest way of dealing with it is chiseling for a small area or power scraping - rent one or I personally own one that hooks up to compressor - scraper was like $15 at ...


1

I've used hot water for laminate glue on concrete and rented a floor stripper. For construction adhesive you might want to consult with a local hardware store and see what popular adhesive removers are available in your area. Unfortunately in my experience this is hard work.



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