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3

Superglue works best when spread in a thin layer, a "blob" will take longer to harden because a thin skin forms on the surface, slowing the curing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate In general, cyanoacrylate is an acrylic resin that rapidly polymerises in the presence of water (specifically hydroxide ions), forming long, strong chains, ...


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


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Most products you purchase will have the information on the label. If no information is provided you can look for a marking similar to the following that will help you identify the type of plastic it was made with. ABS does not have a symbol, but is often marked >ABS<. In your case, I'd look around the base of the hose reel you should be able to find ...


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No glue needed. the angle of the cleat and gravity does to trick. It will not need it but you can run a screw into the framing to solve any issue you may have.


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The easy thing to do would be Liquid Nails and I am pretty sure they have a stone version. A better solution would be some thinset. I do not agree with silicone because it has a little give in it. After a while of kicking or stepping on it will lose its grip a bit and eventually come loose.


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It's probably not going to be as simple as "tighten up the bolts" - mysteriously unscrewing themselves is a low likelihood .vs. "there's some deterioration in the wall where they attach" which will need to be addressed. Or "Someone sat on the sink and stressed them/the wood they were attached to." So, the sink probably needs to come off to effect a lasting ...


2

Do you need the fire resistance and sound-deadening of drywall, or just want the look? You might consider something else that would look quite similar but not have the weight. I put textured paintable wallpaper over wood paneling, like this textured wallpaper. Once painted, it blended right in with the drywalled wall next to it. Nobody knows it isn't ...


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Yes, you can paint plasterboard directly - it's usually just paper on the outside. (Moisture resisting plasterboard tends to have a foil on on side though, which probably won't take paint well). What paint you use will depend what finish (or colours) you want, but you're unlikely to have problems using either emulsion or undercoat and gloss (or matt or ...


2

There is no Do-It-Yourself asbestos abatement process that meets US construction industry standards for safety and the protection of air quality. The only proper methods for renovating structures containing asbestos bearing building materials require removal and/or encapsulation by professionals experienced in the area. There is no silver bullet in a ...


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First, I agree with diceless, it is probably perfectly legal for the homeowner, to deal with this problem himself (assuming no part of the house is rented to a third party). On the other hand, I agree with Mazura, you may be opening a huge can of worms here. Since we are only talking about 2 bedrooms, I have to question the cost and time effectiveness of ...


2

You don't remove it. The silicone is probably just to secure the pipe to the wall - so it doesn't wiggle or so that air doesn't get in. If you need access to the pipe I would cut the white pipe. This would allow you to fully snake anything below. Chances are pretty high that all of these pipes are glued very well together. They are not meant to wiggle ...


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Sure you can. It will be a better water deterrent than painted sheetrock and will certainly be easier to maintain and clean. Is it recommended? Probably not. But not everything has to be approved. I would adhere Formica with the same mastic for applying vinyl tile. It is easy to apply and work, and has more than adequate adhesion.


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I typically use Goo Gone (US product), will remove most. Rubbing Alcohol is another item that works for some adhesive. Or clorox wipes also works on some.


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The common 2 part epoxies from the hardware store or home center are NOT waterproof. I learned this the hard way using them on boat projects. If you are going to use epoxy, it's worth the few extra bucks for a good one, like WEST System. You will probably also want some fillers like colloidal silica or glass micro beads to control the viscosity and sag of ...


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I found this answer for you on this forum: Henkel/Loctite's Hysol series and 3M's Scotch-Weld epoxies are good choices. Surface preparation is critical. Review standards on this subject for best practices: ASTM D 2651 Standard Guide for Preparation of Metal Surfaces for Adhesive Bonding and ISO 17212 Structural adhesives -- Guidelines for the surface ...


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You could try running a putty knife or something behind them, but my actual advice for removing them is to have the spackle or drywall compound and paint handy, as scars are to be expected. Hmm - heat (as from a hair dryer - not so much as to scorch paint) might also help loosen the adhesive a bit. As for the left-behind adhesive the usual suspects - ...


1

I used stainless steel pipe clamps and that fixed the leaks. Next time I will order the appropriate metric pieces from the original vendor.


1

Carefully cut as much of the glue as possible with a utility knife. With a small pry bar, cats paw, or flat bar gently pry at the gap. If you can, cut some more glue while prying. you may also consider wedging a paint scraper,( not to be confused with a putty knife) in the gap, then hitting it with a hammer. At this point you have to weigh the risk of ...


1

What about velcroing through the screen, then sticking another piece on the back, basically making a velcro frame around the screen? This is hard to explain, here's a diagram: AAAAAAAAAA LLLLLLLLLL SSSSSSSSSS HHHHHHHHHH AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA LLLLLLLLLL HHHHHHHHHH AAAAAAAAAA FFFFFFFFFF The first 2 rows (AL) are one piece of velcro, loop side, with the ...


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I would recommend that you reuse the furring. Here is my reasoning It's already there. It will cost more to remove it than reuse it It will provide space to run electrical, network, phone, coax, etc wiring Unless you head height is really low, the 1.5" will not be missed too much. Essentially, you have a 'service cavity'. You can place low profile can ...


1

First, test the adhesive. If it does have asbestos, you are stuck. If it doesn't your life is going to be easy. Here is the reason why they recommend complete removal of the wood. Asbestos removal requires two things: Enveloping the entire area, basically making a sealed air tight work area that can be removed once work is done. This would be walls and ...


1

It is just black mortar. They sell mortar in many different colors along with powdered coloring you can add to make just about any color you want. Mortar is used between brick and block to seal the joint from the elements, and to lock the bricks together (among other things). In the picture above, it is not used to lock the bricks together or weatherproof ...


1

AFAIR, asbestos mastic is much more likely with tile (which may itself contain asbestos) - I would not expect it under carpet, other than as a remnant of a prior tile job (no sign of that here.) And, as you have noted, it doesn't look like it. While you could engage full paranoia (as the folks that make money from it like) and have it tested, you can ...


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I have used wax paper over surfaces to keep it clean. Used tape over the shafts of bar clamps, small pieces of cellophane between blocks of wood that was clamped in place to keep faces of planks aligned while edge gluing.


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Wood glue will peel right off of pretty much any type of poly sheeting. Depending on how large of a surface you need to cover and how much abuse it needs to withstand, you can use pretty much anything from painter's plastic to garbage bags.


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Use clear silicone caulk, super strong as an adhesive when cured and waterproof.


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Lighter fluid (the stuff you put in a Zippo lighter) has worked well for me and lots of tissue. Gaffer tape adhesive is thick and soon bungs up the cloth/tissue so I use centre feed rolls as it is durable enough.


1

I wouldn't trust glue unless it was certified to deal with the solar heating, humidity, etc. it will be subject to. There are industrial adhesives which would do it... but it's also going to be a pain to maintain that way. Have you considered just painting the aluminum panels? Or using screws of a size and type actually designed to carry weight when ...



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