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5

A good drywall adhesive has much more shear strength than screws - and this is just when your glue is on the framing. So if you are doubling up the drywall gluing makes a ton of sense. Just recently my drywall guys started using glue and I can say this, I hope I never have to demo these places because the drywall is ATTACHED. All this being said the ...


4

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


3

Most products you purchase will have the information on the label. If no information is provided you can look for a marking similar to the following that will help you identify the type of plastic it was made with. ABS does not have a symbol, but is often marked >ABS<. In your case, I'd look around the base of the hose reel you should be able to find ...


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


3

No glue needed. the angle of the cleat and gravity does to trick. It will not need it but you can run a screw into the framing to solve any issue you may have.


3

The easy thing to do would be Liquid Nails and I am pretty sure they have a stone version. A better solution would be some thinset. I do not agree with silicone because it has a little give in it. After a while of kicking or stepping on it will lose its grip a bit and eventually come loose.


3

Superglue works best when spread in a thin layer, a "blob" will take longer to harden because a thin skin forms on the surface, slowing the curing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate In general, cyanoacrylate is an acrylic resin that rapidly polymerises in the presence of water (specifically hydroxide ions), forming long, strong chains, ...


2

Do you need the fire resistance and sound-deadening of drywall, or just want the look? You might consider something else that would look quite similar but not have the weight. I put textured paintable wallpaper over wood paneling, like this textured wallpaper. Once painted, it blended right in with the drywalled wall next to it. Nobody knows it isn't ...


2

I checked with the Gorilla Glue website, and the only solvent for this glue is acetone. Be careful using acetone as it will strip many clear furniture finishes. The website also said that it may be necessary to allow the acetone to soak into the glue for awhile to soften it. Good luck!


2

I would first try a plastic scraping tool to see if you can physically remove it. This page from the manufactures site says: Wipe off excess glue immediately with a dry cloth or standard paint thinner. Do not drag glue over material, instead make small swipes to remove wet adhesive. Make sure you avoid skin contact. Cured glue can be removed with a ...


2

I typically use Goo Gone (US product), will remove most. Rubbing Alcohol is another item that works for some adhesive. Or clorox wipes also works on some.


2

The common 2 part epoxies from the hardware store or home center are NOT waterproof. I learned this the hard way using them on boat projects. If you are going to use epoxy, it's worth the few extra bucks for a good one, like WEST System. You will probably also want some fillers like colloidal silica or glass micro beads to control the viscosity and sag of ...


2

First, I agree with diceless, it is probably perfectly legal for the homeowner, to deal with this problem himself (assuming no part of the house is rented to a third party). On the other hand, I agree with Mazura, you may be opening a huge can of worms here. Since we are only talking about 2 bedrooms, I have to question the cost and time effectiveness of ...


2

There is no Do-It-Yourself asbestos abatement process that meets US construction industry standards for safety and the protection of air quality. The only proper methods for renovating structures containing asbestos bearing building materials require removal and/or encapsulation by professionals experienced in the area. There is no silver bullet in a ...


2

Yes, you can paint plasterboard directly - it's usually just paper on the outside. (Moisture resisting plasterboard tends to have a foil on on side though, which probably won't take paint well). What paint you use will depend what finish (or colours) you want, but you're unlikely to have problems using either emulsion or undercoat and gloss (or matt or ...


2

Sure you can. It will be a better water deterrent than painted sheetrock and will certainly be easier to maintain and clean. Is it recommended? Probably not. But not everything has to be approved. I would adhere Formica with the same mastic for applying vinyl tile. It is easy to apply and work, and has more than adequate adhesion.


2

You don't remove it. The silicone is probably just to secure the pipe to the wall - so it doesn't wiggle or so that air doesn't get in. If you need access to the pipe I would cut the white pipe. This would allow you to fully snake anything below. Chances are pretty high that all of these pipes are glued very well together. They are not meant to wiggle ...


1

It is just black mortar. They sell mortar in many different colors along with powdered coloring you can add to make just about any color you want. Mortar is used between brick and block to seal the joint from the elements, and to lock the bricks together (among other things). In the picture above, it is not used to lock the bricks together or weatherproof ...


1

AFAIR, asbestos mastic is much more likely with tile (which may itself contain asbestos) - I would not expect it under carpet, other than as a remnant of a prior tile job (no sign of that here.) And, as you have noted, it doesn't look like it. While you could engage full paranoia (as the folks that make money from it like) and have it tested, you can ...


1

First, test the adhesive. If it does have asbestos, you are stuck. If it doesn't your life is going to be easy. Here is the reason why they recommend complete removal of the wood. Asbestos removal requires two things: Enveloping the entire area, basically making a sealed air tight work area that can be removed once work is done. This would be walls and ...


1

I have used wax paper over surfaces to keep it clean. Used tape over the shafts of bar clamps, small pieces of cellophane between blocks of wood that was clamped in place to keep faces of planks aligned while edge gluing.


1

Wood glue will peel right off of pretty much any type of poly sheeting. Depending on how large of a surface you need to cover and how much abuse it needs to withstand, you can use pretty much anything from painter's plastic to garbage bags.


1

Use clear silicone caulk, super strong as an adhesive when cured and waterproof.


1

Lighter fluid (the stuff you put in a Zippo lighter) has worked well for me and lots of tissue. Gaffer tape adhesive is thick and soon bungs up the cloth/tissue so I use centre feed rolls as it is durable enough.


1

If you're joining two pieces of wood along the length of the grain, the glue bond can be stronger than the wood itself. Butt joints are the exact opposite. If you need to join two grain ends, you'll want to reinforce it with biscuits or dowels (or possibly something even fancier like dovetails). Without knowing what you're attempting to make, my suggestion ...


1

The right way: buy a bigger piece of wood. For very limited, low-stress uses, the biscuit joiner as mentioned by @Nathan might work well enough - as might a Tongue and groove joint, double-groove and spline joint, or lap joint. While a scarf joint (various types are available) is strong, with such short pieces of wood you probably don't have enough wood in ...


1

I wouldn't trust glue unless it was certified to deal with the solar heating, humidity, etc. it will be subject to. There are industrial adhesives which would do it... but it's also going to be a pain to maintain that way. Have you considered just painting the aluminum panels? Or using screws of a size and type actually designed to carry weight when ...


1

Gluing on structural straps is an iffy project for most materials. Have you considered pop rivets? The tool can cost less than $10 and the rivets a few dollars more. You just drill a small hole throught he plastic, punch a small hole through the strapping, insert the rivet through the holes, add a washer on the webbing side and operate the tool. You ...


1

That level of glop is not normal. Some things to check: Is the pipe end deburred? A file plus sandpaper to finish works well. Are the pipe & fittings dry? Water can do strange things to PVC cement. Be firm, but don't push too hard, and don't over rotate. 1/8 of a rotation is enough. Work quickly, but do let any residual drips in the primer ...



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