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16

Why do the bulbs buzz when dimmed? When you pass AC current through the filament of an incandescent bulb, it produces a magnetic field. This magnetic field tends to push against itself, so there's some mechanical force acting on the filament itself which causes it to vibrate slightly. When running at full power, the AC is fairly close to a sine wave ...


7

Vermiculite on its own poses no health risk, and can be removed without concern. However, in many cases, mined vermiculite can contain traces of Asbestos, and so its removal is not recommended without an asbestos test. I would, as Scott suggests, call the testing company, and make sure that since no asbestos fibers were found, this indicates that the ...


6

I've used standard-base chandelier bulbs in the past to solve this problem, like this: Their filament is longer and floppier than the one in a standard bulb, so the vibrations mentioned by Niall C. don't make any noticeable noise. Of course they look different than a standard bulb so they might not be applicable in your fixture. In ours they ...


5

No, not by itself. You're dealing with a spectrum of sound, cork will only partially absorb a portion of the spectrum. It will certainly improve things, depending on the existing wall surface. Also, don't forget the ceiling contributes more to reverberation than the floor. Absorbent materials is one way to control reverberation. Another is altering the ...


5

If sound proofing is your primary concern then you should build the walls all the way up to the roof, past the suspended ceiling. You should insulate the walls with sound-dampening insulation. If you are willing to spend more money and time, you should look into isolating channels that the drywall attaches to. This prevents sound from being carried through ...


5

The quality of speakers in your TV are quite limited because flat-screen TV's don't have enough room for proper speaker cabinets. As other answers suggest, the already reduced-quality sound is bouncing off the wall, which further reduces the quality by creating an echo. Definitely invest in some forward-facing speakers at a minimum. You may not have the ...


3

With newer, flat-screen TVs, there isn't much room for speakers. As a result, the sound from the build-in speakers is generally pretty poor - a very limited range, with no lows and limited highs. I believe that the problem is not directly due to room acoustics, but rather due to the quality of the sound coming from the TV. Even an inexpensive speaker bar, ...


3

Debuzzing coils seem to start at 11 millihenries (See this example) -- which is only about 4 ohms of inductive reactance at 60 hertz. For 300W bulbs, you want an inductor that can handle at least 3 amps, the higher the inductance the better. Beware, also, of insulation quality and heat tolerance. I show that Digikey carries some possible candidates ...


2

In general this is valid. I've done industrial networking, and this design is pretty prevalent. What I'm not sure about it where you are putting the "glass wool" insulation? Are you insulating the unfinished walls above the ceiling? Or were you putting the insulation flat on top of the acoustic tile? It the latter, then it is imperative that it be kept ...


2

I'd recommend calling the company who did the testing and ask them for clarification. I'm not sure if the Vermiculite itself poses any health hazards. I did read that it's non-toxic but I'm not sure what happens when you disturb it to remove it. I think in this case it's probably best to ask the professionals.


1

Given the previous issues listed with the other answer: Get one of these style boxes. Open the drywall up enough that you can put a 1' 2x4 behind the wall. Mount the 2x4 to the drywall with a drywall screw placed every 3" along that 2x4. The first 2x4 should be completely covered by the edge of the drywall. Take a SECOND length of drywall and mount it ...


1

If you're only going with one or the other, my personal opinion would be to go with accoustical drywall and seal the perimiter with accoustical caulk. Insulation goes between the studs, so you could still have vibrations traveling through the studs themselves and the top and bottom of the wall's frame. If you use sound-deadening drywall like QuietRock or ...


1

AFAIK, the insulation in the ceiling is to prevent sound traveling through the floor above. It's not intended to necessarily reduce the sound within the room itself (though it will, to an extent, as it'll be a softer material than concrete or wood and the surface texture will help dissipate sound).



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