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9

A subpanel is probably the safest bet. It will allow easier access to cut power in an emergency, and it will offer better protection of the wiring. If you go with option 1, you'll have to step down to #12 or #14 wire at some point to feed 120V receptacles. Which means you'll potentially be able to draw 30 amps on a #12/#14 wire, before the breaker trips. ...


8

I think for what you want to do: temporary short term solution you guarantee you will never operate both the dryer and welder at the same time You could consider building a 220V 30A power strip. Without knowing your welder, I'll list parts from Home Depot that might work but you have to confirm their suitability for your use. Please review this URL ...


6

I'm not in the US, so I used Google to deduce which prong is doing what in this outlet. I'll assume that the left and the right wires are phase wires and the middle wire is the ground. Note that although the left wire looks melted the right one looks just fine although they usually carry equal currents. So this is not melting due to overload. The most ...


6

I will echo TomG's sentiment: Yikes! By using the BX as the "neutral/ground" (really it's just the neutral; a three-prong 220v plug is considered ungrounded regardless of the continuity that should exist between neutral and ground), whenever the A/C is on, the armor of the cable is energized. It will have a lower voltage than the "hot" because the A/C is ...


5

The calculator you referenced is only appropriate for voltage drop and makes the disclaimer that the results of the calculation do not account for current specs or NEC. Any circuit fused for 30 amps must use a minimum of 10 ga copper or 8 ga alu. Longer runs may require an upgrade of wire size. In your case, use at least 10 copper for your welder regardless ...


5

Yikes! I am not an electrician, but I would run new 10/3 BX. Your jury-rigged system might work, but it has the capacity to electrocute someone, or maybe start a fire, if anything goes wrong. Possible issues include the BX armor being hot if a fault somehow occurs where it's connected to the neutral bus or overloading one of the hot wires if one of ...


4

Both of the previous answers are completely accurate. New ranges all come with the new four wire plug, however you can convert to a three wire configuration if your box is grounded (in this case your's is) by connecting the ground lug to the box in the female plug. Although this would not meet current code requirements, it is perfectly safe and this three ...


3

At first I was not sure what you meant. Basically you only want to use one or the other without plugging in and out. Simple answer is No. Not for home applications.. maybe some commercial or heavy industry ones.. but the plugs are different. Not so simple answer.. You can make one :-) You will need a highly rated rotary switch like this one ...


2

You can't step down 220 volts by using two live wires - that voltage is between phase and neutral and the voltage between phases will be 380 volts, so no cheap 220 volts is there. Note that besides different voltages there's 50 Hz versus 60 Hz issue - your country likely has 50 Hz mains and if you use an ordinary (not switching power supply) transformer it ...


2

It looks like there is a little rust on the screw for the black wire. This would have increased the resistance for that leg. More resistance means there is more heat generated. The heat would have caused expansion, which could increase the resistance further. An electrician would, at the very least, cut off the damaged insulation, and replace the ...


1

You might check and see if the wire is in conduit. If so, take all doubt away and fish a ground wire through it. If it metal conduit and no ground that means more places for the ground to fail, like if a connector is not tightened or corrosion. If you can run a ground run the ground. Latest code asks for these to be 4 wires now. If an electrician is ...


1

What it looks like to me is that the insulation looks over-heated and the insulation is bubbling and failing. Also the insulation is cracking. Bubbling is from overheating, like too many amps being pulled through the romex, and the breaker did not trip, which it should because it is thermally protected. Thru the picture it is hard t tell but if you see ...


1

Simple "line voltage" T stat wiring. One wire is L1 (120V potential) from source, one wire is L2(120v potential)source connected to heating strips, then the switch, then L1 source. When the switch closes the 240V circuit is completed. If you have 240V when checking both wires together, and only two wires on switch, there is something wrong with the new fancy ...



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