Take the 2-minute tour ×
Home Improvement Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for contractors and serious DIYers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a large thatched barn recently (6 months) laid with a concrete floor to replace the original mud floor. The concrete was dusting badly, especially near where a table tennis table sits, so I have now treated it with two coats of diluted (1:5) pva.

My question is whether the addition of floor paint (at some considerable expense and effort) is going to serve any useful purpose or whether it is purely aesthetic. The surface is currently quite rough so I do not need to add any anti-slip coating. All I need is a durable surface that will not powder.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I would have said one reason for painting would be to create a stable surface, but you seem to have that covered by your use of PVA.

The main reasons for painting (that I can think of right now are):

  • Aesthetics (as you've mentioned), it will tone down the "industrial" nature of concrete flooring and match your colour scheme.
  • Durability, this covers physical damage such as scuffing etc.
  • Maintainance, it will be easier to clean up spills etc. from a painted floor and you won't get water stains etc. either.

So you've covered 2 out of the 3 I can think of, though a couple of coats of the appropriate floor paint might be more durable than the PVA. The question then becomes do you need to take care of the 3rd point?

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, a good coat or two of floor enamel will prevent stains and make clean up a lot easier. –  shirlock homes Aug 3 '11 at 10:52
    
Using a latex paint would probably work better for concreate floors. It will give you a much better seal, and it will make cleanup much easier for spills. –  lazoDev Aug 3 '11 at 12:48
    
Latex primer, yes, but a floor enamel or epoxy would be the right product to use here. Latex will wash away if you scrub it hard. –  Karl Katzke Aug 4 '11 at 12:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.