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I had a pool installed a few years ago and the builder threw in a narrow concrete patio around it. See fuzzy picture below (sorry about that. Google earth must be a little tipsy tonight).

So now that I've paid off the pool, I'm thinking of putting down a flagstone patio, but the trick is that I want to extend it beyond the paltry concrete patio that already exists (dotted square around pool).

I assume it will be a pretty easy job to lay down the stone on top of a nice level concrete patio, but I am a little concerned about how to make the transition between the concrete part and the grass part.

(1) Is this even advisable, or should I just extend the concrete out to the entire area I want for the patio before laying stone (adding considerable cost)?

(2) Assuming I don't extend the concrete, what should I do when the stone transitions from the concrete subsurface to the dirt? I'm nervous that cracks will occur over time, and I'd like to do whatever I can to avoid that.

Pool Photo

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did the pics come from a brownie on the space station? lololol –  shirlock homes Aug 1 '11 at 22:05
    
Google Earth just doesn't have very good resolution at my location. That's all. –  JohnFx Aug 2 '11 at 4:16
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(1) Is this even advisable, or should I just extend the concrete out to the entire area I want for the patio before laying stone (adding considerable cost)?

Rolls-Royce job (Money no object): Extend the concrete slab out to the area you wish to pave or remove the existing slab and start allover again.

(2) Assuming I don't extend the concrete, what should I do when the stone transitions from the concrete subsurface to the dirt? I'm nervous that cracks will occur over time, and I'd like to do whatever I can to avoid that.

Good enough job (and what most paving pro's would do, at least the ones I know back in the UK): Excavate 6 to 8 inches (150 to 200mm) from the area you want to extend into. Back fill that area with sub-base (crushed rock) material. Back fill in 2 to 3 inch (50 to 75mm) layers, each layer should be "properly" compacted. This will give you a sub-base that is "nearly" as good/stable as the existing concrete slab.

  • Something to consider, regardless of chosen method, how is the paving area going to drain? Do you need to put in some sort of drainage system , thus preventing the surrounding softscape from flooding due to the new hardscape?
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you can dig a foundation square where your dotted line is. atleast 15CM wide and 10cm foundation. You dont need to put a concrete slab on the whole thing. The trick is to cemeent the last slabs to the foundation. at an angle so that the grass/ground go. Like inside the blue lines.

enter image description here

This is not a brilliant autocad picture but it illustrates how to end your tiles. The red is cement/adhesive to the foundation. The length of the foundation should be atleast 1 tile flat. The poles in the ground are optional. If you have clayish ground you should use those and about 1 metre long. If you have topsoilish sand that does not tend to move due to moisture then dont worry about it. The squigly line is the natural grass/ground level and the straight brown area is hard/compacted not dug ground. Obvoisly the picture is not brilliant but you need sand under your tiles that i missed out. where on the concrete the adhevsive/cement will make up the height for the sand layer!

I hope this makes sense - I have done many paved areas like this and its a great long lasting solution.

enter image description here

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