Take the 2-minute tour ×
Home Improvement Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for contractors and serious DIYers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've discovered that rats/mice are living in my home. At night they come into my study and chew any books they can find, so I had planned to exterminate them by placing rat poison in the study. However, I'm worried that they could eat it and die in my study somewhere that I can't find them. What are the steps to take or alternative extermination methods?

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate: diy.stackexchange.com/questions/3205/theres-a-mouse-in-my-house –  Doresoom Feb 25 '11 at 14:27
2  
@Doresoom : I'd say that they're related, but there might be other protection methods that aren't about extermination. –  Joe Feb 25 '11 at 14:49
    
@Joe: Good point, maybe I was too hasty with the close hammer. –  Doresoom Feb 25 '11 at 15:09
1  
It'll probably be cheaper to set a few traps. They don't cost much (especially in comparison to a bookshelf), stay pretty much where you put them, and solve the rodent problem. Even if you're completely against killing them, there are humane live-traps available, still cheaper than a bookshelf. Unless you like having mice/rats in your house, I'd say getting rid of them is the best course of action. –  Doresoom Feb 25 '11 at 15:42
1  
@Tester101 : even if there weren't non-extermination options, it's not an exact duplicate, because this one specifically called for not leaving bodies in random places; that means poison and cats are generally out. –  Joe Feb 25 '11 at 18:13
show 5 more comments

2 Answers 2

From a book protection, and not extermination standpoint, you could always build shelving that had doors on it -- like the ones used in law libraries, where a door drops down from the top to close things up.

(typically, they're glass or other clear doors, so you can see what's in there easily.)

share|improve this answer
    
Up-voted, Because aveSome Idea, but i m staying in a Rent Home, I need the Book Protection methods rather than Killing the rats –  Sankar Ganesh Feb 25 '11 at 15:01
1  
A glass-doored freestanding bookshelf would be a good option if you can't attach shelving to the walls in a rental property. –  Doresoom Feb 25 '11 at 15:10
    
@Doresoom: i m living in a Rent House, that's not my own house, also the owner will not give any money for effort , so i m looking for some cheapest kind of mechanism which help my books to protect from rats, even-though i had shifted to some other rent home, there also i can reuse this mechanism. –  Sankar Ganesh Feb 25 '11 at 15:14
1  
Depending on the determination of the mice, a shelf built from wood would only slow them down. The shelves should be built from something mice cannot chew through, and also be almost completely sealed (as mice can slip through the tiniest cracks). –  Tester101 Feb 25 '11 at 15:58
    
I had a situation where mice had chewed into a cabinet and then out through the back and had then chewed out the plaster to make a void and were living there between the back of the cabinet and the wall. –  flamingpenguin Feb 25 '11 at 16:09
add comment

I would think the mice/rats are not chewing on the books as a source of food (unless they really want lots of fiber in their diets), rather they are most likely gathering nesting material. As such, you may be able to prevent them from chewing your books by providing them another source of nesting material.

Try placing a few rolls of toilet tissue on the book shelf, and see if the rodents prefer that over the books. If that doesn't work you might also try some other materials, like cardboard, or other paper products like spare printer paper.

Ultimately the solution here is to eliminate the pest problem, there are some good suggestions on how to do that in this question "Theres a mouse in my house".

share|improve this answer
    
I have kept pet fancy rats for some time, and from my observations they sometimes also chew things to see if there is anything inside them worth eating. It seems to me that they simply do not realise that books are paper all the way through until they have chewed a few. –  flamingpenguin Feb 25 '11 at 16:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.