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In our rental property, the kitchen walls are all ever so slightly curved (as are a lot of walls in our house)

We want to put up a knife magnet. Obviously we are keen for this not to be wobbly in any way as this could lead to the blades falling, not good. Any tips on the best way to achieve this, ruling out re-plastering the room.

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Given that you are not even allowed to drill a hole in the wall of most rental property, how would you fix it up even with the walls were true? –  Walker Feb 7 '11 at 11:53
    
Most, but not mine –  Mild Fuzz Feb 7 '11 at 11:58
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Which direction is the wall bending? Does it form a concave (the sides are closer then the center) or convex form (the center is closer then the sides)? The answer to this question has an impact on the answer. Also, how are the mounting holes on the magnet arranged? In the center, or on the sides? –  trip0d199 Feb 7 '11 at 13:34
    
convex shape, the magnet is a solid strip through the horizontal plane of the wood. –  Mild Fuzz Feb 7 '11 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

Maybe you can fix some adhesive felt pads ( like you would use under furniture legs) to the back outside edges of your rack to compensate for the curve. These would act like wedges to bridge the bow and not scratch the plaster wall.

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If the curve isn't too bad (sounds like it isn't) some stick on rubber feet might help. They will keep the knife bar off the wall, and compress enough to give you some play on how the bar hangs on the wall.

Good luck

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You could use washers or some other variable width spacers to hold the knife board slightly away from the wall.

My fear with using felt or other soft material, is that it will compress over time causing the board to become loose. So I would use something more rigid, like metal washers.

When you hang the board put the mounting screws/bolts through the board, then the spacers, and then into the wall. You will end up with a gap between the wall and the board in spots, but the board should be solid and you won't have to worry about it dropping knives. enter image description here

A more difficult solution would be to "hollow" out the back side of the board using either sand paper or a saw, to fit the contour of the wall. This would allow the board to fit snuggly against the wall, but has the down side of extra work, and requires that there is enough wood behind the magnet to allow the proper curve to be formed.

enter image description here

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