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My 1955 house has a 25 foot drain run from my kitchen to my main stack (~7 feet of bends, then ~18 feet straight along a back wall).
It has clogged several times in various places, and I have had it professionally snaked as well as doing it myself.
The clogs are mainly grease - the only solids are the food bits that make it through the sink strainer. I don't have a garbage disposal, and I've been told I shouldn't install one in this kitchen due to the drain.
The drain tech said that we could just expect to have it snaked once a year or so - his best recommendation was an enzyme product to digest the sludge in the pipes.

I'm hoping I can do better than drain cleaner products by installing a grease trap to intercept most of it before it settles in my pipes. From what I've read, grease traps are common in the commercial​/​industrial​/​restaurant sector, but they seem to be rarely used in homes.

Is this a good idea for my kitchen? What are the criteria for installing a grease trap?
Besides the under-sink space and periodic cleaning, what are the drawbacks?

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1 Answer 1

I would just use an enzyme once a week or once a month. Buying a case of that stuff will be less expensive than making enough space under your sink and installing a (stinky, smelly, disgusting) grease trap.

And the enzyme stuff is not made up of harsh chemicals.

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It sounds like the main drawback is the odor, then? –  mskfisher Jun 2 at 16:46
    
And cleaning it out. I'd rather pour some stuff down the drain then clean out a grease trap. Wouldn't you? –  longneck Jun 2 at 16:47
    
I've never cleaned one out, so it's hard to say. :) The diagrams make it look like you open the trap and scoop the accumulated fat off the top of the standing water. –  mskfisher Jun 2 at 19:15
    
We did buy some enzyme cleaner, but it is so heavily scented that it deters us from using it. We'd need to find an unscented variety. –  mskfisher Jun 2 at 19:16

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