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I would like to add a new cable outlet to an outside wall and wanted to find out what kind of drill bit is needed to drill through and feed the coax cable as well as anything else to be mindful of. Comcast wanted $70 for a new outlet installation ($30 install, $40 tech visit), so I figured I could do it myself. The part that I'm most unfamiliar with is how to properly weather seal it. The outside just has vinyl siding and there's no electrical outlets nearby.

So far, I think I need the following

  1. Coax Cable
  2. Coax Cable Wall Plate
  3. Long drill bit
  4. Add a 3-way Cable Splitter to cable box
  5. Weather sealer?

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Typically the connectors are added after the wire is pulled that way a wall insert is put in place and sealed. Are you planning on doing the same or will the connectors already be installed? –  Jack May 22 at 0:58
    
@Jack The connectors on one end will be in place; just the end that will be fed into the house to make sure I have a tight drill hole. –  Kermit May 22 at 16:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'd drill from the inside out.

Preparation inside

Cut a hole in the drywall where you want the terminal. Cut the hole so that a "low voltage" bracket will fit.

enter image description here

Drilling the hole

If it's a 2×4 stud wall, your bit will only have to be ~5" long. Drill a hole in about the center of the drywall cut out. You can use a 3/8" installer bit, which is ~20" long and has a hole on the end to aid in pulling the cable.

  1. Drill through the wall with the installer bit.
  2. Remove the bit from the drill (leaving it in the hole).
  3. Go outside and (or have a helper) connect the cable to the end of the installer bit.
  4. Back inside, pull the bit and cable back through the hole.

3/8" Installer Bit

Connecting the cable

Fish the wire from the outside junction, through the newly drilled hole (if you haven't already). Add ends to the cable, and connect the end at the junction box outside. Connect the other end to a faceplate of your choosing, and mount the faceplate to the "low voltage" bracket.

F-Type ConnectorFaceplate

Weatherproofing

Finish by sealing around the cable, where it enters the wall. Use either silicone sealant, or duct seal

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3  
On the outside, be sure to include a drip loop, where the cable turns down as it exits the wall so that it doesn't lead water in. –  TomG May 22 at 3:23
    
@TomG A drip loop is only required if the cable slopes toward the hole in the wall. If the cable comes out of the wall and immediately goes vertically down, or slopes downward away from the hole. No drip loop is needed, since water does not flow uphill. –  Tester101 May 22 at 11:35
1  
Thanks, I should have qualified 'if the cable doesn't go down when it exits, be sure to include a drip loop' –  TomG May 22 at 13:56
    
Comcast's techs use caulk rather than silicone. It's just as effective. There are also plastic gaskets you can get for this purpose: summitsource.com/… –  Thomas May 22 at 15:29
1  
@Thomas You mean they use latex caulk instead of silicone caulk? If so, they're doing it wrong. Latex caulk becomes brittle when exposed to sunlight, and so is not good for outdoor use. –  Tester101 May 22 at 15:45

After following Tester101's answer, here is a detailed step-by-step with pictures of how I fed the cable.

Shopping list

Sub-total $27.99

You may also need:

  • RG6 cable (if you don't have any lying around it's $0.29/foot at Home Depot)
  • 3-way cable splitter $6.97

Tools required

  • Drill
  • Universal Cable Jacket Stripper $4.88
  • Dry-wall saw (or something for cutting a hole into the drywall)

Prep work

I used some brown packaging paper, cut a piece out for the corner and taped it using painter's tape in the area that will be worked on

On the outside, the cable will go into the cable box which is conveniently located about 2 feet away.

Step 1

I picked a spot that was in between the door frame and opposite wall to start drilling, about a foot above the ground.

Comes out clean on the outside. You'll want to leave the bit sticking out so you can feed the coax back inside.

Step 2

I took some existing cable and cut one of the ends, exposing the inside wire for better handling when feeding it back through the wall.

Step 3

I fed through the exposed end of the coax from the inside of the cable box so that the end with a connector can be added to the splitter.

At this point, you may need to add the 3-way splitter if you don't want to replace an existing connection.

Step 4

Before we feed the coax cable back inside, slide the plastic bushing onto the coax cable.

It's time to tape the cable to the bit to feed back inside.

Step 5

Using electrical tape, tape the coax cable to the bit.

Pull the drill bit back thus pulling the cable through the wall.

Step 6

Press the plastic bushing into the outside wall. You may need to enlarge the hole slightly to push through the bushing.

Step 7

Cut the drywall and fasten the low voltage bracket.

Step 8

Strip the coax cable and fold the wire shielding against the outer insulation.

Push the connector onto the coax cable and twist the connector until the connector is firmly sealed with approximately 1/8" of center conductor protruding from the connector.

Step 9

Connect the coax to the back of the wall plate.

Step 10

Secure the wall plate to the bracket.

Step 11

Using a screw driver, I bent the coax to ensure it bends down as it enters the plastic bushing. I then used the silicone around the bushing as well as around the coax.

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You should follow the manufacturers minimum bend radius, to insure you don't damage the cable. Bending it with a screwdriver, is probably not the best idea. –  Tester101 Aug 7 at 16:19
    
@Tester101 That's a much better approach. –  Kermit Aug 7 at 16:24

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