Take the 2-minute tour ×
Home Improvement Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for contractors and serious DIYers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We are in the midst of a kitchen remodel and yesterday had someone come and run a new gas line as we are making the switch from an electric to a gas range. This fellow is a well rated pro but I'm concerned that the way he's cut the studs (see photos) has structurally compromised them. Maybe the cleats he's put in place are enough to offset that?

Detail of the cut in the stud Image of full gas line in kitchen

share|improve this question
    
Sometimes the gas guy doesn't care about the structure. Is it a load bearing wall? Also can you make the second question a new question? –  DMoore May 20 at 16:00
    
It's an internal wall that essentially frames out the hallway behind the kitchen. Beyond that I'm not certain how to discern if it's load bearing. –  CraigPDX May 20 at 16:29
    
Second question separated into new question.[1]: diy.stackexchange.com/questions/42130/… –  CraigPDX May 20 at 16:35
1  
This answer might be useful. –  Tester101 May 20 at 17:15
    
@DMoore The gas guy better care about the structure. Otherwise he could loose his license, get sued, and/or have a house fall on him. –  Tester101 May 20 at 17:17
show 3 more comments

1 Answer 1

You are allowed to notch a non-load-bearing stud up to 40% of the width. For load bearing and exterior walls they can be notched to 25% of the stud width.

https://engineering.purdue.edu/~jliu/courses/CE479/extras/Notching_&_Boring_Guide_A11.pdf

share|improve this answer
    
It is an internal wall, but I'm not certain I can discern between load bearing and not. –  CraigPDX May 20 at 16:21
    
Are the metal cleats he put in adding stability in any way? –  CraigPDX May 20 at 16:22
1  
Probably some but if they are overnotched I don't know if the cleats are considered a code-approved method of reinforcement. You might need to talk to your local inspector to see what is acceptable. One of these products might be acceptable: strongtie.com/ftp/fliers/F-REPRPROTECT09.pdf –  Shane Wealti May 20 at 16:25
3  
The metal plates protect the pipe from penetration from screws/nails (think drywall installation). If they add any structural value, that's not their intended purpose. –  Tester101 May 20 at 16:32
    
@ShaneWealti The Stong-Tie stud shoes are a great suggestion. I may put those in for piece of mind. –  CraigPDX May 20 at 18:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.