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Not my garage, asking for a relative. Garage was previously painted with a 2 part epoxy floor paint. Shortly after painting something spilled and pooled around the tires and ate away the paint. Plus there are a couple other slight imperfections like peeling paint.

What would you do in this situation? Can you use the same type of 2 part epoxy paint over the existing paint?

Would you repaint the whole floor or do you think the colors will still match?

Do you know if they make repair kits?

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I chose boring latex concrete floor paint precisely due to researching other options and finding that re-coating and repair was often a pain with epoxy products - not to mention the cost differential. Latex you can just slap more on and it will stick. If there is "peeling" as well as damage the common recommendation is to take it back to bare concrete (I think grinding is a typical method) and acid etch it before a do-over. You know what I'd suggest for doing over if they go that way... –  Ecnerwal May 8 at 3:12
    
@Ecnerwal can you point me to any references to problems with coating epoxy over epoxy? I've been looking with no luck on the subject. Peeling is very minimal. Other than the tire spots there's maybe 2 or 3 quarter sized spots that are peeling. I'm not sure if the plan is to redo the whole floor from scratch. I hope not. There were no texture chips applied to the epoxy if that makes a difference. –  OrganicLawnDIY May 8 at 4:16

1 Answer 1

I called up Rustoleum to ask about their EpoxyShield product since that's what was used previously.

They informed me that the epoxy coating needs to be reapplied every 3-5 years (which is about how old the current coating is.)

Recommendation was to scuff sand existing epoxy coating with 60 grit sand paper over the entire surface to aid with adhesion, clean, allow to dry and recoat.

Basically, just treat it like painting over any other type of glossy paint.

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