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My beloved bedside lamp fell down, on the carpet, so it wasn't a big hit, and stopped working. Now, I tried to replace the bulb, but it doesn't change anything. Since this had happened to me another time in the recent past, I thought it would be useful to ask here a few things:

What is the best way to make my lamp re-usable not spending more than the cost of a new lamp?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Tester101 Dec 19 '13 at 12:34

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
A photo would be helpful. We'd also need to know if the switch no longer has power. Product recommendations are OT, which would include requests for a website or forum. Any suggestion would quickly get out of date, and the question invites spammers. –  BMitch Dec 17 '13 at 18:56
    
Many lamps use a standard lamp socket that is readily replaced. If the cord is old, you may as well replace it at the same time since the insulation can harden and crack with age. –  Johnny Dec 17 '13 at 20:26
    
It's nearly impossible to troubleshoot and repair a lamp through the internet. Without more detail about the lamp, and what damage it's taken (photos are always helpful), it's difficult to answer the question. –  Tester101 Dec 19 '13 at 12:36

1 Answer 1

Lamp repair is very sensitive to the value of the lamp to you - buying a new lamp or a new-to-you used lamp can often be cheaper than new repair parts, much less assigning a value to your labor. Of course, some new lamps are junk quality brand-new, so...

One method that can work is to transfer parts from a yard sale/thrift-shop lamp, if you find one with the electrical parts in good shape but unloved and low priced for other reasons, like being terminally ugly.

Having been tearing the things apart and putting them together for decades, starting when I was a kid, I'm a lousy source for "how to websites" and I'll let someone who came to it later take a stab at that part.

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