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The first floor of my home has a small bathroom attached to the kitchen. Bathroom has(had) a pretty standard 2 door closet. I say standard because it's the cheap kind you buy at Home Depot that's ready to go. You just frame it and nail the entire jam/doors in place. Anyway, space is tight.. and I am changing this into an open faced storage area and moving a stackable washer/dryer into it.

I've removed the door/frame and need to know how much more I can safely remove. Is what I'm looking at just there to frame the door? I am 99.99 percent certain the rear wall of the closet is load bearing; the ceiling joists run perpendicular to the wall(s)

On the left, I'd like to take that down as close to the wall as possible. This is the side the washer/dryer will go.

enter image description here

bad image of the other side. enter image description here

the other side of the wall. enter image description here

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Possible duplicate Are there ways to determine if a wall is load bearing? –  BMitch Dec 30 '13 at 12:45
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Probably not load bearing. Looks like roof load is on closet back wall (is that an exterior wall)? To be doubly sure, I always go to attic and look to see if there's any roof trussing sitting on top of the wall you're removing. Measure downstairs for landmarks (for reference points) when you're up there. Good luck, demo is FUN!

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The rear closet wall is a shared wall with my living room. So it is interior. My bedroom runs the entire length of the house and is directly above the kitchen/bath/living space. The roof peak/truss/whatever (big giant thing that's probably 2x 2x12's 3 feet to the left of the rear closet wall, in the last picture. –  AaronJAnderson Oct 28 '13 at 1:42
    
Generally if there is no header its not load bearing. That big of span would need double 2x8+ header and it doesn't look like you had one. –  Justin K Oct 28 '13 at 2:21
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@JustinK: Be careful with this kind of conclusion. The load bearing beam can be above the wall section. –  wallyk Oct 28 '13 at 3:23
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