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I have a home-based business and recently moved to a house with a detached garage. I plan to remodel a part of the garage for my new workshop. I've been looking for lighting options in LED. I need to develop area-lighting over the workbench and desk. The ceiling is 60" above the workbench and 64" above the desk. At present, the ceiling is not sheet-rocked so I am able to run wiring and place fixtures where needed. I also need some close lighting, such as a Architect's adjustable lamp attached to the bench, wall, or a free-standing unit that can be directed toward detail work. In my past workshop, I had 3 CFL spots in recessed ceiling cans designed for incandescent spots over the bench and a 4-tube CFL on a flexible stand. I just found an online source for GU10 lights, but I don't know much about them. They are rated to work with 85-265V. Mine is 115V. Do these GU10 fixtures wire directly to 115V? My CFL spots were rated at 900lumens and they weren't as bright as Incand. spots, but were acceptable. I also recently saw an online source for 12x12" LED panels that looked like they might work. Any suggestions or expertise would be greatly appreciated.

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Your question is a little broad, but I will interpret it to be something like "Can I use LED lighting sources to illuminate my workbench and desk?"

Yes. While the purchase price of LEDs is still much higher than conventional bulbs or CFLs, the prices are dropping and you often can find sales. There are 75 watt led flood bulbs now available in the $20 range, such as these

led flood

They can be used in simple porcelain or plastic lamp sockets in a basement, garage or workroom.

There are also LED retrofit trim baffles for recessed lighting, in the 65+ watt range, such as these

led recessed

They are often on sale for less than $30.

GU10 units are also available, but they tend to be in lower wattages.

All of the above are designed for 110-120 volt systems.

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