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What kind of accessories are available for switching the downspouts to the other side of the cutter? I'm not as concerned about the downspouts themselves as much as the connection to the gutter. I'm assuming I'm going to need to patch the connection to the old location and then cut a new hole in the other side.

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2  
Other side or other end? What material, metal or vinyl? Rectangular or square downspouts? –  Fiasco Labs Aug 17 '13 at 19:24
    
Other end. Metal. Rectangular downspouts. –  Mike Cole Aug 17 '13 at 21:24
8  
Don't forget you'll also have to change the slope of the gutters. –  Tester101 Aug 17 '13 at 22:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You will need:

1 - Rivets or screws. I would recommend rivets for aluminum gutter

2 - An outlet for the new downspout, if you can't reuse the old one

3 - A piece of metal slightly bigger than the width of your downspout

4 - Aviation snips, if you currently don't own any

5 - Gutter sealer or solder bars

6 - A new downspout, if needed

7 - As tester101 mentioned, you might need to change the slope of the gutter.

Now, All gutters should be sloped, but, this is not always done and is not always that big of a deal if the gutters is not that long. However, if it is sloped already, then you will most definitely need to remove the hangers and change the slope from one side to the other.

Directions:

1 - Start by removing the old downspout, however attached it is. If soldered you will need a torch or a soldering iron. If not, rivets or screws are easy to remove.

2 - Remove the outlet.

3 - Patch the hole with a piece of sheet metal, copper aluminum or steel

4 - If copper, solder the patched metal for that you will also need an soldering iron. To solder the copper together you also need soldering fluid, or acid. A torch will heat the metal too much and you won't be able to solder it together. If aluminum or steel, rivet it together and seal it with gutter sealer.

5 - Adjust gutter slope if necessary

6 - Using the newly purchased or older outlet, cut the new hole for it on the other side of the gutter. Use the outlet as a jig. Place over the bottom side of the gutter, as it will be easier to cut the hole. Using a scratch all or sharpie, mark the outlet on the gutter. Make sure you mark the INSIDE of the outlet.

7 - Place new outlet. Example

8 - Solder it if copper, or rivet it and seal it if aluminum or steel.

9 - Attach the downspout.

This should be done at your own risk. There's a reason professionals do it daily.

Have fun!

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Thanks for the answer. I didn't take into account the slope when I dreamed up the idea, and I didn't realize patching the old outlet was such a process. It seems like something I wouldn't be able to pull of myself. –  Mike Cole Sep 23 '13 at 16:01
    
No problem. It's really not that hard, once you have done a few times, but it is also easy to get it wrong and then need to call a pro. You're best bet is to call a professional that should be able to do it quickly enough that it won't cost you a fortune, and you know it'll be done right. –  guisasso Sep 23 '13 at 16:04
    
Yep, that's what I'm leaning towards. Seems the epic expensive failure factor is high on this. –  Mike Cole Sep 23 '13 at 16:11
    
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