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If I plug a hairdryer or anything else into a outlet, I lose voltage in the whole house. If I plug the iron in, the stove surges. This is a nightmare. I can't run the fridge; I can't even get the TV to come on. This just happened all of a sudden.

Also I have backfeeding on multiple circuits. No breakers have tripped. On my main breaker I'm pulling 170V with nothing on. Also I can shut all circuits down and still loose voltage on that circuit.

What could be happening?

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Possibly an open neutral after the breaker panel, but hard to tell from this description. We need more detail, particularly what you mean by backfeeding and where you're measuring voltage in different situations. –  BMitch Aug 11 '13 at 10:59
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Are you in a country that has 230V electrical supply (you mention 170V and low-voltage)? –  Niall C. Aug 11 '13 at 13:33
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Sounds like an open neutral which can be very dangerous and/or damage a lot of your electronics. It might be best to contact a licensed electrician. You said "pulling 170V with nothing on" - voltage should always be near constant; it's the load (amps) which will change depending on what is drawing power. –  Steven Aug 11 '13 at 15:28
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Note: details like house age, wiring type, and a photo of your breaker panel would help in answering the question. –  Bryce Aug 12 '13 at 18:27
    
It could be a partially broken hot: something constricting the current in the hot side. The problem could be upstream from the house in the transformer "down the street". Maybe someone didn't call before they dug. Has there been any construction or digging in the neighborhood? –  Kaz Aug 13 '13 at 19:29

1 Answer 1

Very very dangerous. First, all your electrical equipment is at risk. Shut off the mains, call an electrician. Or wait a bit longer and call the fire brigade.

If you have a shared neutral, or multiwire branch circuit, the neutral could have broken. Or the house was miswired (see http://www.homeinspector.org/resources/journals/Multiwire-Branch-Circuits.pdf ). Or what should have been a double breaker flipped, leaving the other half hot.

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