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We recently moved a 5 year old washer to a new home, connecting hot to hot and cold to cold. After a wash cycle completes, the clothes are hot. I verified teh hose connections. By opening/closing the shutoff valves, I found that the washer pulls from both hot and cold regardless of the temperature settings.

How do I troubleshoot this? I'm worried about shrinking clothes and bleeding reds with unwanted hot water.

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It's the washing machine (some valve issue). If you don't use hot washes much then for now, just turn off the hot tap and supply it only with cold water. –  Matt Jul 10 '13 at 22:24

2 Answers 2

Sounds like a stuck hot water solenoid (stuck open) or a bad timer mechanism (its a giant multipole rotary switch driven by a timer.

The solenoid is easy to get to and test by carefully disconnecting wires, measuring resistance: low, ~1000 ohms, but not zero or infinite.

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Wouldn't a fill valve that was stuck open remain open, never shutting off the water? I helped diagnose a washer that had a fill valve that occasionally stuck open, once causing a flood. But in that scenario, the washer needs to call for hot and open the valve for it then to become stuck open. Some washers temper cold water with some amount of hot even on the "cold" cycle. I think this washer is one of those, and the temperature sensor has failed. –  Tim B Jul 11 '13 at 12:57

Some washers temper cold water with some amount of hot even on the "cold" cycle. I think this washer is one of those, and the temperature sensor has failed. Contrast this with an older washer I used to have, where "cold" meant it filled only from the cold water input, "hot" was from the hot, and "warm" simply mixed the two with no temperature measurement or other feedback. It just opened both valves until the fill level was reached.

As a temporary measure, I would turn off the hot water input. Then look at one of the many online appliance parts websites for your model, and see if there is a temperature sensor. Even if you wouldn't attempt this repair yourself, this will help confirm if there is a temp sensor, and roughly how much the part should cost.

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I believe this to be the case. In fact, this was my troubleshooting methods was to turn each line off and run the washer to see what happened. At some point, the washer tried pulling from the line that was off. Ultimately, I have settled for just barely turning on the "hot" line which seems to have regulated our wash loads. The sensor is a good idea, though. Thanks. –  swasheck Jul 11 '13 at 14:42

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