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I am looking for someone to clean up mold in my attic, and I have been advised to find someone who is licensed in the area of mold. I’ve checked HomeAdvisor and BBB, but it’s not clear to me who actually has a mold license for my state (Illinois) or if such a license even exists.

How do I go about finding out who, in Illinois, licenses such professionals or even what credentials to ask for? Are they licensed by City? State? County? Is there a registry?

As an aside, How do I find someone to do this work?

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You'd hire them like any contractor. Ideally via word of mouth and references. Barring that, you go with your gut. As for licensing, they SHOULD be licensed...check with your local government (start with the city building code folks) to see what licenses they should have. –  DA01 Jul 2 '13 at 22:03
    
Is your local city inspecting this? –  DMoore Jul 2 '13 at 23:44
    
@DMoore - no the city is/will not be inspecting. –  guest Jul 3 '13 at 10:51
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The Illinois DPH site related to mold, which does not specifically license remediation firms.. They also don't do inspections. They DO list several internet sites for contractors:

The Institute for Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification

and

Association of Specialists in Cleaning and Restoration

neither of which are specific to Illinois, but do allow zip code searches (I found IICRC friendlier)

A helpful site at the EPA for mold: In their Mold Cleanup section, they recommend that the remediation contractor follow their Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings outline (even though its your house, not a school).

It might be a pertinent question to ask: "Do you follow the EPA guidelines for remediation?".

A basic tool for your own use, a moisture gauge, will tell you if the area is ready for treatment: Wooden interior framing should be < 15% moisture content. One reasonably accurate meter (non-contact) is the Ryobi E49MM01.

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