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I'm installing a short fence to run from the side of my house to the external garage. It will run along a seam where my asphalt driveway meets my concrete patio. I'm fairly certain that the footers will have to be on the concrete side in order to keep the fence from sticking out of from the side of the house.

My question is, is there a good way to dig the holes into the patio without having to break up the entire slab and re-pour it? Also, once I've dug the holes, is there something special I need to do when I set the footers in concrete since the concrete will be joined with the exiting patio?

EDIT:

I just wanted to clarify. I'm installing a wooden fence because the rest of the yard already has a wooden fence that I'm trying to match so I'm trying to avoid using chain-link.

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You could surface mount an aluminum fence to the slab instead. –  Evil Elf Jun 27 '13 at 17:02
    
I should have clarified this. I'm trying to do this with a wooden fence because I'm matching some fencing from the rest of the yard so aluminum isn't an option here. –  Wesley Bland Jun 27 '13 at 17:49
    
How thick is the slab? –  bib Jun 27 '13 at 20:46
    
About 1.5". Maybe 2". –  Wesley Bland Jun 28 '13 at 12:06
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What you want is something like this:

enter image description here

Get some Red-Heads or other appropriate concrete bolt and fasten it down. Slip the 4x4 in and tighten it up.

Ideally, you should still have some posts properly embedded in the ground to help support the torque caused by someone leaning on the fence, but you can use these in between.

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That's probably a good solution for the interior posts. I think it's going to take 4 posts to do this job (one on each end and two in the middle around a gate). This would take care of the gate posts, but as you say, I'll still need some in the ground to properly support the fence. Also (and I have to double check this), the local laws may require that I actually put the posts in the ground. I think I remember seeing that when I looked at them before, but I'll have to check again to be sure. –  Wesley Bland Jun 27 '13 at 17:57
    
Can one end of the fence be attached to the house? There are issues with this, but it might be the only way. –  Chris Cudmore Jun 27 '13 at 18:01
    
I'd have to double check that they line up, but assuming the local inspectors don't have a problem with it, that's a possibility. –  Wesley Bland Jun 27 '13 at 18:02
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