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I'm planning to build a wall block mailbox with the wall blocks that are 3.75" X 7.5" X 11.25". I've worked out the plans that allow for a particular mailbox to fit nicely in a space. However, it occurred to me that the blocks directly above the mailbox will not be sitting on anything except the mailbox. I'm concerned that the wall blocks will just crush the mailbox over time. Is there some steel plate or something that can be used to span the distance above the mailbox that would be strong enough to support the weight of the blocks above it?

The X indicates where I'm concerned about it falling in.

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| |  X   | |
|_|      |_|
| |      | |
|_|_ ____|_|
|___|______|
|______|___|
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|______|___|
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are you using the dry fit mortarless type of block? –  mikes Apr 6 '13 at 18:50
    
I assume you want the support item to be minimally visible? From your diagram, 2 rows above box, correct? Will you be loose stacking the blocks(without mortar) ? –  HerrBag Apr 6 '13 at 18:52
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

It occurred to me that this project might benefit from a single piece stone cap and eliminate lintel altogether. You could incorporate a bit of slope and weather proof the structure. A stone supply house could fashion it out of limestone.

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More traditional lintel: This window drawing is pretty analogous to a mailbox opening:

You are probably building a double wythe wall, not a veneer, so an upside down 'T' is used

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Good answer. Could use the mailbox if it is solid metal as support too. –  DMoore Apr 13 '13 at 5:55
    
@David Moore agreed.. a medium bed mortar or deck mud (dryer and not as commpacted as the usual brick mortar) could form a self supporting arch. –  HerrBag Apr 13 '13 at 20:19
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