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I have some Z-wave light switches that I want to install; below is a link to the diagram for the light switches. Basically I can have all the wiring completed minus the neutral wire for the switch at the bottom of my steps. It will be harder for me to get the neutral from the light than run it in the basement. I have a junction box that is close (4ft compared to 100ft) but it's the living room circuit. Is there anything wrong with tying the light switch that needs the neutral to the living room neutral, based on the wiring is 12/2 and the breaker is the same amperage?

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Id like to add that the Hall lighting (Z-wave) is on the left side of the breaker and the Living room where I want to add the possible neutral is on the right side of the breaker –  Brian Miller Feb 24 '13 at 8:51
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No. See also: this question, and this question. If you're in the US, see National Electrical Code (NEC) 300.3(B) Conductors of the Same Circuit. All conductors of the same circuit and, where used, the grounded conductor and all equipment grounding conductors and bonding conductors shall be contained within the same raceway, auxiliary gutter, cable tray, cablebus assembly, trench, cable, or cord, unless otherwise permitted in accordance with 300.3(B)(1) through (B)(4). –  Tester101 Feb 24 '13 at 13:25
    
Is there anything wrong with me running a 100ft wire to the breaker box and hooking up the neutral with the other neutral that is on the same circut? Basically having 2 exit points for the neutral? –  Brian Miller Feb 25 '13 at 4:14
    
Yes, what is wrong is that it violates the NEC, as quoted by Tester101. Electrically, it is sound. But you are leaving an unused neutral wire just dangling there, since you found a more convenient return path. Neutral or not, a loose wire is a loose wire. –  Kaz Feb 25 '13 at 6:18
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@Tester101 your comment should be an answer. –  The Evil Greebo Feb 25 '13 at 13:47

1 Answer 1

No.

See also: this question, and this question.

If you're in the US, see National Electrical Code (NEC) 300.3(B).

National Electrical Code 2011

ARTICLE 300 Wiring Methods

300.3(B) Conductors of the Same Circuit. All conductors of the same circuit and, where used, the grounded conductor and all equipment grounding conductors and bonding conductors shall be contained within the same raceway, auxiliary gutter, cable tray, cablebus assembly, trench, cable, or cord, unless otherwise permitted in accordance with 300.3(B)(1) through (B)(4).

This other answer explains one reason why this code rule exists.

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