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My washing machine will get stuck right before the rinse cycle. The washing machine will be full of water. The way to "fix it" is to twist the knob right after the "rinse" line, find the sweet spot, and pull the knob out. It can take 10+ tries to find this sweet spot and seems to have no rhyme or reason.

I've read online that this might be a drainage problem, but I'm not sure that is the case here. I'm basing that off of the fact that allowing time to pass doesn't increase the likelihood of hitting the sweet spot.

Anything I can check? As the pictures show this is a Whirlpool Ultimate Care II

stucklocation brand

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8 Answers 8

This just happened to us today. Our top lid was a little bit warped, so the lid strike wasn't "latching", more like striking, the button at the top of the washer to signal that it was closed.

I figured it out after I replaced the drainage hose and realized that it didn't fix the problem. As I was getting frustrated, I used the screw driver that I had prepared for the hose replacement to push down on the little trap door/latch and sure enough, the washer kicked into the spin cycle. It makes sense now because every other step of the cycle can function with the top lid open, except for the spin cycle. Therefore, it's most likely that the lid isn't closing right. That was my case and now it makes perfect sense.

On a side note, the hose is supposed to be replaced every 5 years and this thing is at least 10 years old, so I'm justifying the pain I went through to replace the hose. Our washer is jammed next to our dryer in a tiny room and the water basin is broken, so getting to the back of the washer was a pain. If it was out in the open, it would have been an easy replacement. The hose was like $8 at Home Depot. Buy a clamp too if you need to replace the hose, fyi.

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If you can hear some noises during the stuck rinse cycle, then it would likely be that the clutch had worn. You need to replace the clutch assembly.

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It also could be as simple as the door safety switch.

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How would one go about checking that? –  Niall C. Nov 19 '14 at 3:14

My daughter in law had the same problem and it was that her dry well was full of lint from years of use. We installed a sump to the town sewer line instead.

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It's more than likely a clogged hose connecting to the water pump.From my experience,i disconnected and unclogged a washer and found that so much cardboard,coins and sediment had accumulated,clogging the water hose and pump.Sure enough the washer started to work as if nothing had happened,lol.

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It could simply be blocked. Put down loads of old towels and clear out the filter. It won't go on to rinse if it thinks that there's still water from the soap cycle. Other causes are broken pressure sensor, failing water inlet valve, dodgy door lock.

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Try to raise the exit hose on the backside so it levels to the top plate of the machine. If the hose is flat on the floor or in a low height the machine can have problems draining the water.

I don't mean the end of the hose here, but the "middle" of it (see arrow on my amazing figure). If the hose (in red) comes out at a lower point then make sure the bend is at a high point:

enter image description here

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Sounds like the timer-switch is dirty or worn, based on the fact there's a sweet spot that works. If the timer is stuck, i.e. it never reaches the end of the cycle on it's own, the gear teeth are probably worn in that spot.

If the timer works, it just 'misses' the rinse, you may be able to access the contacts and clean them. If the gears are worn or broken, you'll probably have to replace the whole assembly.

Since you can get it to work in the sweet spot, that rules out the usual suspects like control valves, relays, pumps.

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