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One of our bath walls is green Sheetrock with a white semi gloss paint finish. As you can see on the pictures attached, the paint has started to bubble and strip.

enter image description here paint stripping @ sealer enter image description here

What can we do now?

  1. shall/can we tile?

  2. can we keep a painted wall (our aesthetic preference) but using another primer and an exterior type paint? in that case what shall we use?

  3. are there any cement layers that could be added to the wall and that would allow us to have a white finish?

Wall behind tile and paint. enter image description here enter image description here

Found construction picture (shows what is behind the sheetrock).

We really cannot tell from photos if they used vapor barrier or not...

enter image description here

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No wet seal in a shower even if it is cement sheet is a really bad idea! And Plaster... Really.. You could put laminex in but get it custom made to size for a gloss look –  UNECS Nov 24 '12 at 4:38
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What is mounted in the electrical box? I sure hope it is a shower rated fixture. It is way to close to the water source. –  shirlock homes Nov 24 '12 at 11:58
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Any Sheetrock, including green moisture resistant, is not intended for use in showers or any environment with repeated direct water contact. You can paint it , but the results will be the same, FAILURE ! Do not attempt to put tile on Drywall either. There are some new high tech backings or you can use good old fashion concrete board or hardi-backer for tiles. If you want a water proof glossy finish, you may have to consider a fiberglass surround kit, which can be installed over green sheetrock or preferably directly over studs with a vapor barrier.

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Because the first photo wasn't rotated, I didn't realize at first that the painted wall was at tub-level where it would be exposed to direct water contact, so I voted to delete my answer. I agree completely with this answer. You can't have drywall in a shower below the shower head level. –  Carey Gregory Nov 23 '12 at 23:55
    
Thank you guys for your responses, unfortunately our contractor used green sheetrock for the side that he painted white and durock for the side of the bathtub (up to a certain level). See fourth picture attached on the question. What do you suggest we do now? Calling this contractor and asking him to redo this is not an option. <BR> Also, what kits are these fiberglass you are mentioning? do you know any particular brand for this kit? –  macutan Nov 24 '12 at 3:35
    
Looking at the forth pic, I see a window. that would preclude using a full surround kit. What type of tiles are those black squares? I didn't see any vapor barrier behind the rock, is it there? You may have to use tile board on the ends. This could be glued to the existing rock. Not the best solution, but the cheapest. I'd pull the rock, replace with concrete board and put up tile. The little detail on the left side of the tub also adds a degree of difficulty to using a kit.. –  shirlock homes Nov 24 '12 at 11:55
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I'm skeptical of the product in the youtube link for showers. 1) I don't trust the "waterproof" membrane. 2) the actual material is porous and needs a sealer. I fear mold and mildew growth. 3) Unless the surface is meticulously polished, it will be difficult to clean. Still think more tile is the best approach. If you really want a solid white plane, perhaps you can source a sheet of material like that used in tub surrounds. –  bcworkz Nov 25 '12 at 20:19
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The actual labor time should only be around 8 to 12 hours, but the process could take a couple of days. Chat with some folks at the local Lowes, HD, or bathroom tile supplier and ask them for a referral to a trusted contractor that they have experience with. –  shirlock homes Nov 26 '12 at 10:32
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I think you are going to have to remove the sheetrock from around the tub and put backer board and tile on it. I don't see any way that sheetrock around a shower like that is going to last.

How is it you have construction photos? Whas it done by somebody you know? Maybe you can ask them "What were you thinking?"

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