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I'm trying to run power for some under-cabinet LED strip lighting. I think the easiest way is to tap into the stove hood, so my question is: how do I do this in a way that is legal and meets code (preferably without tearing apart cabinets/walls)?

Here's the cabinet:

inside cabinet

I need to plug in an IRLinc (3-prong plug), the transformer, and the PWM dimmer controller. I'll also have low-voltage 12V wire exiting out both left and right sides into the adjacent cabinets.

The white box in the center is just some MDF that is covering the vent pipe:

vent cover removed

The power for the hood comes in from the wall:

wiring inside vent hood


Can I run a piece of BX or conduit up to a surface mount box secured to the back of the cabinet? Is it legal to use the vent hood as a junction box (note there's normally a metal cover over those wires)? Any better suggestions?


UPDATE:

BX worked fine. I cut out a big hole because I needed room to be able to put the hood in place with the BX connected, and I left a big loop so there is room to pull the hood down a bit before disconnecting the wire.

hole in cabinet outlet connected finished cabinet

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The range hood is already used as a junction box. You don't want to jam too many wires in there, make sure you do your fill calculations. –  Tester101 Oct 25 '12 at 12:14
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd use the range hood box as a junction box. It meets the code definition of accessible:

Capable of being removed or exposed without damaging the building structure or finish or not permanently closed in by the structure or finish of the building.

And in most places should pass just fine. I'd use BX because that MDF hood cover is rather easily removable, and treat the wiring to the new outlet as 'exposed'.

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But make sure whatever you are connecting does not exceed 1/3 of the Breaker wattage if shared or combined wattage -10% if dedicated. In other word your lights should not exceed max watts + hood wattage of breaker. Typically about 1200W for 1.5mm Core wires –  ppumkin Oct 25 '12 at 12:02
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