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I'm thinking about making an offer on a 1930's house that needs a few improvements. The gas stove/range isn't situated against an exterior wall. Rather, it's placed against the back side of the brick chimney that separates the kitchen from the living room. There's no range hood and no duct.

There are no cabinets installed on the brick above the stove. There is, however, a smallish metal pot rack installed directly onto the brick.

Can I somehow fit this range with a hood, either ducted or ductless? Can I install such a hood directly onto the brick, on the back of the chimney? Pardon my ignorance, but are there ductless units that one can hang from the ceiling, and is there any reason why that wouldn't work for me?

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This Answer might be helpful. –  Tester101 Oct 4 '12 at 17:33
    
futurofuturo.com/rangehood-FAQ-ductless-range-hoods.php Check out the second FAQ item. You might find it useful. –  Chris Cudmore Oct 4 '12 at 17:41
    
Thanks for these links. I should also have asked whether it would be possible/difficult/expensive to have a proper duct installed, possibly running parallel to the chimney. Is it possible to offer an educated guess without seeing the actual house? How much might this cost me to install? –  user7661 Oct 4 '12 at 17:51
    
Within the limits of physics, anything is possible if you have enough money :) If at all possible (physically and financially), install a duct. The power of the fan limits how long/high a duct can be run. And how noisy the fan is. The way I imagine your situation, it is not only doable, but worth doing. –  bcworkz Oct 4 '12 at 18:37
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There's no reason you can't install a hood on the brick, it will work fine. You need to buy one designed to hang on the wall, not the ceiling, and there's loads of choices either way. You can run a power line up from behind the range and hide it with a splashback. I highly recommend a splashback instead of having bare brick as it will be much easier to clean food off of.

As for ducting it completely depends on the construction of your home how possible it is to do, and how cosmetically pleasing you can make it. It's not possible to say without more detail.

Before making any decisions you should check your local building codes, some areas mandate you have to install a duct, others don't. Some mandate you can't have your range in certain places. It would stink to build your kitchen and then find out it's illegal!

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