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I have a 65lb 46" LCD television and a Sanus "flush" style wall mount. The mount instructions suggest that it shouldn't be mounted anywhere where there is more than the thickness of a single sheet of drywall between the mount and the stud.

However, the wall I want to put my TV on has three sheets of drywall (don't ask). I'm wondering of the instructions for the mount are just overprotective and I'll be ok as long as I just get longer screws.

I read another answer where someone claimed they had a 50" TV mount just in drywall, no studs!

The other option I considered (although am loathe to attempt) is to cut away the extra drywall, attach some more wood onto the stud (enough to make up why width of the drywall I removed) and attach the mount to that.

What would you do?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

the thickness of a single sheet of drywall

Did they happen to specify how thick that single sheet should be? I bet that they didn't and are being over protective, because they sell drywall in varying thicknesses from 1/8" up to 5/8".

But I don't think they're being TOO over protective, because I think that's the exact same mount I used, and it mounts using lag bolts. Lag bolts are very heavy duty bolts that are driven into the wood and bite into it to create a very strong anchor.

enter image description here

Their strength, however, is in the depth to which they sink in the underlying wood - the deeper they sink the more thread length is biting into the wood holding on tight. So - if you get too shallow of an installation, you don't get the strength you might need.

I read another answer where someone claimed they had a 50" TV mount just in drywall, no studs!

Not for long, I bet...

The other option I considered (although am loathe to attempt) is to cut away the extra drywall, attach some more wood onto the stud (enough to make up why width of the drywall I removed) and attach the mount to that.

You could do that - I thought about doing the same thing - and the way I would do that is to use a multi-tool (below) to cut out the drywall in the same shape as the back plate of the mount, affix that to the studs very securely, mark the stud location on it and drill through the plate into the studs and mount the panel.

enter image description here

HOWEVER - I suspect there's an even simpler solution.

Get longer lags.

They come in a wide assortment of depths and diameters. Just take the lag bolts they supplied with the mount, go to Lowes/Home Depot - and find one that's the same diameter as what they supplied and about 1" longer than what they gave you, and use those instead.

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I bet they lenghts of the lags supplied with the mount are the reason for the limiting statement also. +1 for using longer lags. I can see no reason why it would not be a safe installation if he gets the lags a good inch or two into the stud. –  shirlock homes Sep 16 '12 at 11:04
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+1 Exactly my thinking. A 50" flat screen weighs under 60 lbs - An 80" isn't even 150lbs. I have little doubt that a single 1/4" lag bolt is capable of holding 150lbs (I'm twice that and I can suspend my weight from one if its well anchored) - so if you use the biggest TV out there, and all 4 lags are anchored properly, then your distributed weight of the TV is not quite 60 lbs per lag. That TV won't go anywhere if you use longer lags and make sure you hit the studs. (Its worth drilling some test holes to be sure - just drill "inside" the plate, where it wont be seen after mounting) –  The Evil Greebo Sep 16 '12 at 13:26
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Thanks! I did just as you said, in fact I got both longer AND wider bolts. I actually got both the same diameter and wider, just in case the wider ones wouldn't fit through the holes in the mount. But they did, so now I've got some really serious bolts deep into the studs. TV is up and looking great. –  seth Sep 17 '12 at 1:05
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