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Our house has several sliding windows that have a strip of rubber weatherstripping where the movable part of the window meets the frame when closed. The most recent paint (a semi-gloss latex) is over two years old, and it still sticks like it was painted yesterday. I've tried Amour All, which seemed to help briefly, but I'd like to find something that might last an entire season, hopefully without a buildup of gunk.

The window slides on an aluminum rail, and works reasonably well once there is the slightest gap.

Clarification: The window slides without problem, except that the vinyl weatherstip sticks to the paint (so much that it sometimes pulls some of the weatherstrip out of its groove, and some paint is now on the vinyl instead of the frame).

Vertical vinyl strip is the problem

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2 Answers 2

There is really only one product you should use on windows and door hinges, that is dry silicone spray. Silicone will not remain wet, collect dirt or build up with every coat or application. Spray the tracks liberally then wipe it gently with a soft cloth to distribute the product and remove access. I think you will be pleased with how well it works and how long it lasts.

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Would this work on sliding windows? The situation here is a painted surface sticking. –  ChrisF Aug 30 '12 at 11:16
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@TomG isn't asking how to lubricate the track, it's about how to stop the window sticking to the frame –  GdD Aug 30 '12 at 12:11
    
It's sticking because its not lubricated. –  Steven Aug 30 '12 at 13:23
    
@GregDolph has it right - sliding on the track is OK; the problem is the first 1/8" when the weatherstrip sticks to the frame. –  TomG Aug 31 '12 at 1:54
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I'm wary of suggesting that you use any sort of lubricant on the area as it's likely to smear and get rubbed off, leaving you needing to clean the area and re-apply regularly. The problem with the stickiness is the smoothness of the paint. You could try lightly sanding the contact area with some medium-grain sandpaper just to rough the paint up a bit. If you do it right people won't notice unless they're really looking for it.

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