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I am about to install a chain link fence between my deck and pool. My pool has a 4 inch slab of concrete and I have about 5" between the deck and the start of the concrete. The chain link fence will just fit between the two.

It will be near impossible to dig a hole in that small of a space. This fence will be a 4' fence, low grade, as it's more to act as a visual buffer between the deck and the pool for our young daughter (the entire backyard is enclosed in a 6ft vinyl privacy fence.

So my question is, what is the minimum height I should drive the posts to make them sturdy - and would it help to attach the posts to the side of the concrete pad with U brackets?

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If you haven't done so already, it may be worth calling the local building inspector, as some localities have very particular requirements for fences around pools. – Vebjorn Ljosa Aug 27 '12 at 11:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I understand that it would be difficult to dig holes for a concrete footing for your posts. Depending where you are located and the soil types, you could drive the posts in and still have a stable fence. If you are in an area with frost in the ground, I would encourage you to set them at least 3 feet deep if the soil is stable and compacted. The basic rule of thumb is to bury at least a third of the posts, but half the length is even better if you can do it.

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Basically it depends on what you prefer!

If you want the post to be super steady you need concrete footings for the posts. Otherwise, embedding the post into the ground is fine. The length you need under the ground should not be less than 2 ft.

Hope this helps you!

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