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I have this style of fence abutting my driveway (but this is not my fence):

Cedar fence

Currently, I don't have a good way to attach my motorcycle's inch-thick cable lock to it (or to anything), other than to feed it through the fence'S slats, which is not only going to damage my fence and the hedge once it grows in, but it's a pain (not to mention that a crowbar would make quick work of the fence anyway).

The driveway is a pavé uni made of 6-inch square blocks, so I'd like to avoid drilling and installing an anchor in the driveway.

What creative options do I have? There's a very wide flowerbed on the other side of the fence: what about sinking a cinderblock and running a chain up and through the fence that's long enough to afford me some room to anchor easily?

Bonus: if someone can give me the technical name for this type of fence, that would be cool, merely because I'm curious.

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I believe that configuration of pickets makes this a "good-neighbor fence," so called because neither side looks worse than the other. –  ArgentoSapiens May 1 '12 at 21:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I like the buried chain idea. In fact, you don't even need to use cinder blocks. They make 'earth screws' which are large auger-looking thing that you literally screw into the earth. Typically used as playset tie-downs or party-tent tie downs.

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Alternatively, maybe attach a bar to one of the fence posts. I'm thinking one of the stainless hand-bars you'd normally mount in a shower. It's one piece, shouldn't rust, and would look OK.

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I like the earth screw idea, but it would be easier to get out of the ground without tools than a cinder block - just "unscrew" it. If you wanted to prevent that from happening, you could put two in the ground side by side, and lock a steel bar through the two eye holes at the top. That way they can't be removed from the ground because you can't turn them. –  Doresoom May 1 '12 at 16:26
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That's not a bad idea, though, that said, with a chain through the eyelet, it'd be a difficult thing to unscrew. –  DA01 May 1 '12 at 16:33
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I like this idea a lot! I'll wait to see if anything else comes up, but this seems like a winner. Note to self: beware sprinkler piping... –  msanford May 1 '12 at 17:44

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