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Does anyone know of any safety organization like osha that gives a list of tools that should not be operated while wearing gloves? It has always been my understanting that a person should not wear gloves when operating any rotating tool because of the danger of the gloves getting caught in the rotating part and breaking fingers or loosing a limb. Unfortutatenly the safety department does not agree with me and I am concerned for the safety of my crew.

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Loose improperly sized gloves = Dangerous. Properly fitting gloves = Safety. Get your crew some good properly fitted gloves, and make sure they are replaced as they wear out. –  Tester101 Jan 31 '12 at 13:13
    
Adding on to @Tester101 - gloves appropriate for the work and weather are important too. You wouldn't wear stiff leather gloves to clean a carburetor in the parts cleaner, you wouldn't wear winter gloves to saw lumber summer, and so on. –  Freiheit Jan 31 '12 at 14:47
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I never wear gloves when operating lathes, mills, drill presses, or bench grinders. Basically any tool that has a rotating component, weighs more than me, or has a gap a glove could get sucked into. I'm not sure what OSHA would say to that though. –  Doresoom Jan 31 '12 at 15:30
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I think its also useful to know the scenario. ie: Use of gloves will be different on a construction site than in a workshop –  Steven Jan 31 '12 at 15:47

3 Answers 3

from OSHA Guide for Protecting Workers from Woodworking Hazards

Hand and Arm Protection

Your workers' hands and arms will need protection from burns, bruises, abrasions, cuts, and exposure to the chemicals used in finishing.

Protective gloves are the primary means available for direct hand protection. Extra-long gauntlets or sleeves attached to the gloves can extend protection up the arm. However, the appropriateness of glove use in the woodworking workplace should be carefully reviewed on a task-by-task basis. Gloves should not be worn when operating woodworking equipment due to the potential for getting caught in moving parts.

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For Osha, I only see a chemical list for gloves, for tools I don't see a list. If you are required to wear gloves or other PPE, the company should have proper training and/or documentation for the use of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment). I know it sounds kind of silly (how do I use gloves) but it is required.

General Statement of Glove PPE from Osha

For hand protection, there is no ANSI standard for gloves but OSHA recommends that selection be based upon the tasks to be performed and the performance and construction characteristics of the glove material. For protection against chemicals, glove selection must be based on the chemicals encountered, the chemical resistance and the physical properties of the glove material.

http://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3151.pdf

The above link/document has lots of details on PPE.

I don't think there is any hard rules on glove use. For starters, whatever tool is being used, look at the manual to see if glove use is forbidden. It should be clearly marked. Usually there is a safety page that shows what PPE equipment should be employed for the operation of the tool.

Also, as others have pointed out in the comments, use a glove that fits and is right for the job at hand.

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Search for the word "glove" in this OSHA publication Safeguarding Equipment and Protecting Employees from Amputations for examples of accidents caused by wearing gloves near machinery. Also see this thread at the Practical Machinist forum for a discussion of the issue.

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Answers that are completely based on links can become useless, if for example the linked document is removed. Selecting appropriate sections from the document and quoting them in your answer, will ensure the answer is still useful even if links go dead. –  Tester101 Feb 1 '12 at 13:07

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