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I am working with an electrical socket and I need extra length on the ground wire. It doesn't seem unreasonable that I can attach an extra three inches to the existing one and attach it with a copper wire crimp. Does anyone see a problem with this?

I have no extra slack on the rest of the wires, so I am not able to pull it through any further.

This is the type of crimp I am talking about, but I guess it's crimp sleeve

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What gauge wire? Can you clarify what you mean by "copper wire crimp"? Perhaps link to a specific product? Have you considered wire nuts and push-in wire connectors? –  Jay Bazuzi Jan 21 '12 at 22:43
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14-gage wire. I updated my question with a pic. I guess it's actually called a crimp sleeve. You put the ground wires through it and the crimp it with a pair of pliers. –  oscilatingcretin Jan 21 '12 at 23:26
    
I just noticed the last sentence in your comment. I never thought of using a wire nut since I only liken those to hot/neutral wires. I suppose they would work the same for ground wires, though. I'll give it a shot in a few days. –  oscilatingcretin Jan 22 '12 at 1:13
    
@oscilatingcretin - Jay's right, you can add a wire on a crimp and attach it to the ground on the receptacle/socket. Jay should add this as an answer and you should select it as an answer and give him an up vote also. –  lqlarry Jan 22 '12 at 2:54

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Technically, you should twist the extension bare ground wire to the short one and secure it with one of the copper crimps like you have pictured. A wire nut certainly would work , but it should be green. Practically speaking, either way will work and be safe, just a matter if you want to follow current NEC standards.

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This is what I had done (twisting and securing with copper crimp sleeve). Thanks for the reassurance. –  oscilatingcretin Jan 23 '12 at 14:20
    
@shirlockhomes could you point me to the article in NEC that says to use green wire nuts? I've searched and searched, and I haven't been able to find it (though they do use some odd language in parts, I could just be misreading it). Trying to learn as much as I can, so I can give better answers. –  Tester101 Jan 23 '12 at 21:44
    
Just to follow up, where can one get extra grounding wire? Would a wire nut also work? If the existing ground wire is not copper, what other metal could it be (it's silver in appearance)? –  Kermit Oct 20 '13 at 21:05
    
This part is incorrect: "...but it should be green." Wire nuts are color coded based on the wire sizes they can accommodate, not green for ground/white for neutral/etc. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twist-on_wire_connector#Color_code There are special green wire nuts for ground wires and a hole to pass through a looped wire (e.g. to connect to a switch, receptacle, or device) made by some manufacturers, but I cannot find anywhere in the NEC where they are REQUIRED to be used. –  user20839 Apr 4 at 23:57
    
@Juggernaut The answer says "should", not "must". Green screws, wire nuts etc. are customarily used with ground wires even if there isn't a specific regulatory requirement to do so. –  Niall C. Apr 5 at 15:49

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