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As a basic prep step before I painted, I sanded some of my walls.

Later, I cleaned the area and swept up any visible dust particles.

Now however, a member of my family is having difficulty breathing when they spent any length of time in an adjoining room.


Two questions:

  1. Can I clean the air to rid it of these seemingly invisible dust particles?
  2. Can I buy a test kit or pay somebody to test the air for invisible dust particles that may make it difficult to breathe?
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Not an answer to your questions but try wiping the walls with a cheese cloth. It's tacky and will pick up accumulated dust and it leaves no residue. Just do it in a way not to stir any more dust. If the floors are not carpeted then do the floors as well. It could help. –  lqlarry Dec 31 '11 at 3:53

2 Answers 2

A cheap and easy solution would be to strap an air filter to a box fan and run it in the room for awhile. I've seen several variations of the basic concept. Here is one example:

Build a do-it-yourself air purifier for about $25

enter image description here

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I did this method in an apartment I used to live next to the highway in the summer to deal with the soot and road grime. –  cabbey Jan 3 '12 at 6:24
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An observation on the linked video, it's a lot easier to put the filter on the intake side of the fan than the output. Air pressure holds it in place better than tape, especially if you crank it fan speed up to medium. –  cabbey Jan 3 '12 at 6:31
    
@cabbey: Great point on placing the filter on the intake side. –  mwolfe02 Jan 3 '12 at 15:46

HEPA air purifiers are like low-pressure, high-volume shop vacs and are great for this. They average about $150 and you can find them at just about any large store. Very useful for clearing allergens and dust particles.

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What exactly do you mean by "low-pressure" and "high-volume"? –  Pacerier Apr 10 at 16:46

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