Take the 2-minute tour ×
Home Improvement Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for contractors and serious DIYers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
How do I prepare a chipped, peeling, deeply cracked wall for painting?

I notice that there are patches of paint that are peeling especially the area that is near computer & monitors.

May I know how do you deal with such peeling of paint?

Do you just paint a new coat of paint over?

Do you just remove all the peeling and apply anti-bacteria paint follow by a water proof paint?

Are there other ways to permanently deal with paint peelings?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Niall C., Tester101, BMitch, ChrisF Dec 7 '11 at 23:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to figure out why the paint is peeling, address the problem, and then re-paint.

In many houses, the chances are that the paint was not properly applied - the wall was dirty or damp.

The first step is to remove the peeling paint. If you're lucky, it's just one wall or a small patch - otherwise, you'll have to do the entire wall or room. Start by scraping off as much loose material as possible, and then sand around the scraped areas. Make sure that there aren't any places where the paint hasn't adhered, but hasn't started to flake yet.

Next, apply a coat of primer/sealer. You may find at this point that the first coat loosens the existing paint - you'll need to decide whether to go back and remove more depending on how bad it is.

Finally, after the primer has dried, repaint.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Chris, I suspect is that the dampness produce by the heat from the computer and monitor. I have move all the computers and monitors away from the wall. Will be going to buy primer/sealer to start the fix. Thanks. –  Larry Morries Dec 2 '11 at 8:16
    
The electrical equipment can't actually create damp. Feasibly if you spend long periods in a badly-ventilated room you could increase the humidity enough by your own breath/perspiration. This might condense out later when everything's off and the temperature falls. But I'd get a competent builder in to check whether the damp is coming from outside, since in that case you'd be largely wasting your time trying to seal it from the inside. –  FumbleFingers Dec 2 '11 at 18:19
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.