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Here's what the bare frame looks like: enter image description here

If you don't already know how a wall is hung with Genie Clips, here's the video. Skip to 2:45 to see how they're spacing the clips.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bf5syq09qa0

Looking at my pic above, you will see that there are no exposed studs at the opposite ends of the wall, so I am going to have to install them so that I have a place to attach the clips on either side. This is going to create a non-standard distance of 10" between the first set of studs on the left side of the wall and 9 1/2" on the right.

I am guessing that this is not going to present too much of a problem since the video never mentions a minimum distance of 16" between clips, only a maximum distance of 48".

Since this is my biggest DIY project ever, I want your input on whether or not this non-standard stud placement will affect the hanging of my new wall with Genie Clips.

Update:

A few years later, I know, but I thought I'd post a pic showing what the channels looked like after mounted onto the Genie clips. You can also see the two new studs I installed if it matters any.

enter image description here

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add the studs at the ends of the wall. It should not affect the installation.

Look at the video. At 3:38 they talk about having clips close together in some places. They say it is normal.

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I saw that part, but that was a perfect frame where they demonstrated the installation at a minimum distance between studs of 16". What they were referring to was how some clips are closer together than the regular 48". Either way, I think you're right about it being okay to have less than 16" between the edges of the studs. –  oscilatingcretin Nov 13 '11 at 16:01
    
You might be able to get away with using 2x2s (if you can find a straight one). That'd make id a) easier to stall and b) offer more of a break between the wall behind. –  DA01 Nov 13 '11 at 17:42
    
Try turning the 2x4 sideways (flat side toward the wall). That should be easier to install. Just tonail it in place. –  Scott Bruns Nov 14 '11 at 0:49
    
You could skip the studs that are next to the new studs that you will install. That would keep the distance greater than 16" but less than 48". –  Scott Bruns Nov 14 '11 at 0:50

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